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Duracell Batteries?
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Mar 7, 2019 10:42:04   #
bpulv (a regular here)
 
Rab-Eye wrote:
I generally stick to batteries from the camera manufacturer. However, I chanced across a link online to a Duracell battery that is 50% the cost of the manufacturer's battery for one of my cameras. With Duracell being a name brand, I wonder if it’s worth spending the extra money on OEM? Does anyone have any experience with Duracell brand batteries made for cameras, or in general just have thoughts to share?

Thanks!


I do not like the unpredictable discharge curve of rechargeable cells, so I use Duracell non-rechargeable batteries exclusively for my cameras, two-way radios and other electronic equipment! They tend to perform better than any of their competition both in reliability and performance. At a premium price, the Duracell Quantum cells hold their charge and last noticeably longer than any other non-rechargeable AA cells and I use them when I travel overseas or have special demanding requirements. I also used the Duracell Procell batteries when I worked in industry and aerospace before my retirement. Many versions of the Procell rechargeable batteries were the only ones certified for both satellite and manned spaceflight back in the 80's although I do not know if that is true today.

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Mar 7, 2019 10:54:05   #
NCMtnMan
 
BebuLamar wrote:
Specs doesn't mean a thing.


They do if you want them to operate properly in the device.

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Mar 7, 2019 11:08:40   #
GrandmaG
 
Rab-Eye wrote:
I generally stick to batteries from the camera manufacturer. However, I chanced across a link online to a Duracell battery that is 50% the cost of the manufacturer's battery for one of my cameras. With Duracell being a name brand, I wonder if it’s worth spending the extra money on OEM? Does anyone have any experience with Duracell brand batteries made for cameras, or in general just have thoughts to share?

Thanks!


I use eneloop rechargeable batteries because sometimes Duracell leak! This would be for flash units mostly. For the camera itself, I find OEM generally last longer. Just my 2 cents!

EDIT: I have not seen Duracell batteries for any of my cameras, and therefore can’t comment on them.

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Mar 7, 2019 11:24:49   #
Flash Gordon
 
I have had several Costco AA and AAA batteries leak, mainly in flashlights. I have started using rechargeable batteries in many devices with the hope they are less prone to leakage. What say the crowd? Recently purchased some Energizer AAA non-rechargeable batteries for flashlights and other devices. I picked Energizer because the package stated “protects your devices from leakage up to two years after fully used”. We shall see. I may just start to replace all batteries in sensitive devices every January 1st. Are the rechargeables really less likely to leak?

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Mar 7, 2019 11:30:03   #
rcarol (a regular here)
 
Rab-Eye wrote:
Consumer Reports rates Kirkland batteries as best buys.


I have had first-hand experience with Kirkland AA & AAA batteries leaking. I still use them but I periodically check them and change them as soon as I see them starting to leak. And I don't use them in any piece of equipment that is expensive to replace.

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Mar 7, 2019 11:33:31   #
Mikeazz
 
Hi,

Kirkland batteries, may be a best buy, but they're not as bright as the Duracell. I had always bought Kirkland batteries, and used them for many years, until one day, I had 2 flashlights, and one had Kirkland & the other Duracell batteries. When I turned them both on, to make sure they worked, I was amazed at the difference in their output.

I then started to test all my flashlights, comparing, both batteries, and was surprised to see the Duracell batteries were much brighter. I brought, the last batch, of Kirkland batteries, back to Costco, and now only use the Duracell.

As was mentioned, the Duracell batteries do seem to leak and corrode. I just had to toss an expensive, photography flashlight, that had multicolored lenses because the batteries corroded, and destroyed it.

Hope this helps.

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Mar 7, 2019 12:05:10   #
cjc2 (a regular here)
 
Duracell is the only brand of battery that I will NOT use at all. I have had way too many leakage problems which is something that I do not have with Eveready. I have not used Duracell Li batteries for any cameras and I never will. Personally, I use ONLY OEM batteries in my Nikons. They cost more but I've also never had a battery issue and I need my batteries to be a non-issue to properly complete my assignments. Best of luck.

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Mar 7, 2019 12:06:37   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
NCMtnMan wrote:
They do if you want them to operate properly in the device.


Third party batteries generally have better specs yet they generally work not as well as OEM batteries.

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Mar 7, 2019 12:24:02   #
Mikeazz
 
I didn't mention that I only use OEM batteries, in my cameras. I only use Duracell for (inexpensive) flashlights.

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Mar 7, 2019 12:56:01   #
rook2c4
 
Rab-Eye wrote:
At what cost? Better to pay for the repair. My two cents.


At what cost? The cost of the company agreeing to repair the damaged camera at no charge because it finds no fault with the customer for the malfunction. Leaving the non-OEM batteries in the camera when sending it off for repair is not a wise decision.

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Mar 7, 2019 13:18:06   #
David C.
 
I will not name the brand but I did a lot of work for a major battery company at their test facility. I inquired why there were so many different brands of batteries on the test trays. I expected to see only their name brand. I was told the testing had to include other brands of the like design and application. This was a process that incorporated both integraty and honesty in their product testing. I was also told that some/many of the OEM brands were actually produced by that company but re-branded and packaged for the OEM's product market...they still had to be tested so the sellers (OEM's) had proof of quality. David C.

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Mar 7, 2019 13:19:33   #
larryepage
 
I rarely have had a problem with AA cells, rechargeable or not. But AAA cells just seem to be born waiting to leak, even before they are fully depleted.

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Mar 7, 2019 13:26:24   #
E.L.. Shapiro (a regular here)
 
The Graveyard of the Batteries?

These images show 4 months worth of dead batteries at my studio. To do our part of environmental protection, we don't throw them in the garbage. We put them in our " dead battery bucket and bring them to the quarterly hazardous materials collection in our neighborhood.

Besides our cameras, we have a dozen portable strobes, a bunch of Speedlights, a dozen Pocket Wizard radio slaves, 3 exposure meters, a few remote controls and half the stuff in the office has batteries. You can't even get a pencil sharpener with a crank anymore! Then I go home at night- even the cat teaser laser flashlight sucks up batteries.

Battery management has become expensive. So, here's what I recommend. Get a battery tester that analyzes battery voltage under load and allows you to maximize battery usage. When they become a bit weaker or borderline, the go into non-critical service in penlights etc. until they are gone.

Get a multimeter or a milliampere meter to measure charging rates on rechargeable cells. Our Lumadyne strobes have been converted to use sealed lead-acid batteries (Gel-Cells) and I monitor there charging rates to insure they don't overcharge and heat up.

I simply don't bother with off-brand or batteries of unknown quality in the cameras or speedlights. I realize that Nikon and Canon batteries are probably subcontracted to third-party manufacturers but they are supplied with the cameras and sold under the name brands and should be guaranteed by the companies should there be a serious leak or malfunction that requires warranty repairs.

I understand that some battery companies will replace items damaged by there batteries, but I don't want to experience these issues and have costly equipment damaged by aftermarket batteries- especially in the midst of an assignment.

Never leave batteries in long term storage IN dormant equipment. If you are worried about your camera de-programming, then take the time to monitor the battery condition or periodically put the batteries back in and run the camera. Neglected batteries cause problems.

Keep battery terminals and your battery compartments clean and inspect them regularly. If there are any signs of corrosion, discoloration, crusty deposits, stains or leakage, attend to it immediately. Check to see if any tension springs are in good order. The terminals on batteries can be cleaned, OUT OF THE CAMERA OR STROBE, with ink erasers, emery boards or solvents formulated for electronics, however, DO NOT USE ANY OF THESE ITEMS IN THE CAMERA as debris or fragments can cause a serious malfunction. A clean cloth or Q-Tip with a small quantity of Isopropyl Alcohol or a dab of electronic cleaner should suffice.

So...If you use lots of batteries as I do, set up a program to look after them. If you don't use all that many batteries just extract a few of my tips and use the name brand batteries that are recommended for your gear. Don't risk a major repair to save a comparatively few dollars.







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Mar 7, 2019 13:30:47   #
Muddyvalley (a regular here)
 
rook2c4 wrote:
Gee, all you have to do is take the non-OEM battery out and replace it with an OEM battery before sending the camera in for repair. Not hard to do. The company will then have to blame their own battery for causing the trouble. Risk averted, rmalarz!


To start with, this would be dishonest. Your complaint is with the non-OEM company and you don't hesitate to try to cheat the Camera company?
Secondly, I have little doubt that it would be easy to determine that the OEM battery did not cause the problem and your claim would be denied. They then may, or may not offer to do the repair for a fee.

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Mar 7, 2019 13:35:05   #
Muddyvalley (a regular here)
 
rook2c4 wrote:
At what cost? The cost of the company agreeing to repair the damaged camera at no charge because it finds no fault with the customer for the malfunction. Leaving the non-OEM batteries in the camera when sending it off for repair is not a wise decision.


Your advise was to replace it with an OEM battery. I don't believe that you would tell them the real cause.
What cost?
At the cost of your integrity.

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