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Moon Help
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Feb 28, 2019 07:14:13   #
capmike
 
Not a big moon photographer, but read that Jupiter was going to be in the crescent of this mornings moon. I was up, so what the heck. Jupiter was far away and never going to be in the crescent before the sun rose, but the moon seemed quite interesting through my 420mm lens on a crystal clear morning. My question is how to prevent the side facing the sun from being blown out, making all the easily visible craters disappear?? By the way, this was handheld, D 850, 5.6, 1/400, ISO 7,200.

Thanks for any input.


(Download)


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Feb 28, 2019 07:15:18   #
f8lee (a regular here)
 
What does it mean that Jupiter is going to be in the crescent of the moon? Surely it is not going to appear in the darkened portion of the moon - unless the moon itself turns invisible...

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Feb 28, 2019 07:29:31   #
capmike
 
It was supposed to be in the imaginary cup formed by the crescent, just past the darkened moon.

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Feb 28, 2019 07:43:15   #
george19
 
Looking at my astronomy app, and the conjunction was likely 2/27, however...you might get a similar chance in a month. Jupiter just doesn’t move that fast across the sky.

On a related note, my app showed that all planets should be visible now in a given all-night session (while I doubt you could raise Pluto with a consumer telescope, it is in the mix).

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Feb 28, 2019 07:51:07   #
kenneil
 
Manual, 1/60 f8 base ISO and adjust ;-)

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Feb 28, 2019 07:54:23   #
Ayesart
 
Shoot and dither into sepia, adjust contrast on you computer.

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Feb 28, 2019 07:55:17   #
kenneil
 
Manual, 1/60 f8 base ISO and adjust ;-)

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Feb 28, 2019 07:58:12   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
"Blown out" means over-exposure. Try bracketing your shots. I don't shoot many in that phase but you won't need anywhere near the ISO you set.

There are always a flurry of "what happened?" topics after full moons and at least 90% are due to over-exposure. If I find any crescent shots, I'll let you know. Best wishes!

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Feb 28, 2019 07:59:54   #
sergiohm
 
capmike wrote:
Not a big moon photographer, but read that Jupiter was going to be in the crescent of this mornings moon. I was up, so what the heck. Jupiter was far away and never going to be in the crescent before the sun rose, but the moon seemed quite interesting through my 420mm lens on a crystal clear morning. My question is how to prevent the side facing the sun from being blown out, making all the easily visible craters disappear?? By the way, this was handheld, D 850, 5.6, 1/400, ISO 7,200.

Thanks for any input.
Not a big moon photographer, but read that Jupiter... (show quote)


Should have used F11, 1/100, ISO 100 to 200

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Mar 1, 2019 13:07:32   #
JFCoupe
 
I am not an expert but have taken quite a few moon shots over the last 5-6 years and can share the following.

Your camera needs to be set to manual mode because aperture and shutter priority metering will blow out the detail of the moon surface due to the dark sky.

Typically you can set your ISO around 400. For a bright full moon, I will make my first shot at around 1/400 shtterspeed and a wide open aperture. Then I check the image and enlarge it to check for detail. From there I make adjustments to shutter speed dropping to 1/200 and then typically somewhere between 1/200 and 1/400.

For half-moon or crescent moon shots, I adjust my starting shutter speed lower to account for the darker moon light.

Also, my Olympus OMD EM1 MK II has a fold out screen and I find using it with Live View on, is extremely helpful when the moon is high overhead. I am typically shooting with my 100-400 lens on a ballhead on a tripod. I find handholding is not possible for me to get sharp moon images.

Good luck with your future moon shots.

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Mar 1, 2019 18:22:48   #
FramerMCB
 
You don't need to shoot the moon at such a high ISO. Shoot in manual mode with ISO set to between 100 - 400 at f11 (or f8) (trying the different combos to ensure you will have a high-enough Shutter speed) and select a shutter speed that is approx. 1.25X-1.5X the focal length of your lens (since you have a high MP sensor in that D850) and you mentioned you are hand-holding the lens. So if your shooting your zoom lens at 320mm make sure your shutter speed is at minimum 1/400 or 1/480 to get the best results (this is somewhat dependent on your shooting technique coupled with how steady your hands are).

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Mar 1, 2019 18:29:13   #
FramerMCB
 
<Should have used F11, 1/100, ISO 100 to 200>

This is a response to the above (trying to quote "sergiohm"'s post)

The OP cannot shoot an 80-400mm zoom lens zoomed out to 320mm at 1/100th for shutter speed while hand-holding and expect to capture sharp images. For that they would need to mount it on a tripod or use a bean bag on top of a vehicle or other stable object.

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Mar 1, 2019 21:08:58   #
fetzler
 
Sunny 16 for the bright side.

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Mar 2, 2019 02:44:42   #
jcspics
 
capmike wrote:
Not a big moon photographer, but read that Jupiter was going to be in the crescent of this mornings moon. I was up, so what the heck. Jupiter was far away and never going to be in the crescent before the sun rose, but the moon seemed quite interesting through my 420mm lens on a crystal clear morning. My question is how to prevent the side facing the sun from being blown out, making all the easily visible craters disappear?? By the way, this was handheld, D 850, 5.6, 1/400, ISO 7,200.

Thanks for any input.
Not a big moon photographer, but read that Jupiter... (show quote)


If you have photoshop goto image-adjustments-curves then select medium contrast

Next goto Filter-Sharpen-Unsharp Mask- and make these adjs: Amount- 150% Radius-1.0 Threshold 0

and my Nikon D7200 settings are usually: ISO100 / f11~16 / Speed 1/190~1/125th (longest lens you have 200mm or longer is almost required and VR if hand-held but turn off if using tripod) using daylight WB and RAW... When importing use camera neutral preprocessing

Thanks and hope that helps you...

Jim Cameron
JCStudio Photography
www.jcspics.com



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Mar 2, 2019 04:02:41   #
chipdog902
 
Spot on! By bracketing. I recently worked with my daughter-in-law with her basic Canon T5, tripod and kit lens. She wanted--and got some really great shots of the moon! How--by keeping it simple-- bracketing. Film is cheap--because she wasn't using any.

Don't be intimidated with all that 'fix it in the mix,' stuff....that will come in time. Be creative--and HAVE FUN! //...Not really sure what operating system, or software, Ansel Adams used, and his stuff is pretty cool.

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