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Is it me or the lens?
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Feb 11, 2019 15:54:44   #
LeeK
 
First time on this topic area. Hope it's right. I recently got a new lens and have been trying it out. The lighting conditions weren't the best but I wanted to use it. I find that when I download and then look at the ''View Actual Size' option, none of them look very clear. In the past, I have used this function on Windows Photos, to help me determine how well focused the picture is.
The new lens is a Nikon 300-70mm. My old one was a Nikon 200- 50mm.
1/125sec., f8, 300mm, ISO 400
1/125sec., f8, 300mm, ISO 400...
(Download)
less light - 1/125sec., f6.3, 300mm, ISO 800
less light - 1/125sec., f6.3, 300mm, ISO 800...
(Download)
1/200 sec., f5.6, 300mm, ISO320 - flash too?
1/200 sec., f5.6, 300mm, ISO320 - flash too?...
(Download)
1/200, f5.6, 200mm, ISO 320 - flash?
1/200,  f5.6, 200mm, ISO 320 - flash?...
(Download)

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Feb 11, 2019 16:06:07   #
TonyP
 
LeeK wrote:
First time on this topic area. Hope it's right. I recently got a new lens and have been trying it out. The lighting conditions weren't the best but I wanted to use it. I find that when I download and then look at the ''View Actual Size' option, none of them look very clear. In the past, I have used this function on Windows Photos, to help me determine how well focused the picture is.
The new lens is a Nikon 300-70mm. My old one was a Nikon 200- 50mm.


Hi Lee, assuming you didnt use a tripod and seeing you say they were at 300mm, my guess is you have a bit of camera shake affecting your samples.
Being a new lens and perhaps not being used to the extra weight and length, I think 1/125 and 1/200sec exposure is a bit brave.
Try 1/500th sec and work up from there, light permitting of course.
Cheers

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Feb 11, 2019 16:08:05   #
LeeK
 
TonyP wrote:
Hi Lee, assuming you didnt use a tripod and seeing you say they were at 300mm, my guess is you have a bit of camera shake affecting your samples.
Being a new lens and perhaps not being used to the extra weight and length, I think 1/125 and 1/200sec exposure is a bit brave.
Try 1/500th sec and work up from there, light permitting of course.
Cheers


I will try that. I am reluctant to increase the ISO but it does make sense.

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Feb 11, 2019 16:13:02   #
MauiMoto (a regular here)
 
LeeK wrote:
First time on this topic area. Hope it's right. I recently got a new lens and have been trying it out. The lighting conditions weren't the best but I wanted to use it. I find that when I download and then look at the ''View Actual Size' option, none of them look very clear. In the past, I have used this function on Windows Photos, to help me determine how well focused the picture is.
The new lens is a Nikon 300-70mm. My old one was a Nikon 200- 50mm.

Does the 70-300mm have VR? And is the camera a crop sensor or full frame? If it's a crop without VR try raising your shutter speed above 450.

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Feb 11, 2019 16:15:07   #
TonyP
 
Whats the problem with increasing the ISO? I assume you have a fairly recent Nikon camera. You have heaps of ISO leeway. Heaps.

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Feb 11, 2019 16:15:49   #
LeeK
 
LeeK wrote:
I will try that. I am reluctant to increase the ISO but it does make sense.

Was this lens a good choice for wildlife? Tripods are hard to work with when you never know when or where you will see the next shot or how long it will be there. I just never seem to be close enough to get good shots with my 200mm. Also, invariably, the lighting conditions aren't always the best.

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Feb 11, 2019 16:31:40   #
TonyP
 
LeeK wrote:
Was this lens a good choice for wildlife? Tripods are hard to work with when you never know when or where you will see the next shot or how long it will be there. I just never seem to be close enough to get good shots with my 200mm. Also, invariably, the lighting conditions aren't always the best.

Yes, in my opinion, its a good versatile zoom range.
Increase your ISO so you get an exposure in the range of, lets say, 1/500th sec and f5.6 (just as a random exposure suggestion).
If the subject is stationary, use a pinpoint focus setting and try and aim it at the eye of your subject.
Fill the frame as closely as you can to save cropping later.
Experiment with your settings is the key and dont be afraid of using the ISO range.
As Ive just noticed, check that you have VR turned on.
I dont think its necessary, for this type of shot, to consider using a tripod if you have VR available.
It really comes down to familiarity with your gear and a well practiced technique I think.

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Feb 11, 2019 16:36:01   #
LeeK
 
Thanks again, Tony. I will definitely try all this. Can't wait until the hummingbird comes back and get out in the woods to shoot some wildlife.

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Feb 11, 2019 16:37:12   #
Indi
 
LeeK wrote:
First time on this topic area. Hope it's right. I recently got a new lens and have been trying it out. The lighting conditions weren't the best but I wanted to use it. I find that when I download and then look at the ''View Actual Size' option, none of them look very clear. In the past, I have used this function on Windows Photos, to help me determine how well focused the picture is.
The new lens is a Nikon 300-70mm. My old one was a Nikon 200- 50mm.


I think you might have some camera shake on the first one. A little more pronounced on the second one. The third & fourth images are pretty damned good as far as I'm concerned.

Tony P is right on with the faster shutter speed. Upping the ISO could be a minor issue because noise can be eliminated in PP.

I also observed your depth of field is very narrow so it could be hit and miss getting the focus exactly on the subject.

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Feb 11, 2019 16:45:09   #
uhaas2009
 
VR, time,iso is Mentioned before. Your bird is small-did the focus really focus on the bird or focused on the leaves........

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Feb 11, 2019 16:46:46   #
dione961
 
LeeK wrote:
Was this lens a good choice for wildlife? Tripods are hard to work with when you never know when or where you will see the next shot or how long it will be there. I just never seem to be close enough to get good shots with my 200mm. Also, invariably, the lighting conditions aren't always the best.


Hi LeeK,

I have a 1 year old VR version of the 70-300, on a D7200 - so crop frame - and many of my bird shots look similar to yours. I am a novice though. Still, I rarely use this lens outdoors now unless there is bright sunlight & even then my lens seems to be sharpest (bearing in mind I am a novice) between around 90mm to around 240mm. I have only shot it hand held so far as I clamber around muddy hills, rocks, roots & steams a lot. For my skill level I need to keep shutter speed above 1/250s, more at the longer end of the range, and around 1/500s for wildlife "stills" and shots with trees or grass if it's windy. In low light this means wider apertures & when that runs out - ISO! But with this lens, even in bright sunlight I try to keep ISO below 450 when zoomed out to avoid grainy shadows and 'flat'-looking scenery.

It is most likely my skill (lack of) but I rarely get as good images with the 70-300 as I do with the 18-140 and the less light the more this is true (for me). Do bear in mind I am a 1005 learner though!

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Feb 11, 2019 16:51:49   #
repleo (a regular here)
 
LeeK wrote:
First time on this topic area. Hope it's right. I recently got a new lens and have been trying it out. The lighting conditions weren't the best but I wanted to use it. I find that when I download and then look at the ''View Actual Size' option, none of them look very clear. In the past, I have used this function on Windows Photos, to help me determine how well focused the picture is.
The new lens is a Nikon 300-70mm. My old one was a Nikon 200- 50mm.


General rule of thumb for hand held is to use a shutter speed no more than the reciprocal of the apparent focal length of the lens. So for 300mm lens use 1/300 sec or less on FF or 1/450 sec for crop.

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Feb 11, 2019 17:01:21   #
LWW (a regular here)
 
Is it a VR Lens?

Either way, here are some handheld tips oft forgotten in the VR era.

- Tuck your elbows against your body.

- Place your left foot forward and pointed towards the target.

- Place your right foot a bit behind and at an angle to your right foot.

- Cradle the lens with your left hand.

- Breathe in just before you press the shutter and breathe out just after.

- Press the shutter with the pad of your finger with just enough pressure to fire it. DON’T squeeze the camera with your whole hand.

These steps will eliminate a lot of the human induced vibration/movement.

I hope this helps.

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Feb 11, 2019 17:04:49   #
LeeK
 
repleo wrote:
General rule of thumb for hand held is to use a shutter speed no more than the reciprocal of the apparent focal length of the lens. So for 300mm lens use 1/300 sec or less on FF or 1/450 sec for crop.

I thank you all for your responses. I will take them all into consideration as I go forward.

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Feb 11, 2019 17:10:02   #
LWW (a regular here)
 
LeeK wrote:
I thank you all for your responses. I will take them all into consideration as I go forward.


I think most are here to help.

The main thing is practice and have fun.

I don’t know how old you are, but onthe film days this hobby cost a fortune in film and development to learn.

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