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Raw and/or JPEG
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Feb 9, 2019 23:02:53   #
PhotoNat
 
This is my first DSLR camera. When shooting, is it necessary to set it for BOTH raw and JPEG, or can I just set it for raw, then convert to JPEG after post processing in Photo Shop Elements 14? I'm thinking of the amount of space used on my SD card and in my computer storage, with raw vs. both.

I am new to this, so all advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks,
PhotoNat

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Feb 9, 2019 23:08:58   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
It is not necessary. If you like JPEGs for what you shoot, you're good. If you like the extra latitude of RAWs in processing, you're good there too.

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Feb 9, 2019 23:09:07   #
LarryFB
 
If you don't have a reason for immediate access to a JPG (like uploading to social websites, stock photo site, photo-journalism, etc.) and you want to post process a RAW photo, then it makes sense to only shoot Raw!

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Feb 9, 2019 23:20:27   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
PhotoNat wrote:
This is my first DSLR camera. When shooting, is it necessary to set it for BOTH raw and JPEG, or can I just set it for raw, then convert to JPEG after post processing in Photo Shop Elements 14? I'm thinking of the amount of space used on my SD card and in my computer storage, with raw vs. both.

I am new to this, so all advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks,
PhotoNat


To directly answer your question.
Shoot RAW only to save space.
You have the most data available and can use it as you desire later and convert to JPEG those you wish to to share..

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Feb 9, 2019 23:42:29   #
PhotoNat
 
Thank you Larry. That is what I thought, however just wanted to make sure, and not find out later for some reason I should have done both.

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Feb 9, 2019 23:44:03   #
PhotoNat
 
Thank you for confirming my thoughts. Still learning, and not always confident that my thoughts may actually be correct.
PhotoNat

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Feb 9, 2019 23:45:20   #
JR45
 
This is what works for me.

I shoot RAW + JPG. I use the JPG files for a quick look much like making
contact prints like in the film day.

Any PP is done from the raw files. Prints made from TIFF files.

Archive the RAW to external drives (cloud). I can always make JPG files.

This may or may not work for you or others.

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Feb 9, 2019 23:54:20   #
GrandmaG (a regular here)
 
LarryFB wrote:
If you don't have a reason for immediate access to a JPG (like uploading to social websites, stock photo site, photo-journalism, etc.) and you want to post process a RAW photo, then it makes sense to only shoot Raw!


I’ve been shooting RAW only for several years. I prefer to perfect an image before sharing it.

However, I recently bought a book to REALLY learn my new Sony a7iii and the author recommends shooting RAW+JPEG. I think to save space on the second card and for faster saving of the images on the cards. I tried it both ways and I couldn’t see a difference; but both of my cards are the same.

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Feb 10, 2019 00:01:54   #
LarryFB
 
GrandmaG wrote:
I’ve been shooting RAW only for several years. I prefer to perfect an image before sharing it.

However, I recently bought a book to REALLY learn my new Sony a7iii and the author recommends shooting RAW+JPEG. I think to save space on the second card and for faster saving of the images on the cards. I tried it both ways and I couldn’t see a difference; but both of my cards are the same.


However, remember that Raw has an imbedded Jpg in the file. When you look at the Raw file, that is what you see. Post processing programs are different.

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Feb 10, 2019 00:04:09   #
JD750 (a regular here)
 
PhotoNat wrote:
This is my first DSLR camera. When shooting, is it necessary to set it for BOTH raw and JPEG, or can I just set it for raw, then convert to JPEG after post processing in Photo Shop Elements 14? I'm thinking of the amount of space used on my SD card and in my computer storage, with raw vs. both.

I am new to this, so all advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks,
PhotoNat


My advise is for people new to DSLR, and photography, shoot jpeg until you master the basics. Shooting raw has a place. But it adds complexity and time to the back end and eats up a lot of storage. For now you want to be be focusing on the basics, and not worrying about the format or how to process a raw file. All too often people use raw as a crutch for poor camera skills. Develop the camera skills. They will pay off.

And please take the time to read the UHH article at the link below.

https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-575239-1.html

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Feb 10, 2019 00:08:52   #
mwsilvers (a regular here)
 
Architect1776 wrote:
To directly answer your question.
Shoot RAW only to save space.
You have the most data available and can use it as you desire later and convert to JPEG those you wish to to share..


I shoot raw only, and its not to save space. Since I post process all my raw images, having jpegs straight out of the camera would be a meaningless exercise.

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Feb 10, 2019 00:45:06   #
JD750 (a regular here)
 
mwsilvers wrote:
I shoot raw only, and its not to save space. Since I post process all my raw images, having jpegs straight out of the camera would be a meaningless exercise.


But you are not "new at this" with your first DSLR.

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Feb 10, 2019 00:51:08   #
GrandmaG (a regular here)
 
LarryFB wrote:
However, remember that Raw has an imbedded Jpg in the file. When you look at the Raw file, that is what you see. Post processing programs are different.


Right, you can’t actually VIEW a Raw file. I just wondering about the logic of saving JPG to the second card to clear out the buffer quicker.

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Feb 10, 2019 02:34:35   #
PhotoNat
 
GrandmaG,
Thank you. I did not know Raw had a jpg file imbedded into it. So am understanding you correctly, that when I look at the photos I have taken on the camera or computer screen I see jpeg images, then when I upload them on PhotoShop Camera Raw, that is when I see Raw images?
PhotoNat

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Feb 10, 2019 05:23:33   #
Gene51 (a regular here)
 
PhotoNat wrote:
This is my first DSLR camera. When shooting, is it necessary to set it for BOTH raw and JPEG, or can I just set it for raw, then convert to JPEG after post processing in Photo Shop Elements 14? I'm thinking of the amount of space used on my SD card and in my computer storage, with raw vs. both.

I am new to this, so all advice would be much appreciated.
Thanks,
PhotoNat


For most scenarios, jpeg is ok. If you shoot subjects that are on "the edge" as far as contrast range or insufficient light with requires high ISO, there is no question that shooting jpeg will not yield the high quality that a raw file can provide.

I don't use PSE at all - never have. My post processing tools include Capture One, On1, PS/LR, DXO PhotoLab.

I also haven't used camera-generated jpegs since 2006 when I got my first DSLR that could shoot raw. I post process 100% of the images I either deliver to a client or post online or print and sell. The only time I don't see much difference between a camera generated jpeg and one that I process from a raw file is in those circumstances where I control the light (contrast), and adjustments are slight.

I have also compared jpegs from camera and jpegs from raw and found the raw ones to contain more fine detail, which is important when looking at images up close (small prints).

There is a value to using a single shooting workflow - instead of raw, raw+jpeg, or jpeg. My results are far more consistent and I work better/faster.

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