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D7200 Resolution Dilemma
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Feb 10, 2019 12:27:41   #
RichKenn
 
Lenstest says the difference between 6.3 and 8 is one line per mm out of forty.

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Feb 10, 2019 13:40:28   #
CO (a regular here)
 
Nasim Mansurov of Photography Life has some interesting observations regarding high resolution cameras. This was from his review of the D7000. He was comparing the 16MP D7000 with earlier 6MP cameras. He has some good examples. See this link:
https://photographylife.com/reviews/nikon-d7000/3

1) High resolution sensors need better lenses that can resolve more detail. Do not expect your old crappy DX kit lens to give you super sharp images on the D7000.

2) Camera shake is more noticeable on high resolution sensors when images are viewed at 100%.

3) Even slight autofocus errors are quite visible on high resolution sensors.

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Feb 10, 2019 14:36:23   #
RichKenn
 
Good article. Thanks. I do wonder if my Sigma 100-400 mm is up to 24 megapix. My Nikon lenses all have good ratings, though. I don't consider them "crappy kit lenses."

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Feb 10, 2019 18:13:11   #
User ID (a regular here)
 
RichKenn wrote:

Do you really think that is the difference? Let me show you
some more. I blew a portion of each up 1529% to get a good
view of the edges. In these two blowups, the D7000 (3499)
looks sharper to me.


I don't believe your tests are properly or carefully done.

Why do I see perspective affecting the shape of the test
page in the OP ? A proper test demands targets at truly
perpendicular to the lens axis .... which acoarst will not
cause a perspective effect. Whazzupwiddat ?

.

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Feb 10, 2019 19:12:05   #
Grahame (a regular here)
 
RichKenn wrote:
Both were cropped to 1200x1800 pixels which will deliver 300 ppi to a 4x6 print. Of course the D7200 image is larger. You expect more of 8 million more pixels! I certainly would expect the same resolution from the same number of pixels. One of the reasons you purchase more pixels is to either improve resolution for the same picture size or obtain the same resolution from a larger picture. In this case I was looking for the same resolution for a larger image.


It appears to me that you have been sucked into the "more megapixels are going to give me better pictures" syndrome.

The D7200 Osprey example you have posted is at 'max focal length of the lens', 'max aperture at that focal length', 'severely cropped' and additionally subjected to unknown variables affecting the result such as camera movement, atmospheric haze, poor exposure, bad lighting, focus inaccuracy's and wind on subject.

How do you know the D7200 image has not been affected by one of the mentioned 'variables'?

To even consider "comparing this" example with another image that just happens to be better is a futile exercise.

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Feb 10, 2019 19:34:16   #
sloscheider
 
I like the dpreview comparison page for camera reviews. Hers a link to the 7200 review, bring up the D7000 on the right side and look around the image. Crank up the ISO and see how much better the D7200 is.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikon-d7200/12

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Feb 10, 2019 22:57:36   #
sv3noKin51E
 
Rich, We've used Nikon service twice in past years for our D700 and D7200. Initial repair estimates were about $300 each. The D700 had developed chronic AF issues. After service it focused fine and seemed to function as new; thank goodness for the 6-month refurbished warranty. Within two months, the AF became positively myopic. We weren't overjoyed but the pain eased a bit when Nikon immediately authorized us to ship it back for warranty return. The 2nd time they kept it a longer, again replacing the motor and many other parts. Whatever magic used worked and no gremlins ever resurfaced. A couple of years ago our D7200 needed mirror/shutter work. Nikon worked on it and had it back to us within two weeks performing as-new. Sadly, two weeks later we knew that something was seriously failing and again, Nikon immediately authorized the return. Three weeks later, the 7200 was home and purring like a kitten, with another new motor and another list of newly replaced parts, with no further issues.

If Nikon hadn't acted quickly after each initial repair, it would've generated some grumbling and quiet ill-will but they acted honorably, and ranting never resolves anything. Others have mentioned similar problems at various Nikon authorized repair centers including LA, but apparently Nikon investigated and satisfy the customers involved.

It's not for everyone but next-day shipping is a plus, not a minus. We shipped the camera to Nikon (each one, both times, both ways) by next-day air, with fully hazard insurance. The value of the camera justified the expense based on workflow. It's better for a work camera to arrive at Nikon the next morning, to await servicing locked up in Nikon's air-conditioned facility, as opposed to having bounce across-country in a semi. When next-day air and full-replacement value hazard insurance is purchased, it automatically gets the shipping agent's full attention and is marked for special-air transport handling. A friend of ours sent his camera to Nikon for a shutter replacement. He wasn't in a rush and chose standard ground shipping with no extra declared value or hazard insurance. His camera was less than a year old, under warranty, so he was stunned when the shipper contacted him with news his (newly-repaired) camera had been accidentally destroyed in transit after it was picked up from service. All he had to show was a $100 check and pieces of his camera; none of his home or business insurance mattered. Nikon can offer customers a break on next-day return shipping of their repairs and full hazard shipping insurance, if requested in advance to be added to the repair invoice. Hope this helps, and glad you're happy with your new D7200. sv

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Feb 10, 2019 23:24:24   #
RichKenn
 
Thanks. It is comforting to know that Nikon has given such good service. I have contacted them and am waiting for a reply.

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Feb 11, 2019 00:07:42   #
chrisg-optical (a regular here)
 
RichKenn wrote:
Both were cropped to 1200x1800 pixels which will deliver 300 ppi to a 4x6 print. Of course the D7200 image is larger. You expect more of 8 million more pixels! I certainly would expect the same resolution from the same number of pixels. One of the reasons you purchase more pixels is to either improve resolution for the same picture size or obtain the same resolution from a larger picture. In this case I was looking for the same resolution for a larger image.


Because the D7200 has 8 more MP than the 7000 there is a higher pixel density on the D7200/7100 sensor...meaning, a 1200x1800 pixel crop represents a smaller surface area on the 7200 chip = less translational information than the 7000 with the same # of pixels....this plus the other factors mentioned above contributes to the disparity in IQ. If you are enjoying the 16 mp don't fret over it just enjoy the art. Most of the differences in IQ these days will be more related to lens quality rather than the sensor MP, unless you are doing heavy cropping.

D7000 23.6 x 15.6 mm 4,928 x 3,264 208.81 px/mm x 209.23 px/mm 5.75mm x 8.6mm = 49.45 mm2

D7200 23.5 mm. x 15.6 mm 6000 x 4000 255.32 px/mm x 256.41 px/mm 4.7mm x 7.02mm = 32.99 mm2
(these numbers are approximations to a small degree because there are actually more pixels on the chip due to the bayer layout, but they should wash out for both).

But the upshot is it's usually, but not always better, with all else equal, to use more sensor area of a lower MP chip, rather than a smaller area of larger MP chip, at a given pixel count, in this case 1200x1800 or 2.16 MP.

Personally I hate cropping and rather get it right in the camera by optical means (longer lens, more zoom, teleconverter, getting closer, etc.). When making comparisons between different MP sensors to use the whole sensor/ full data is best and fairest.
D7200 with Tamron 90mm
D7200 with Tamron 90mm...
(Download)

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Feb 11, 2019 00:35:07   #
chrisg-optical (a regular here)
 
sloscheider wrote:
I like the dpreview comparison page for camera reviews. Hers a link to the 7200 review, bring up the D7000 on the right side and look around the image. Crank up the ISO and see how much better the D7200 is.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikon-d7200/12


Shows the value of standardized tests...and two generations. Also interesting to note compare the JPG and RAW versions....RAW presumes you will do your own NR whereas the cameras do a pretty good job cleaning up the image...I was looking at ISO 12800 JPG vs RAW for both.

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Feb 11, 2019 22:09:38   #
RichKenn
 
I can't find any instructions on how to boost the sharpening to level 6. No, I haven't tried any of the scene modes but I don't think I should have to resort to gimmicks to bet the performance I am used to or hopefully a little better.

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Feb 11, 2019 22:29:01   #
CO (a regular here)
 
RichKenn wrote:
I can't find any instructions on how to boost the sharpening to level 6. No, I haven't tried any of the scene modes but I don't think I should have to resort to gimmicks to bet the performance I am used to or hopefully a little better.


The picture controls affect the .jpeg files out of the camera. I think you mentioned that you were post processing the RAW files so it wouldn't have any effect with those. Sharpening is in each one of the picture controls.



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Feb 20, 2019 15:32:28   #
RichKenn
 
Even given my crude, ineffective, juvenile testing methods, Nikon finally saw fit to take the refurbished D7200 back and issue a credit. I love them. I found a new one on sale at Abe’s of Maine and purchased it. My mother always said,
“It is better to be lucky than smart.” It performs just as I had expected the D7200 to perform. And, my knobbleheaded understanding of pixels has improved. Thank you to all who tried to help me. What do you think of my Osprey pictures? Mamma is sitting on those eggs.


(Download)


(Download)

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Feb 20, 2019 15:39:47   #
gmsatty
 
My question is: why did you purchase from Abe's of Maine? Most of what they sell is gray market. I would make very sure that there is a Nikon US warrantee in your product.

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Feb 20, 2019 16:10:50   #
Grahame (a regular here)
 
RichKenn wrote:
It performs just as I had expected the D7200 to perform. And, my knobbleheaded understanding of pixels has improved. Thank you to all who tried to help me.



RichKenn wrote:
What do you think of my Osprey pictures?


I see little difference if any to the image quality posted previously shot with the D7200.

Again these are heavy crops and noisy. Have you tried any with reduced ISO and speed?

Are you using mirror up, with a remote release or timer?

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