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Jan 28, 2019 11:23:10   #
MegTee
 
Hi everyone, this is my first picture post here as an amateur photographer. I would love a critical opinion of this shot and what i can do to make it better either onsite or with photoshop. I wanted to get a dramatic view of all the trees lined up but the sun wasn't cooperating with me. how can i get a better shot next time? thank you


(Download)

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Jan 28, 2019 11:27:57   #
orrie smith
 
MegTee wrote:
Hi everyone, this is my first picture post here as an amateur photographer. I would love a critical opinion of this shot and what i can do to make it better either onsite or with photoshop. I wanted to get a dramatic view of all the trees lined up but the sun wasn't cooperating with me. how can i get a better shot next time? thank you


Photography is all about patience. Wait for the best light when you can. You are correct, you were shooting into the sun, which blew out part of your photo. The good news is that you are able to see the mistakes and find ways to correct them in the future. Also, in the future, it is best to "store original" when posting a photo, simply follow the directions, it allows us better access to the photo for better critique. Enjoy.

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Jan 28, 2019 11:28:24   #
PixelStan77 (a regular here)
 
MegTee wrote:
Hi everyone, this is my first picture post here as an amateur photographer. I would love a critical opinion of this shot and what i can do to make it better either onsite or with photoshop. I wanted to get a dramatic view of all the trees lined up but the sun wasn't cooperating with me. how can i get a better shot next time? thank you
Always ask yourself the question, What am I trying to say. In this was trees. I see more other stuff than trees. So you need to change your angel or zoom in or get closer to your subject.

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Jan 28, 2019 11:29:25   #
MegTee
 
Thank you Orrie for pointing that out. I actually thought that was going to store a replica of the photo on my computer hence not ticking that box, i hope i can rectify it. will check.

orrie smith wrote:
Photography is all about patience. Wait for the best light when you can. You are correct, you were shooting into the sun, which blew out part of your photo. The good news is that you are able to see the mistakes and find ways to correct them in the future. Also, in the future, it is best to "store original" when posting a photo, simply follow the directions, it allows us better access to the photo for better critique. Enjoy.

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Jan 28, 2019 11:32:35   #
MegTee
 
noted with thanks.

PixelStan77 wrote:
Always ask yourself the question, What am I trying to say. In this was trees. I see more other stuff than trees. So you need to change your angel or zoom in or get closer to your subject.

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Jan 28, 2019 11:33:05   #
speters (a regular here)
 
MegTee wrote:
Hi everyone, this is my first picture post here as an amateur photographer. I would love a critical opinion of this shot and what i can do to make it better either onsite or with photoshop. I wanted to get a dramatic view of all the trees lined up but the sun wasn't cooperating with me. how can i get a better shot next time? thank you

Shoot in manual and start with different shutter speeds to get a more dramatic look on the trees, it would also be better to meter on the highlights to bring down the sky a bit!

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Jan 28, 2019 11:37:48   #
Dave327 (a regular here)
 
I agree with the previous. I would have gone to the other end of the street and shot with sun at my back. On that photo I would have waited for the walker to clear. If your emphasis is the trees I would have moved to the right to eliminate all the parked cars or at least to be able to crop them out. This shot is over exposed taking out detail. It is preferable to under expose. All the information is still there and can be brought up in PP.
I would have also done a shot with the camera vertical.

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Jan 28, 2019 11:38:08   #
MegTee
 
Thank you Speters. Still a lot to learn i know, just started shooting manual and learning about ISO, shutter speeds. haven't gotten round to metering yet is it something i have to learn alongside exposure?

speters wrote:
Shoot in manual and start with different shutter speeds to get a more dramatic look on the trees, it would also be better to meter on the highlights to bring down the sky a bit!

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Jan 28, 2019 11:41:38   #
MegTee
 
Thank you Dave. It was quite a busy park and i got frustrated waiting for people to pass. was hoping to crop them out on PP. This was the best shot so far without people in it.

Dave327 wrote:
I agree with the previous. I would have gone to the other end of the street and shot with sun at my back. On that photo I would have waited for the walker to clear. If your emphasis is the trees I would have moved to the right to eliminate all the parked cars or at least to be able to crop them out. This shot is over exposed taking out detail. It is preferable to under expose. All the information is still there and can be brought up in PP.


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Jan 28, 2019 11:44:46   #
AndyH (a regular here)
 
I'd suggest a couple of things in addition to the timing issue on the daylight.

First, if the focus is the line of trees, I wonder whether it would work better to have taken the shot in portrait mode and cropped in further toward the curving line of trees? Most of the stuff on the left of the frame is distracting, at least everything beyond the street lamps, if the regularity and shape of the line of trees is your main focus. Shifting your position might give a different perspective. You might also consider moving in closer (past the storm sewer grate) and using a wider angle lens.

Second, the figure of the person running or walking out of the trees can add to the scene or detract from it. Obviously if you want to focus on the landscape aspects, the figure doesn't add as much, but I like the effect of the figure half behind and half in front of the line of trees.

Focusing on what interested you about the scene is generally the best path to improving your skills.

These are just my opinions, others may differ....

Andy

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Jan 28, 2019 11:46:00   #
PixelStan77 (a regular here)
 
MegTee wrote:
Thank you Dave. It was quite a busy park and i got frustrated waiting for people to pass. was hoping to crop them out on PP. This was the best shot so far without people in it.
In this image I see two different vertical images. Do You?Which one you like better?

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Jan 28, 2019 11:47:29   #
David C.
 
If this was your intended angle of view I would have used a polarization filter. This would have defused
the glare from the sun and sharpened the line of trees. Just my suggestion David C.

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Jan 28, 2019 12:06:58   #
TriX (a regular here)
 
I believe I would have shot this vertically and framed it to take out the houses on the left and truck on the right. Personally, I would have converted this to B&W and either used a polarizer on camera or the appropriate filter in post to darken the sky and increase the contrast with the clouds.

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Jan 28, 2019 12:22:01   #
photogeneralist (a regular here)
 
Simply flipping the photo (left to right) and adjusting in post for a little less overall exposure might work. Flipping puts the beginning of the leading line of trees near the bottom left corner. Most people's eyes enter a picture from that corner. Then straighten the photo so the lamppost on the new left is vertical. As posted, the eye enters from the bottom left then encounters the row of trees and stops at that barrier.
Note: flipping if it works at all, will not work in a photo where written words are visible
I'll PM your photo with these changes to illustrate the effect of the changes.

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Jan 28, 2019 13:04:30   #
David C.
 
TriX has made a good point. A black and white image is often more desirable when you control the contrast with filters and their effects. The medium red or #25 series would have darkened the sky and offered a dramatic background for your row of trees. Cropping out the side images truck, house etc. would be your option. It all comes back to what was your intended angle of view. Note: it always helps to keep the sun at 90 degrees to your image or further behind you if possible...but then what are your attempting to capture?David C. "If you are happy with the photo it good no matter what anyone says!"

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