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Auto ISO
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Jan 11, 2019 20:04:32   #
rbmitch123
 
In taking a long exposure photo, say 2 seconds, would you ever keep your camera on auto ISO? Most cases I am shooting with Aperture priory and Auto ISO. For this discussion I would be shooting a landscape photo at dusk or in the dark.

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Jan 11, 2019 20:11:11   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
I never put my camera on auto ISO.
--Bob
rbmitch123 wrote:
In taking a long exposure photo, say 2 seconds, would you ever keep your camera on auto ISO? Most cases I am shooting with Aperture priory and Auto ISO. For this discussion I would be shooting a landscape photo at dusk or in the dark.

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Jan 11, 2019 20:13:35   #
Ray Maines
 
Once the exposure is activated, the ISO will not change. If you're happy with the way the picture looks when you press the button you should be happy with the finished photo.

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Jan 11, 2019 20:19:45   #
Almostageezer
 
I think that auto iso works best on manual exposure settings. You set aperture and shutter speed parameters and then let the iso be the variable. You can use limits for the iso as well.

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Jan 11, 2019 20:20:14   #
dandi
 
I use almost always auto ISO, the only time I turn auto ISO off is when I use external flash.
Auto ISO is the good way to make sure you are using the lowest ISO.

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Jan 11, 2019 20:20:14   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
You could, as a way to get a ballpark exposure. Set aperture for the depth of field you want, set shutter speed for two seconds, set ISO to auto. Snap the pic.

But now, if the image is too dark or too light for the result you desire, you need to take control. Since you'll be using a tripod, quickest and easiest would be to set ISO manually to what it was when on auto - or lower if you're running into potential noise issues from high ISO - then change your shutter speed. Faster for darker exposure, slower for lighter. Shoot several frames at differing exposures; digital is cheap

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Jan 11, 2019 20:22:26   #
Grahame
 
rbmitch123 wrote:
In taking a long exposure photo, say 2 seconds, would you ever keep your camera on auto ISO? Most cases I am shooting with Aperture priory and Auto ISO. For this discussion I would be shooting a landscape photo at dusk or in the dark.


Personally no, in that situation (dusk/dark/2 seconds) I would be fully manual, the camera would be on a tripod and I would have time to think/adjust.

But, if you can confidently achieve the three settings you want any mode is suitable, even if using Auto ISO.

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Jan 11, 2019 21:11:23   #
lamiaceae (a regular here)
 
rbmitch123 wrote:
In taking a long exposure photo, say 2 seconds, would you ever keep your camera on auto ISO? Most cases I am shooting with Aperture priory and Auto ISO. For this discussion I would be shooting a landscape photo at dusk or in the dark.


I never use Auto ISO. I know what each and every ISO is for.

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Jan 11, 2019 21:19:08   #
Black Elk Peak
 
So. Take a shot with auto ISO; record the ISO setting, and then take more shots of the same situation with different ISO settings and compare the results. I generally use auto ISO and aperture priority.

I remember the good old days when film was ISO 100, 200, 400, 800, etc. You were stuck with the film that was loaded in to the camera and you made the necessary camera setting adjustments as needed. Sometimes I believe we have come too far technically.

Vaughan K.

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Jan 11, 2019 21:50:06   #
IDguy (a regular here)
 
ISO isn’t as important as it once was. Many of today’s cameras are considered ISO invarient. That means you get the same result by increasing the exposure in post processing as you would by increasing ISO in camera.

Here is one discussion of it: https://photographylife.com/iso-invariance-explained

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Jan 12, 2019 06:02:54   #
Manglesphoto (a regular here)
 
rbmitch123 wrote:
In taking a long exposure photo, say 2 seconds, would you ever keep your camera on auto ISO? Most cases I am shooting with Aperture priory and Auto ISO. For this discussion I would be shooting a landscape photo at dusk or in the dark.

I never use auto ISO never. I control my cameras!!
The only auto setting I use is auto focus for moving subjects and landscapes.

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Jan 12, 2019 06:09:14   #
cameraf4 (a regular here)
 
I never use Auto ISO. Setting the ISO is a good way to determine how broad the Dynamic Range will be and how much/little noise will be present.

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Jan 12, 2019 06:18:13   #
martinfisherphoto
 
Here's the problem, you are using a Long exposure to get a properly exposed photo, correct???? Then No reason to use auto ISO, just take the photo and the ISO will adjust for a properly exposed photo. If you understand How a camera works, then you would have a Fixed ISO, adjust shutter speed to properly expose and now you have a photo shot in a lower ISO to prevent a lot of noise/grain from ruining your photo. I would highly recommend the Book, Understanding Exposure 3rd edition by Bryan Peterson. This simple to read and understand book will walk you through how a camera captures an image using the Exposure Triangle. Combination of shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. It will make you photography experience so much more pleasurable and take all of the guess work out..

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Jan 12, 2019 06:20:13   #
camerapapi (a regular here)
 
I want to be in control of my camera. I NEVER use Auto ISO.

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Jan 12, 2019 06:23:31   #
pithydoug
 
rbmitch123 wrote:
In taking a long exposure photo, say 2 seconds, would you ever keep your camera on auto ISO? Most cases I am shooting with Aperture priory and Auto ISO. For this discussion I would be shooting a landscape photo at dusk or in the dark.


I shoot many sunrises and sunsets and always on a tripod. I NEVER use auto in this case and I always set it to 100. Use Ap priority, ISO 100 and let the camera select the select the shutter. Depending on the amount of light it may select 1/2 to 30 seconds. If it's real dark, such that you cant get autofocus to work, manual focus, and then let the camera work. If the camera cries as it wants to go more than 30 seconds, set on bulb and experiment for a minute and more. I have some phenomenal bridge shots using bulb at midnight, with an open shutter 4-6 minutes. How to tell how long to keep it open, experiment.

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