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Pumper zooms on Nikon z?
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Jan 11, 2019 14:03:17   #
karno
 
I was thinking of making a move to Nikon z and go native s lenses, as I research I see that they are making lenses that extend when zooming? I have always avoided these type with the thought that they can suck dust into the lens and sensor, and that they are possibly more easily knocked out of alignment,
Is this prejudice at all logical or am I way off base.
I am a bit perplexed and feel to go Nikon mirrorless and enjoy the weight savings of going Native z mount is out for me.
The older Nikon wide zooms don’t do this?
My 70-200 does not do this.
I am curious if Sony and canons mirrorless zooms are pumper zooms?
Looks like either I use all primes for the z mount when they come out which kills the weight advantage or I am f mount forever.
Maybe Nikons future zooms will not all be pumper zooms?

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Jan 11, 2019 14:14:18   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
That is a good point. I wonder, with everything being dust and weather sealed, if it is as much of an issue today as it was in the past.

--

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Jan 11, 2019 20:06:35   #
CO (a regular here)
 
I rented the Nikon Z6 for one week recently. As soon as I took off the body cap, it stuck me how exposed the sensor is. With the short 16mm flange distance, the sensor is right up in front close to the lens mount and the shutter curtain does not close when the power is off. I think a pumper lens could easily put dust on the sensor. When changing lenses, dust could also get on the sensor.

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Jan 11, 2019 20:57:00   #
martinfisherphoto (a regular here)
 
All of my nikon zooms that extend are dust magnets.. I've learned to live with it and just clean my sensors once or twice a year. I don't use my extension tubes any more so this may improve the dust in the sensor.. Mind you I'm in the field with my lens and camera All the time, they do not sit on the shelf. My last full frame had 80,000 clicks. Just bought a new one and so far sensor is clean. Plenty of dust inside all my different zoom lens

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Jan 12, 2019 07:04:18   #
nimbushopper (a regular here)
 
The better(and more $)nikon zooms don't pump in and out when zoomed. They probably are much harder to make. My old 80-200 AFS is one of these and that's why I still hold onto it. No VR and you have to switch from auto focus to manual using a switch, not to hard to live with.

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Jan 12, 2019 07:42:53   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
karno wrote:
I was thinking of making a move to Nikon z and go native s lenses, as I research I see that they are making lenses that extend when zooming? I have always avoided these type with the thought that they can suck dust into the lens and sensor, and that they are possibly more easily knocked out of alignment,
Is this prejudice at all logical or am I way off base.
I am a bit perplexed and feel to go Nikon mirrorless and enjoy the weight savings of going Native z mount is out for me.
The older Nikon wide zooms don’t do this?
My 70-200 does not do this.
I am curious if Sony and canons mirrorless zooms are pumper zooms?
Looks like either I use all primes for the z mount when they come out which kills the weight advantage or I am f mount forever.
Maybe Nikons future zooms will not all be pumper zooms?
I was thinking of making a move to Nikon z and go ... (show quote)


A properly made "pumper" zoom is no problem. They are weather sealed and so far over the last 10 years or so I have never had any problem with "pumper" zooms and dust. (Mine are Canon though) except for a Nikon 70-210 that gets less use.

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Jan 12, 2019 08:57:16   #
aflundi
 
karno wrote:
... My 70-200 does not do this....Maybe Nikons future zooms will not all be pumper zooms?

It's hard to make internal-zoom lenses. The 70-200mm or longer seem to be practical (but generally more expensive) if the zoom range isn't too big, but I don't think it's practical for wide (say 14-24mm -ish) or normal (24-70mm -ish) or for any wide zoom ranges.

I would expect the same for Z-mount as F-mount -- the 70-200/2.8 S will probably be an internal zoom, but the others zooms on the roadmap probably won't be. I don't think the mount choice makes much, if any, difference.

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Jan 12, 2019 09:57:32   #
aflundi
 
It might be interesting to make a list of internal zoom lenses. As a strawman, off the top of my head, current dSLR internal zoom lenses are:

Canon:
* 16-35/2.8
* 16-36/4
* 70-200/2.8
* 200-400/4 ??
Nikon:
* 16-35/4G
* 70-200/2.8E (I think the G VRII is discontinued)
* 70-200/4G
* 180-400/4E
* 200-400/4G
Sigma:
* 18-35/1.8
* 50-100/1.8
* 70-200/2.8
* 150-300/2.8
* 200-500/2.8
* 300-800/5.6
Tamron:
* 70-200/2.8

Corrections?

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Jan 12, 2019 10:56:31   #
via the lens (a regular here)
 
karno wrote:
I was thinking of making a move to Nikon z and go native s lenses, as I research I see that they are making lenses that extend when zooming? I have always avoided these type with the thought that they can suck dust into the lens and sensor, and that they are possibly more easily knocked out of alignment,
Is this prejudice at all logical or am I way off base.
I am a bit perplexed and feel to go Nikon mirrorless and enjoy the weight savings of going Native z mount is out for me.
The older Nikon wide zooms don’t do this?
My 70-200 does not do this.
I am curious if Sony and canons mirrorless zooms are pumper zooms?
Looks like either I use all primes for the z mount when they come out which kills the weight advantage or I am f mount forever.
Maybe Nikons future zooms will not all be pumper zooms?
I was thinking of making a move to Nikon z and go ... (show quote)



Don't let perceived obstacles get in your way...learn how to clean the sensor and move on. Love my Nikon Z7.

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Jan 12, 2019 11:27:19   #
wrangler5
 
I think my Nikon 17-35/2.8 only moved elements internally. That was a carryover from my film days, as was the 80-200/2.8.

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Jan 12, 2019 12:20:41   #
aflundi
 
wrangler5 wrote:
I think my Nikon 17-35/2.8 only moved elements internally. ...

Can you double check that? I see references to "camming" when zooming and can't find any claim other than yours of internal zooming.
Quote:
as was the 80-200/2.8.

Yeah, I know about the 80-200/2.8 (I have one), but don't consider that current.

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Jan 12, 2019 13:11:49   #
wrangler5
 
Sorry, I have disposed of all my Nikon equipment so can't check it. But I had that lens for a long time, and am pretty sure that the front element never moved throughout the zoom range. It's possible that the rear element moved, but I didn't think that would cause an air pressure differential that would ingest dust. (I used it for many years at horse shows, and swapped it regularly with the 80-200, and never had a dust problem on the sensors after I went digital.)

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Jan 12, 2019 15:47:55   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
CO wrote:
I rented the Nikon Z6 for one week recently. As soon as I took off the body cap, it stuck me how exposed the sensor is. With the short 16mm flange distance, the sensor is right up in front close to the lens mount and the shutter curtain does not close when the power is off. I think a pumper lens could easily put dust on the sensor. When changing lenses, dust could also get on the sensor.



Could it be that you are not used to seeing the sensor? When I lock my mirror up for cleaning the sensor sure looks vulnerable. On the other hand as long as there is a body cap or a lens on the camera (99.9% of the time) the sensor is protected.

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Jan 12, 2019 16:01:44   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
Rich1939 wrote:
Could it be that you are not used to seeing the sensor? When I lock my mirror up for cleaning the sensor sure looks vulnerable. On the other hand as long as there is a body cap or a lens on the camera (99.9% of the time) the sensor is protected.


Too bad there is no shutter to protect the sensor when the lens is off.

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Jan 12, 2019 16:03:35   #
aflundi
 
Architect1776 wrote:
Too bad there is no shutter to protect the sensor when the lens is off.

Yeah, clever move by Canon for the R.

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