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Jan 11, 2019 08:20:41   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She is responsible for first introducing me to the joys of textures

Please share one of your favorite "heavily processed" landscapes and talk a bit about your vision and how you created the result.

Many thanks for your participation!

--

Here's one to start. I changed the reality (photo #2) from warm sunrise to explore more mysterious and moody. Is there a sense that this is nighttime and moonlit?

In my raw editor I changed white balance to custom and this faded blue. In Nik Color Efex I used several filters in varying modes and strengths: contrast color, low key, duplex. I created bottom half of sun (which is obscured by a ridge line in original), added a great blue heron from another photo (they are very common in the pastures catching rodents the cattle stir up). Final touches included some softening and cloning of fog and lessening of background details.


(Download)



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Jan 11, 2019 09:03:29   #
photophile (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She is responsible for first introducing me to the joys of textures

Please share one of your favorite "heavily processed" landscapes and talk a bit about your vision and how you created the result.

Many thanks for your participation!

--

Here's one to start. I changed the reality (photo #2) from warm sunrise to explore more mysterious and moody. Is there a sense that this is nighttime and moonlit?

In my raw editor I changed white balance to custom and this faded blue. In Nik Color Efex I used several filters in varying modes and strengths: contrast color, low key, duplex. I created bottom half of sun (which is obscured by a ridge line in original), added a great blue heron from another photo (they are very common in the pastures catching rodents the cattle stir up). Final touches included some softening and cloning of fog and lessening of background details.
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She ... (show quote)


I like your addition of the heron, it looks natural, also like the cool toned foggy look.

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Jan 11, 2019 09:11:57   #
photophile (a regular here)
 
A view of Cleveland skyline through Lakewood park trees. I used "moody beach" gallery effect in SPE.


(Download)

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Jan 11, 2019 09:45:18   #
cameraf4
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She is responsible for first introducing me to the joys of textures

Please share one of your favorite "heavily processed" landscapes and talk a bit about your vision and how you created the result.

Many thanks for your participation!

--

Here's one to start. I changed the reality (photo #2) from warm sunrise to explore more mysterious and moody. Is there a sense that this is nighttime and moonlit?

In my raw editor I changed white balance to custom and this faded blue. In Nik Color Efex I used several filters in varying modes and strengths: contrast color, low key, duplex. I created bottom half of sun (which is obscured by a ridge line in original), added a great blue heron from another photo (they are very common in the pastures catching rodents the cattle stir up). Final touches included some softening and cloning of fog and lessening of background details.
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She ... (show quote)


Hmmm. This feels weird. As a rule I do not "heavily process" my images. If they are "that bad" I usually toss them. However on a miserably rainy day in the Canadian Rockies I saw this scene and, yeah, I rushed it. Before giving up on it, I thought I would give Aurora a try.

Is this what you had in mind, Linda?
Spirit Island
Spirit Island...
(Download)


(Download)

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Jan 11, 2019 09:47:01   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
photophile wrote:
A view of Cleveland skyline through Lakewood park trees. I used "moody beach" gallery effect in SPE.
Thanks for your engaging photo, Karin. Can you explain what the effect did specifically, such as color, focus etc? And is "SPE" PS Elements? I'm having a slow brain morning

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Jan 11, 2019 09:47:48   #
Anvil
 
I did this one almost two years ago. I was learning some new Photoshop techniques, at the time, and I wanted to see if I could use those techniques to alter, completely, the mood of a shot.

This droopy tree reminded me of something. Many years ago, I was in Georgia, on business. I had to stay the weekend, so I took a little road trip, to Macon. I wanted to visit the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, which, I have learned, has since closed. I also had to visit the Rose Hill Cemetery, the resting place of Duane Allman and Berry Oakley, and the birthplace of "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed". (I never found Elizabeth Reed's grave.)

It was actually the drive back, from that visit, that had the visual impact that I remembered. The forest along the highway is covered with kudzu, a creeping vine that blankets the forest. (I believe that blanket does the trees no favor.) In the sunlight, the sight is interesting enough, but at dusk, when I was driving back, the view was positively creepy. That feeling is what I was trying to achieve, with this experiment.

The purpose of this experiment was not to create great art, but to reinforce a set of techniques that I had recently learned. Consequently, I pretty much threw everything but the kitchen sink into this. I did all kinds of things, like darkening, adding beams of light, creating my own patchy fog. The end result was actually something I liked, so I kept it.
The end result.
The end result....
(Download)
The original.
The original....
(Download)

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Jan 11, 2019 09:53:49   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
cameraf4 wrote:
As a rule I do not "heavily process" my images. If they are "that bad" I usually toss them.
The intent of the thread is opposite your contention that only "bad" photos should be heavily processed. Hopefully, this will be made clearer if there is sufficient interest from others who enjoy the creativity of the digital darkroom.

Do you like your Aurora result? Or was it a one-off you hope never to have to repeat?

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Jan 11, 2019 09:56:12   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She is responsible for first introducing me to the joys of textures

Please share one of your favorite "heavily processed" landscapes and talk a bit about your vision and how you created the result.

Many thanks for your participation!

--

Here's one to start. I changed the reality (photo #2) from warm sunrise to explore more mysterious and moody. Is there a sense that this is nighttime and moonlit?

In my raw editor I changed white balance to custom and this faded blue. In Nik Color Efex I used several filters in varying modes and strengths: contrast color, low key, duplex. I created bottom half of sun (which is obscured by a ridge line in original), added a great blue heron from another photo (they are very common in the pastures catching rodents the cattle stir up). Final touches included some softening and cloning of fog and lessening of background details.
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She ... (show quote)


Linda, at the risk of sounding like a 'contrarian' shouldn't subjects of this nature be discussed in the Post Processing section. I believe that the Landscape forum is better served as vehicle to display our final results than as a how we got there forum.

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Jan 11, 2019 09:58:54   #
dsmeltz (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She is responsible for first introducing me to the joys of textures

Please share one of your favorite "heavily processed" landscapes and talk a bit about your vision and how you created the result.

Many thanks for your participation!

--

Here's one to start. I changed the reality (photo #2) from warm sunrise to explore more mysterious and moody. Is there a sense that this is nighttime and moonlit?

In my raw editor I changed white balance to custom and this faded blue. In Nik Color Efex I used several filters in varying modes and strengths: contrast color, low key, duplex. I created bottom half of sun (which is obscured by a ridge line in original), added a great blue heron from another photo (they are very common in the pastures catching rodents the cattle stir up). Final touches included some softening and cloning of fog and lessening of background details.
MinnieV and I will be co-hosting this thread. She ... (show quote)


Following this thread closely. It looks to be quite educational.

| Reply
Jan 11, 2019 10:00:42   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
Anvil wrote:
I did this one almost two years ago. I was learning some new Photoshop techniques, at the time, and I wanted to see if I could use those techniques to alter, completely, the mood of a shot.

This droopy tree reminded me of something. Many years ago, I was in Georgia, on business. I had to stay the weekend, so I took a little road trip, to Macon. I wanted to visit the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, which, I have learned, has since closed. I also had to visit the Rose Hill Cemetery, the resting place of Duane Allman and Berry Oakley, and the birthplace of "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed". (I never found Elizabeth Reed's grave.)

It was actually the drive back, from that visit, that had the visual impact that I remembered. The forest along the highway is covered with kudzu, a creeping vine that blankets the forest. (I believe that blanket does the trees no favor.) In the sunlight, the sight is interesting enough, but at dusk, when I was driving back, the view was positively creepy. That feeling is what I was trying to achieve, with this experiment.

The purpose of this experiment was not to create great art, but to reinforce a set of techniques that I had recently learned. Consequently, I pretty much threw everything but the kitchen sink into this. I did all kinds of things, like darkening, adding beams of light, creating my own patchy fog. The end result was actually something I liked, so I kept it.
I did this one almost two years ago. I was learni... (show quote)
Thanks so much for the details of your exploration, Jim. I've sometimes known exactly where I wanted to go with my edits, but often I experiment. All part of the joy!

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Jan 11, 2019 10:01:18   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
Rich1939 wrote:
Linda, at the risk of sounding like a 'contrarian' shouldn't subjects of this nature be discussed in the Post Processing section. I believe the the Landscape forum is better served as vehicle to display our final results than as a how we got there forum.
I respect your viewpoint, Rich.

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Jan 11, 2019 10:08:33   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
#1 - two textures + PS Elements "bas relief" in soft light blend mode at 65% opacity. I liked the contrast of red and blue and felt the scene deserving of a change in seasons


(Download)
ORIGINAL
ORIGINAL...

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Jan 11, 2019 10:10:42   #
minniev
 
Excellent example, Linda, of changing a scene which was perfectly acceptable as it was into an entirely different and even more interesting image by editing it towards that different story you were trying to tell.

My journey, which has paralleled your own, has taken me deep into Photoshop to add extra elements both real and fanciful, textures photographed or found elsewhere, colors crafted from the scene or altered entirely, light added or subtracted, to make something else other than what I first saw.

These sorts of images start, for me, with the question "what if?" After that, one step may lead me to consider another. I don't pretend that they are realistic, pure photography, which remains one of my interests but not my only one. When I see something wonderful I capture the scene as best know how for a pure photograph, then I capture it again for what I can already imagine doing with it later. I call this process "harvesting pixels". I may use my pixels pretty much as captured, or I may rearrange them in a new way.

This was one of my first ventures into creative processing. It's a seascape in Maine. I really liked the original image as it was, but the "feel" of the scene was more moody, more timeless, and more artsy than the capture, so I altered the colors and light and added a strong texture which I painted in/out variably using masking. I've learned more about how to control what I do as I've practiced.
edited
edited...
(Download)
original
original...
(Download)

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Jan 11, 2019 10:11:21   #
dsmeltz (a regular here)
 
Rich1939 wrote:
Linda, at the risk of sounding like a 'contrarian' shouldn't subjects of this nature be discussed in the Post Processing section. I believe that the Landscape forum is better served as vehicle to display our final results than as a how we got there forum.


My view is that his thread is really looking at how various PP techniques are applied to landscape. If the focus was on a single technique, I might agree. But the conversation really seems landscape oriented to me.

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Jan 11, 2019 10:26:58   #
minniev
 
photophile wrote:
A view of Cleveland skyline through Lakewood park trees. I used "moody beach" gallery effect in SPE.


I don’t know how this image started out so I’m not sure how different it is from your original, but you’ve accomplished a very pleasing and delicate look that reminds me of Japanese photographs and cherry blossom season.

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