Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Art
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Jan 10, 2019 08:41:22   #
ngrea
 
Reading a Hog conversation that gọt a little warm about whether post processing removes the pure “art” from photography. It seems some think photography must be SOOC to be “real”.
It seems to me the post processing could be interpreted as being similar to what a painter or sculptor does. Is a blob of paint SOOT (straight out of the tube) more “authentic” than the final painting the artist does? Is the sculpture of less merit than the block of granite?
The color and the granite are both genuine, and can covey a message without manipulation, but the artist that changes them also brings us something from his/her mind and heart that conveys or evokes emotion.
A photograph never captures the view exactly the same as experiencing it in person. It conveys something of the photographers interaction with the scene (think Impressionism). And I enjoy abstract and highly manipulated photos that are completely unidentifiable as to the subject, just as I do an abstract painting.
So, I say let each person do and enjoy and share photography however they want. All approaches are equally valid.

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Jan 10, 2019 08:48:49   #
f8lee
 
Well, the thing those who claim SOOC "is the only way" are obviously ignorant of is that Ansel Adams (and his team) were renowned for his post processing capabilities in the darkroom.

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Jan 10, 2019 08:52:15   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
f8lee wrote:
Well, the thing those who claim SOOC "is the only way" are obviously ignorant of is that Ansel Adams (and his team) were renowned for his post processing capabilities in the darkroom.



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Jan 10, 2019 08:57:33   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
ngrea wrote:
So, I say let each person do and enjoy and share photography however they want. All approaches are equally valid.


Definitely!

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Jan 10, 2019 09:06:47   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
Agree 100% but these types of conversations on UHH - as you've already seen - don't seem to change anyone's beliefs. There appears to be a large contingent of members who have forgotten how much you could and would "edit" via the wet darkroom, and who are judgmental about anything to do with digital photography outside their narrow personal vision. On the other hand, some folks just like to argue!

I feel fortunate to have connected with several talented members here, early in my membership, who encouraged my exploration in the digital darkroom. Now it's a joyful part of the hobby.

The silhouettes in #1 are all home-made "stamp-brushes" made from my own pics



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Jan 10, 2019 09:07:30   #
DaveJ
 
On the digital camera's I have owned the last 10 years, SOOC has post processing done "in camera" before spitting out the results. My current camera body has more adjustments available in camera than I could believe when I first got it and set it up. I read the comments with a laugh as it goes back and forth for and against. Just my opinion.

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Jan 10, 2019 09:39:38   #
JohnSwanda (a regular here)
 
ngrea wrote:
Reading a Hog conversation that gọt a little warm about whether post processing removes the pure “art” from photography. It seems some think photography must be SOOC to be “real”.
It seems to me the post processing could be interpreted as being similar to what a painter or sculptor does. Is a blob of paint SOOT (straight out of the tube) more “authentic” than the final painting the artist does? Is the sculpture of less merit than the block of granite?
The color and the granite are both genuine, and can covey a message without manipulation, but the artist that changes them also brings us something from his/her mind and heart that conveys or evokes emotion.
A photograph never captures the view exactly the same as experiencing it in person. It conveys something of the photographers interaction with the scene (think Impressionism). And I enjoy abstract and highly manipulated photos that are completely unidentifiable as to the subject, just as I do an abstract painting.
So, I say let each person do and enjoy and share photography however they want. All approaches are equally valid.
Reading a Hog conversation that gọt a little warm ... (show quote)


Photography is particularly good at creating an illusion that we are seeing what the eye saw. When photography came along, it freed painters to move towards impressionism and abstraction. At the same time there have always been photographers who went for a more personal vision which isn't limited by trying to reproduce the way our eyes see things. There have been great artists from both schools. For that matter, some photographers use post processing to make their photographs look more like the way their eyes saw the scene.

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Jan 10, 2019 09:50:53   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
DaveJ wrote:
On the digital camera's I have owned the last 10 years, SOOC has post processing done "in camera" before spitting out the results. My current camera body has more adjustments available in camera than I could believe when I first got it and set it up. I read the comments with a laugh as it goes back and forth for and against. Just my opinion.


I believe most people consider "post processing" anything done to the image on the computer after the image leaves the camera.
I suppose you could call the camera set-up as "pre processing", if necessary.
If the camera function was considered post processing, then the only thing that would be SOOC would be the unaltered RAW.

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Jan 10, 2019 10:27:39   #
mcmama
 
[quote=Linda From Maine
The silhouettes in #1 are all home-made "stamp-brushes" made from my own pics [/quote]

What fun that must have been to put together. Very enjoyable to view.

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Jan 10, 2019 11:23:34   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
mcmama wrote:
What fun that must have been to put together. Very enjoyable to view.
Thank you, it was! Amazingly, I didn't worry too much about what the SOOC purists would think while I created it 🤗

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Jan 10, 2019 12:22:03   #
R.G. (a regular here)
 
Professionals and hobbyists typically have different mind-sets, and there's a reason for it. Professionals have to concentrate on giving the client what they're looking for, which typically means working to the highest possible technical standards. Hobbyists, on the other hand, concentrate on whatever they please and only have to suit themselves as far as technical standards are concerned. Most professional photographers aren't in a position where artistic interpretation or creative thinking are required, so it's not something they prioritise. On the other hand, we hobbyists can give ourselves free rein and be as artistic and creative as we want.

From the above observations I have concluded that the creatives can't look to the professionals and assume that they can expect understanding, appreciation and appropriate advice from them. Some professionals can and will show these attributes, but I suspect they are a minority. So the creatives have to be self-reassuring to a point, and have to learn to ignore negative criticisms about technical imperfections because that isn't what the creative prioritises. Some hobbyists aspire to producing professional-level photography so technical standards are important to them, but the creatives march to a different tune. If they can avoid disasters and come away with something usable, that's good enough for them.

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Jan 10, 2019 12:34:30   #
Dr.Nikon (a regular here)
 
Linda mirrors my thoughts as well ..”now its a joyful part of my hobby” ... Post processing is my favorite part of photography .., so much so .. that I get paid for it ...

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Jan 10, 2019 13:08:21   #
alx
 
f8lee wrote:
Well, the thing those who claim SOOC "is the only way" are obviously ignorant of is that Ansel Adams (and his team) were renowned for his post processing capabilities in the darkroom.

Right on!

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Jan 10, 2019 13:42:35   #
dsmeltz (a regular here)
 
ngrea wrote:
Reading a Hog conversation that gọt a little warm about whether post processing removes the pure “art” from photography. It seems some think photography must be SOOC to be “real”.
It seems to me the post processing could be interpreted as being similar to what a painter or sculptor does. Is a blob of paint SOOT (straight out of the tube) more “authentic” than the final painting the artist does? Is the sculpture of less merit than the block of granite?
The color and the granite are both genuine, and can covey a message without manipulation, but the artist that changes them also brings us something from his/her mind and heart that conveys or evokes emotion.
A photograph never captures the view exactly the same as experiencing it in person. It conveys something of the photographers interaction with the scene (think Impressionism). And I enjoy abstract and highly manipulated photos that are completely unidentifiable as to the subject, just as I do an abstract painting.
So, I say let each person do and enjoy and share photography however they want. All approaches are equally valid.
Reading a Hog conversation that gọt a little warm ... (show quote)


For thousands of years three groups have been at the forefront of moving technology ahead. The defense industry, scientists and artists. (Oh, and I guess scientists and artists hired by the defense industry) They all are constantly trying out the new and pushing for more. The so called "pure" art as represented by the SOOC crowd is really static art and rapidly becoming non-art.

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Jan 10, 2019 14:01:39   #
duane klipping
 
SOOC to me is a snapshot with no real vision. SOOC would only be a raw file untouched by processing flat and dull. If a jpeg SOOC then it has been post processed just by the camera as it is a portable processor. I don't understand how those people can get so hung up on the term. If SOOC is that important might as well shoot film with a disposable camera and send it away for processing and wait to see what the developer did to your images.

As far as professionals not being artsy I see plenty of good pros who make artsy images be it portrait, landscape, or other genres.

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