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Cleaning lens contacts on Canon cameras
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Jan 11, 2019 11:03:01   #
larryepage
 

Keep in mind that these articles are comparing the two alcohols based on their use as medical antiseptics, not as cleaning agents or solvents. They are chemically different in important ways, and their physical properties are different. Not necessarily important when disinfecting skin, but really important when cleaning lens contacts.

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Jan 11, 2019 11:21:37   #
DaveO (a regular here)
 
larryepage wrote:
Keep in mind that these articles are comparing the two alcohols based on their use as medical antiseptics, not as cleaning agents or solvents. They are chemically different in important ways, and their physical properties are different. Not necessarily important when disinfecting skin, but really important when cleaning lens contacts.


It should be noted that many of the common uses are interchangeable as far as the average consumer is concerned due to their similarities. Most users probably don't think about a chemical analysis when purchasing these items for their needs nor will they even worry about it for use as a cleaning agent. I would suggest that the average consumer knows they should not be ingested and anything else is relatively unimportant.

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Jan 11, 2019 12:27:13   #
rcarol (a regular here)
 
williejoha wrote:
Anybody that would use any kind of abrasive on lens or camera contacts needs his/her head examined. What a bunch of garbage.
WJH


So you would rule out the use of a Dremel tool with a fine rotary stone?

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Jan 11, 2019 12:37:57   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
Bokehen wrote:
After being in the electronics industry for many years, I've learn that the contacts or leads on many of the PC boards become oxidized. cleaning them with alcohol is one way to correct the issues. But in some cases if the leads are oxidized or even showing signs of corrosion. a very fine grade of sandpaper of extra fine emory board would be used. If the corrosion has went deeper into the lens or contacts, this would require a complete tear down of the lens to access the issue. I recall once that we had to re-coat the leads on several PC boards with solder. Not saying you should do this. but cleaning or light sanding would be the first step.
After being in the electronics industry for many y... (show quote)


Lens contacts are spring loaded, and gold plated. Abrasion will RUIN the gold plating and damage the tiny, spring-loaded pins. These pins do not become oxidized, but they do get oily from camera lubricants, finger oils, and using the wrong type of alcohol to clean them.

What works on PC boards is not going to work on lenses.

Do not use abrasives (erasers, sand paper). Do not use rubbing alcohol. Some rubbing alcohols contain lanolin or other impurities that are good for rubbing skin, bad for cleaning electronics. MOST are 30% water, which is not good.

DO use 91% or more concentrated isopropyl or methyl alcohol, or a mix of both. Hopefully, you will buy a product that is made specifically for cleaning photographic equipment. Zeiss Photo Wipes and Photosol eWipes and Pec Pads are a few of the better choices.

OH, keep that stuff off your fingers. It leeches all the oils out of your skin! Wear acrylonitrile gloves.

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Jan 11, 2019 13:09:44   #
GoofyNewfie
 
rcarol wrote:
So you would rule out the use of a Dremel tool with a fine rotary stone?


I though this one would work faster



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Jan 11, 2019 13:13:20   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
GoofyNewfie wrote:
I though this one would work faster


REALLLYy fast!!!

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Jan 11, 2019 13:49:47   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
GoofyNewfie wrote:
I though this one would work faster


Awww, that's cute!

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Jan 11, 2019 13:55:54   #
GoofyNewfie
 
burkphoto wrote:
Awww, that's cute!


If you’re going to ruin a contact, might as well use this. Emory cloth takes too long.

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Jan 11, 2019 13:56:43   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
GoofyNewfie wrote:
If you’re going to ruin a contact, might as well use this. Emory cloth takes too long.



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Jan 11, 2019 14:38:08   #
PHRubin (a regular here)
 
rcarol wrote:
Another poster claimed that gold contacts don't oxidize. Just pointing out what else has been stated


No - but gold plate can be removed exposing a layer that can. Then there is beryllium/copper that appears like gold.

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Jan 11, 2019 15:06:39   #
Dikdik
 
Next thing I'd expect is someone suggesting a 5" right angle grinder... but, you have to be careful and use a light touch... I would not use abrasives anywhere near a circuit board...

Dik

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Jan 11, 2019 15:12:30   #
Dikdik
 
PHRubin wrote:
No - but gold plate can be removed exposing a layer that can. Then there is beryllium/copper that appears like gold.


Beryllium-copper does form an oxide layer; it has an incredible long fatigue life and could be used for spring contacts. Some high end target rifles used to use beryllium-copper for firing pins... my Anschutz used to have this material.

Dik

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Jan 11, 2019 15:20:26   #
DaveO (a regular here)
 
All materials oxidize...the time involved varies.

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Jan 11, 2019 15:29:25   #
williejoha
 
If nothing else it could justify taking care of your GAS attack. What the heck it' s one way of doing it. Oh what fun we are having today. Good cheers and keep smiling.
WJH

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Jan 11, 2019 15:32:46   #
DaveO (a regular here)
 
williejoha wrote:
If nothing else it could justify taking care of your GAS attack. What the heck it' s one way of doing it. Oh what fun we are having today. Good cheers and keep smiling.
WJH


Are you waiting for Scotty to beam you up?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KyUQCqjcEU

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