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Cleaning lens contacts on Canon cameras
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Jan 10, 2019 11:47:38   #
imagemeister (a regular here)
 
Dikdik wrote:
Q-tips leave fibres... best to use something else.

Dik


Then blow them away...

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Jan 10, 2019 11:49:30   #
imagemeister (a regular here)
 
AndyH wrote:
And even the gentlest variety of Mother's contains abrasives, in this case microgrit.

Andy


Yes, that's why I would use it ....

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Jan 10, 2019 12:01:27   #
RichardSM (a regular here)
 
GoofyNewfie wrote:
Getting an error code to clean contacts. Anyone have luck doing it yourself? What did you use?
I’ve tried in the past but never had positive results. Cleaned both lens and body contact. Wound up sending to Canon. Now a friend is asking.
Thanks!


Clean both camera and lens contacts with alcohol on a QTip rub lightly and don’t soak the QTip either just a little!

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Jan 10, 2019 12:59:18   #
PHRubin (a regular here)
 
rcarol wrote:
Rubber eraser from a pencil.

I was in the electronic industry. High tech stuff, including space levels of quality control (TV satellites). We found that while erasers cleaned the contacts, they removed the surface layer designed to minimize oxidation. This resulted in frequent need to re-clean contacts and was thus prohibited.

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Jan 10, 2019 13:23:47   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
PHRubin wrote:
I was in the electronic industry. High tech stuff, including space levels of quality control (TV satellites). We found that while erasers cleaned the contacts, they removed the surface layer designed to minimize oxidation. This resulted in frequent need to re-clean contacts and was thus prohibited.



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Jan 10, 2019 13:26:16   #
rcarol (a regular here)
 
PHRubin wrote:
I was in the electronic industry. High tech stuff, including space levels of quality control (TV satellites). We found that while erasers cleaned the contacts, they removed the surface layer designed to minimize oxidation. This resulted in frequent need to re-clean contacts and was thus prohibited.


Another poster claimed that gold contacts don't oxidize. Just pointing out what else has been stated

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Jan 10, 2019 13:27:22   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
rcarol wrote:
Another poster claimed that gold contacts don't oxidize. Just pointing out what else has been stated


Surface layer of gold...

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Jan 10, 2019 13:28:29   #
rcarol (a regular here)
 
Longshadow wrote:
Surface layer of gold...


Surface layer of gold? Not sure what you mean.

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Jan 10, 2019 13:33:39   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
rcarol wrote:
Surface layer of gold? Not sure what you mean.


Gold is plated onto the base metal (PC board traces, connectors, etc.), so the gold is on the surface. If the gold was sprayed, plated, etc. with anything else, that material would tarnish or insulate, unless mating the contacts scraped it off of the gold plating. The plating top layer is gold.
Gold is the least reactive metal we have, that is why it is used.

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Jan 10, 2019 13:39:27   #
Dikdik (a regular here)
 
From:

https://www.sharrettsplating.com/blog/gold-plated-electrical-contacts/

Plating contacts with gold provides:
• Exceptional corrosion protection: Gold is among the metals that are least susceptible to oxidation. This occurs when iron — or an alloy containing iron — combines with oxygen and moisture and ultimately produces corrosion. Therefore, gold plating electrical contacts can offer a viable solution for applications where rust prevention is essential.
• Increased electrical conductivity: The formation of surface oxides can also inhibit the contact’s ability to conduct electricity. Gold’s anti-oxidation properties prevent this from occurring. They also produce a smooth finish that enables a solid connection with the mated surface.
• Ease of coating application: When electroplating any metal onto electrical contacts, it is imperative that only a very thin coating is applied. Thick coatings will negatively impact contact performance. Gold is one of the most malleable metals, making it easy to apply a very thin coating onto the surface. The fact that only a thin layer of gold is required also helps to minimize the cost.
• Enhanced durability: Gold provides excellent resistance against normal wear and tear, which can lengthen the contacts’ lifespan.
• Excellent heat protection: For electrical products routinely exposed to elevated temperatures, gold provides superior protection against damage causes by excessive heat.
• No fretting degradation: Gold is not susceptible to fretting, which is the gradual wearing away of the contact surface due to rubbing or friction.

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Jan 10, 2019 13:43:33   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
Dikdik wrote:
From:

https://www.sharrettsplating.com/blog/gold-plated-electrical-contacts/

Plating contacts with gold provides:
• Exceptional corrosion protection: Gold is among the metals that are least susceptible to oxidation. This occurs when iron — or an alloy containing iron — combines with oxygen and moisture and ultimately produces corrosion. Therefore, gold plating electrical contacts can offer a viable solution for applications where rust prevention is essential.
• Increased electrical conductivity: The formation of surface oxides can also inhibit the contact’s ability to conduct electricity. Gold’s anti-oxidation properties prevent this from occurring. They also produce a smooth finish that enables a solid connection with the mated surface.
• Ease of coating application: When electroplating any metal onto electrical contacts, it is imperative that only a very thin coating is applied. Thick coatings will negatively impact contact performance. Gold is one of the most malleable metals, making it easy to apply a very thin coating onto the surface. The fact that only a thin layer of gold is required also helps to minimize the cost.
• Enhanced durability: Gold provides excellent resistance against normal wear and tear, which can lengthen the contacts’ lifespan.
• Excellent heat protection: For electrical products routinely exposed to elevated temperatures, gold provides superior protection against damage causes by excessive heat.
• No fretting degradation: Gold is not susceptible to fretting, which is the gradual wearing away of the contact surface due to rubbing or friction.
From: br br https://www.sharrettsplating.com/blog... (show quote)


Was not aware of the no fretting, thanks!
(I still would not be keen on useing a pencil eraser though.)

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Jan 10, 2019 14:45:03   #
Bigmike1 (a regular here)
 
I was going to say pencil eraser but I see that it has already been suggested. (:

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Jan 10, 2019 15:29:53   #
sirlensalot
 
Zeiss lens wipes. Box of 100 for $5 when on sale at walmart.

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Jan 10, 2019 15:42:00   #
Dikdik (a regular here)
 
Longshadow wrote:
(I still would not be keen on useing a pencil eraser though.)


Same here... often use coffee filters and alcohol for cleaning 'conductive goo' from between coolers and processors. Any proper lens tissue should be great, although may not has as rough a surface as a coffee filter... coffee filters do not leave 'lint'.

Dik

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Jan 10, 2019 17:49:21   #
wufelo
 
Quicktee wrote:
never use an eraser!! the little particles can get inside of the camera and cause more problems.micro fiber with some 70percent isopropyl alcohol will do the trick


I recently had same proloem on T6S...........Turn off camera...Remove battery Put back in...Turn On Proloem Solved.............

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