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Jan 9, 2019 04:21:42   #
catchlight.. (a regular here)
 
100 ISO and a tripod.


(Download)

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Jan 10, 2019 00:47:19   #
dat2ra
 
One thing that is happening is due to cities installing high color temperature (ca. 5700 degree K) LED streetlights, sadly in historic districts. They do this because they think such lights provide "better" illumination; they do not. The lumens of brightness are independent of color temp. You see this same effect in auto headlights: the glarey blue-white light vs. the yellowish "warm" white lights. So, your photos are picking this up by overexposing the high-K streetlights. This gives a funky over/under exposure look. Adjusting the white balance to a higher (5200 or so) would reduce this effect.

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Jan 10, 2019 05:34:29   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
dat2ra wrote:
One thing that is happening is due to cities installing high color temperature (ca. 5700 degree K) LED streetlights, sadly in historic districts. They do this because they think such lights provide "better" illumination; they do not. The lumens of brightness are independent of color temp. You see this same effect in auto headlights: the glarey blue-white light vs. the yellowish "warm" white lights. So, your photos are picking this up by overexposing the high-K streetlights. This gives a funky over/under exposure look. Adjusting the white balance to a higher (5200 or so) would reduce this effect.
One thing that is happening is due to cities insta... (show quote)


The conversion to LED is NOT better illumination.
It is for a substantial savings in electricity usage.
I do almost all designs now with LED lighting because of this and allows me to meet the new energy codes as well.
And yes the savings is substantial as I have a client that has the same building in both LED and fluorescent lighting in the same area and monitored the new one in comparison to the old one for a period of 2 years.

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Jan 10, 2019 13:41:12   #
Thomas902 (a regular here)
 
"...There was too much flair from the street lights..." pdsilen you are likely shooting with the 18-50mm at or near max aperture (wide open). That Sigma apparently does not handle CA (Chromatic Aberration) gracefully... CA in most consumer grade optics improves dramatically when stopped down to f/8 to f/11 where diffraction starts to take it's toll.... try this scene at f/8, k?

Sadly you are not going to be able to hand hold even with Image Stabilization... Think tripod and follow the advice others have provided... btw. bracketing is your friend here... as is HDR (high dynamic range software) albeit there is a learning curve in the effective application of HDR...

Also if you have a "protective" filter on the 18-50mm please be certain to remove it for night scenes...
That "extra" layer of glass can be a bad actor in high contrast scenarios such as this...

Hope this helps...
All the best on your journey...

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Jan 11, 2019 19:07:50   #
dat2ra
 
Architect1776: What I intended to say was that the justification for chosing high color temperature LED (5200+K) vs. low color temp (ca. 3200K) is stated as "better illumination". Considering your profession, you certainly know that this is not true. My city uses the high-K lights in both commercial and historic residential for this "reason" but actually, they echew more appropriate low-K lights in the historic district because they do not want to have to have two kinds of lights. Low-K lights cost the same cost and put out the same amount (lumens) of light as the glarey, blue-white lights that are used at Walmart parking lots, industrial plants, freeways, and our local prison.

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Jan 11, 2019 23:24:24   #
SWFeral (a regular here)
 
Where did you go wrong? You went wrong in Roswell.

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Jan 24, 2019 07:31:49   #
robertjsmith
 
You can't do a lot with the high humidity of the environment, try adjusting the contrast to highlight the glow.
To me that would make it a little more dramatic. Otherwise I think it's a good shot

Bob

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