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Imperial moth
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Dec 31, 2018 22:43:28   #
newtoyou (a regular here)
 
I use the basic technique used by Mark, but with refinements. Peat instead of soil is one difference. Keeps mildew down. I think that is what causes hi mortality.
I think some of the close-ups are macro, if not I ask forgiveness. I will not do that again this year.
Obtain eggs. The how is another subject. They feed on many trees, but Liquidumbar(sweet, or star gum, parent of gumballs) is preferred. Start first instar larva on the tenderest leaves, cleaned, examined for bugs, collected away from a busy road. I use butter tubs with small holes in lid to hold twigs in water. Small holes, larva will crawl in and drown if to large. No cage needed first two instars, then I use a nylon pet carrier for a cage.no more than five or six to a small carrier. Change food BEFORE PREVIOUS IS EATEN for best results. Allow larva to crawl into new food. DO NOT FORCE, allow them to move. Same if you want to hold one, put the leaf in your hand and let it crawl on, reverse for off. You will injure animal easily. A week after last instar shed, they get nervous, start to roam, change color, darkens. The heart becomes a prominent vein down the back.
Put one only in a plastic shoe box with two inches milled spagnum, dampened and wrung dry. It will dig in and pupate. In two weeks carefully dig up and put it in a comunal overwinter shoebox, one inch peat, pupa a couple inches apart, then an inch or spagnum. Refrigerate till mid May (in Maryland) and remove from fridge. Dig up. One pupa to a clean plastic shoe box on paper towels with a small branch. Barely mist daily. DO NOT SOAK. No I let mine eclose in the house. Timed right, this can be perpetuated. Excess released if it was local in origin.
If pictures are not up to snuff, I hope content is at least interesting.
Thanks for the pleasant company the past year. My success rate after pupation over 75%. Before pupation, maybe 25-30%. Highest mortality in first two instars.
Bill


(Download)


(Download)
Up close male feathery antenna
Up close male feathery antenna...
(Download)
This is specimen above, part of pupal shell stuck. I removed it.
This is specimen above, part of pupal shell stuck....
(Download)

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Jan 1, 2019 06:12:44   #
EnglishBrenda (a regular here)
 
What good camo this moth has, shape and color make it look like a dead leaf but beautiful at the same time. Thanks for the information.

On a different topic which I have been meaning to mention for a while now, get that canon 65 lens out of the wardrobe and start using it or I will come and steal it

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Jan 1, 2019 09:34:43   #
newtoyou (a regular here)
 
EnglishBrenda wrote:
What good camo this moth has, shape and color make it look like a dead leaf but beautiful at the same time. Thanks for the information.

On a different topic which I have been meaning to mention for a while now, get that canon 65 lens out of the wardrobe and start using it or I will come and steal it


I have used it a bit. Nothing very impressive. Am waiting on a Yuongo dual flash similar to the Canon MT 24ex. Another week or so. Thanks for the word of encouragement, I tend to lazyness in winter.
England has some beautiful Saterniids. They may be reared with the same methods. The beauty of a newly eclosed moth never ceases to awe me.
Carpe annos singulos novus.
Bill

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Jan 1, 2019 09:58:07   #
EnglishBrenda (a regular here)
 
I may try rearing something then and I will be interested to see how the yongnuo performs. I have an ordinary Yongnuo flash and triggers which I have found to be very reliable.
Those who have the E65 lens seem to find it quite 'off putting' at first but once they become practised in its use they love it.
A successful New Year to you.

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Jan 1, 2019 10:22:53   #
Mark Sturtevant (a regular here)
 
Actually, I have not raised this particular species. I was thinking of the closely related royal moth -- that is the more southerly species. The imperial moth does range farther north, and so it seems reasonable to be able to refridgerate over winter. But not the royal moth, as far as I have seen.

Strongly agree the peat moss bedding should be an improvement. One other positive about it is that it holds moisture much better than would soil. 👍

Brenda, the Yonguo twin flash is deservedly very popular and you should have much fun with it. I can't help but give advice whether needed or not: For Saturniids, it is best to photograph in the few hours after they eclose, which is when they are not inclined to fly or fly far. Then they may be photographed in a staged shot outdoors, with caution. After that they can go 'bye bye' on you.

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Jan 1, 2019 10:27:02   #
EnglishBrenda (a regular here)
 
Mark Sturtevant wrote:
Actually, I have not raised this particular species. I was thinking of the closely related royal moth -- that is the more southerly species. The imperial moth does range farther north, and so it seems reasonable to be able to refridgerate over winter. But not the royal moth, as far as I have seen.

Strongly agree the peat moss bedding should be an improvement. One other positive about it is that it holds moisture much better than would soil. 👍

Brenda, the Yonguo twin flash is deservedly very popular and you should have much fun with it. I can't help but give advice whether needed or not: For Saturniids, it is best to photograph in the few hours after they eclose, which is when they are not inclined to fly or fly far. Then they may be photographed in a staged shot outdoors, with caution. After that they can go 'bye bye' on you.
Actually, I have not raised this particular specie... (show quote)


Thanks Mark for the info.

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Jan 1, 2019 14:26:07   #
napabob (a regular here)
 
good info and thanks for sharing

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Jan 1, 2019 19:02:45   #
newtoyou (a regular here)
 
Mark Sturtevant wrote:
Actually, I have not raised this particular species. I was thinking of the closely related royal moth -- that is the more southerly species. The imperial moth does range farther north, and so it seems reasonable to be able to refridgerate over winter. But not the royal moth, as far as I have seen.

Strongly agree the peat moss bedding should be an improvement. One other positive about it is that it holds moisture much better than would soil. 👍

Brenda, the Yonguo twin flash is deservedly very popular and you should have much fun with it. I can't help but give advice whether needed or not: For Saturniids, it is best to photograph in the few hours after they eclose, which is when they are not inclined to fly or fly far. Then they may be photographed in a staged shot outdoors, with caution. After that they can go 'bye bye' on you.
Actually, I have not raised this particular specie... (show quote)

I think how I do this may prevent damage to each other in digging. I burried some, only to have them dig out. By June here, a tethered female, freshly eclosed, will almost always attract a mate. Her eggs go to next year's brood. The pH of the peat inhibits mold. Nothing to start this year ,tho, so I will be looking harder for brood stock.
G'nite Mark.
Bill

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