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End of an Era
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Dec 21, 2018 10:41:59   #
dmagett
 
Nobody? Nikon still does! The F6 and the FM10

camerapapi wrote:
Digital is convenient and its image quality is excellent. I know of a retired wedding photographer that was using Hasselblad cameras and Zeiss lenses for his job and one day I was admiring a beautiful 20x30 image of a bride with excellent resolution and no grain that he had in his studio. When I told him that the quality of a Hasselblad with Zeiss lenses were simply awesome he laughed at me and he told me that the image came from a digital Canon and it was not a professional camera. After that I began to believe more in digital photography.
I like to shoot film but today it is not as convenient like it was in the past. For sure I do not feel like going back to the optical darkroom again. Monochrome images have been my passion and I feel I can do better with conversions than what I used to do in the past and by the way, I can do it better than I did in the darkroom.
I see one big advantage with medium and large format and it is the resolution of even small details that in my humble opinion is superior to digital.
There must be a reason why nobody today makes a film camera.
Digital is convenient and its image quality is exc... (show quote)

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Dec 21, 2018 11:21:43   #
Silverman
 
End of an Era for a large number of Photographer's, although some want to hang on to the Film Era, which is just fine. But I must admit and say, "Digital Photography" is a new Technology that has improved Photography. Also in my thinking, it is Easier and more enjoyable. My thoughts, and maybe others have another view.

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Dec 21, 2018 11:49:10   #
Rickyb
 
Problem with film cameras is there were never enough zooms. Most fixed focal. I notice this when I digitalized many slides and film. You had to change lenses and carry a ton of fixed focal lens. With dig your have your choice for composition and printing. Most slides were not meant for printing.

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Dec 21, 2018 13:44:40   #
Vienna74
 
I switched to digital in about 2001. However, a few years ago I realized I was shooting digital as a film guy. The biggest improvement in my digital work came after this as I worked hard to take advantage of digital's differences from film.

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Dec 21, 2018 14:44:17   #
E.L.. Shapiro (a regular here)
 
For those who wish to continue in film photography there is still a niche- some folks are still into it and there is a niche market to service their needs. There is still some film and chemistry being manufactured although it is a small percentage of the plethora of products that once existed. There might be a few film cameras still being produced, probably at a premium price and there are enough old ones around, I'm sure, to last many generations before they entirely disappear. There are some photographers engaged in working with obsolete processes such as wet plate, tintype, dye transfer and more- some for artistic effects and others for their interest in the antiquarian issues of photography. Practically nothing in photography is completely dead or irretrievable other than a few materials and proprietary processes such as Kodachrome and C-22 chemistry etc. There are folks out there a that are still mixing"scratch" chemicals and formulas like Pyro developer.

The mainstream, however, has shifted mostly to digital photography and although there are so many folks who pine for the "good old days, I find that so much of that is false nostalgia. Granted, "film" may have a certain "look or feel" but there is hardly an look, effect or feel that can't be replicated in digital photography AND many more creative possibilities. I am not a lazy photgraher and I did spend a good part of my life in the traditional darkroom- I enjoyed it and always took pride in the craftsmanship involved but frankly, I don't miss all the muss and fuss, maintenance, toxic chemistry and long involved procedures.

Perhas the physics, mechanics and chemistry have changed radically but the ART and creative potential has not changed at all. The basic controls- aperture, shutter speed, and focus are still very much the same. Optics have improved but the basics are still the basics.
Light is still light, physically and aesthetically and composition, concepts, storytelling, artistry and creativity are strictly in the domain of the photographer- not the technology.

So...don't feel bad about abandoning film- you can always go back to it if you are so inclined and or you can progress and have just as much fun in digital photography.

The only thing that suffered, for me, in my transition into digital was my bank account! In my commercial studio, a fully equipped black and white and a complete color lab, eventually found its way into the dumpster and the price of cameras and lenses just ain't what they used to be even when you calculate in pre-inflation dollars. Progress can be expensive!

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Dec 21, 2018 15:32:09   #
latebloomer
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
With out going into detail the era of using film camera has come an end for me. It sad I have to this, but I have to move on. I not stop taking picture. I found still in the box a Samsung Digimax 530 ( I known it belong in a museum), It a good point for me to begin using digital camera. From my years of using film camera I find myself already taking that knowledge from film camera to use this camera. Good Xmas to all


You are fortunate to be shooting film before digital. You will have a much greater grasp of exposure, focusing, composition, etc. than those starting out with digital first. I tell myself that sometimes there is an advantage being the "Old Fart" that I am.

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Dec 21, 2018 16:18:57   #
Curmudgeon (a regular here)
 
I shot film for over 60 years with various cameras. I got into Digital Photograph about six months ago and got trapped. One of the things that delayed my going digital was the fear that I would cease to be the careful picture taker I had become. I am a hunter. I stalk and capture my prey on film or pixels. Yesterday morning I was out walking when I saw hawk in a tree. In the film days I would have taken the initial shot then began a careful stalk. If I got close enough I would take the shot and if the shutter/mirror noise did not scare it away I would take two bracketing shots. This morning? Check the D7200 to be sure the auto bracket function is turned on. Take a bracketed trio then begin my stalk. Since film price and processing cost no longer apply, I then do the following: The bird looks a little uneasy, freeze in place, slowly raise the camera and take a three shot bracket. Wait until the bird calms down, continue my stalk. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. The bird flushes and even though I have taken 73 shots. I miss the take off.

I go back home, download the shots into Lightroom to cull and sort. I have three keepers that are well focused and (almost) correctly exposed. I would not have kept them in the film days but I have PP now. Do I miss film? Everyday. Will I go back to film? I still play with film but change back, never. I have been seduced by the force. If I take enough shots some of them have to be good, right? Remember the monkeys and the typewriters?

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Dec 21, 2018 17:05:20   #
mniblick
 
I just returned from a vacation where I packed two thumbnail-sized 128 GB SD cards instead if 20 rolls of film in various foil pouches. Digital photography is the good kind of progress. I plan to keep my film camera for the days when I get nostalgic for the smell of a freshly opened can of film.

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Dec 21, 2018 17:07:10   #
E.L.. Shapiro (a regular here)
 
latebloomer wrote:
You are fortunate to be shooting film before digital. You will have a much greater grasp of exposure, focusing, composition, etc. than those starting out with digital first. I tell myself that sometimes there is an advantage being the "Old Fart" that I am.


There is absolutely no logical reason why a serious newcomer to photography can not learn all the important rudiments and basics in the current digital era. Event he most advances, super-automated full featured cameras can be set to manual operation and bypass most of the automated modes if the photographer is so inclined. Besides, the automated features are conveniences that facilitate more precise camera operation but they needn't stymie real technical prowess or creativity- they shoud actually stimulate those attributes.

True enough, there are many old methodologies that experienced photograhers and recognize that there are parallels and equivalents that the quickly apply to the newer technologies. There is no reason why all the finer points can not be learned from "scratch" in the current era.

I don't know why there is so much SELF IMPOSED ageism on this site- I read it every day and can not relate to it. I am just about as "old as dirt" but I still work full time in photography- it's my job! I make it my business to keep up with all the new trends and latest innovations and, at least, investigate whatever I think I can use or apply.

I've noticed that many of the members idolize and just about canonize many of the iconic photograhers of the past- and some are still with us. Most of them worked well into their"old age"- Ansel Adams, Yosef Karsh, Alfred Eisenstaetd, Peter Gowland, Henri Cartier Bresson, Richard Avadon, Philippe Haslman, and the list goes on. Harry Garfield worked into his 80s and he suffered from a serious sight impairment but his work was nonetheless outstanding!

In our "culture" too many folks equate old age with obsolesce, disability, "over the hill". "has been" etc. Other cultures see age as wisdom, experience, sagely advice, worldliness. I prefer the latter- Roger dat!

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Dec 21, 2018 17:55:10   #
latebloomer
 
E.L.. Shapiro wrote:
There is absolutely no logical reason why a serious newcomer to photography can not learn all the important rudiments and basics in the current digital era. Event he most advances, super-automated full featured cameras can be set to manual operation and bypass most of the automated modes if the photographer is so inclined. Besides, the automated features are conveniences that facilitate more precise camera operation but they needn't stymie real technical prowess or creativity- they shoud actually stimulate those attributes.

True enough, there are many old methodologies that experienced photograhers and recognize that there are parallels and equivalents that the quickly apply to the newer technologies. There is no reason why all the finer points can not be learned from "scratch" in the current era.

I don't know why there is so much SELF IMPOSED ageism on this site- I read it every day and can not relate to it. I am just about as "old as dirt" but I still work full time in photography- it's my job! I make it my business to keep up with all the new trends and latest innovations and, at least, investigate whatever I think I can use or apply.

I've noticed that many of the members idolize and just about canonize many of the iconic photograhers of the past- and some are still with us. Most of them worked well into their"old age"- Ansel Adams, Yosef Karsh, Alfred Eisenstaetd, Peter Gowland, Henri Cartier Bresson, Richard Avadon, Philippe Haslman, and the list goes on. Harry Garfield worked into his 80s and he suffered from a serious sight impairment but his work was nonetheless outstanding!

In our "culture" too many folks equate old age with obsolesce, disability, "over the hill". "has been" etc. Other cultures see age as wisdom, experience, sagely advice, worldliness. I prefer the latter- Roger dat!
There is absolutely no logical reason why a seriou... (show quote)


My reply was a joke. I'm sorry you did not get it.
I believe the inability to laugh at ourselves is a great detriment to our and society's well being.

I do not believe that one must have analog before digital. I would not recommend someone in these times try analog before digital.For those of us who have been through the analog era, we have some advantages when going to digital over those who are just starting out in digital.

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Dec 21, 2018 22:58:01   #
LCD
 
The one think I miss about film photography is the discipline you learned when you only had, at most, 36 shots on a roll of film. When developing and printing were laborious and expensive activities. You waited for the right moment, you considered the factors. No, I wouldn't go back, but it is harder to gain that discipline with today's camera.

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Dec 21, 2018 23:25:56   #
E.L.. Shapiro (a regular here)
 
latebloomer wrote:
My reply was a joke. I'm sorry you did not get it.
I believe the inability to laugh at ourselves is a great detriment to our and society's well being.

I do not believe that one must have analog before digital. I would not recommend someone in these times try analog before digital.For those of us who have been through the analog era, we have some advantages when going to digital over those who are just starting out in digital.


😀You are right about laughter! We have several mirrors in my house. I get to laugh at myself frequently. I don't know if this contributes to society but the endorphins feel great! Merry Christmas 🎅!

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Dec 21, 2018 23:50:54   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
LCD wrote:
The one think I miss about film photography is the discipline you learned when you only had, at most, 36 shots on a roll of film. When developing and printing were laborious and expensive activities. You waited for the right moment, you considered the factors. No, I wouldn't go back, but it is harder to gain that discipline with today's camera.


One person’s discipline is another’s inhibition. I found digital VERY liberating after 40 years of using film.

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Dec 22, 2018 01:38:46   #
JD750 (a regular here)
 
ed2056 wrote:
I couldn't have said it better. My sentiments exactly. The time it takes to set up (using large format) and compose makes me stop and look around and possibly see something I might have missed.


Exactly!

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Dec 22, 2018 05:07:44   #
dat2ra
 
I too used to shoot film, mainly 2 1/4 b/w and Kodachrome slides but have been purely digital for years. Although Photoshop and Lightroom are amazing, they lack the magic and ceremony of the darkroom image appearing in the tray. But I sure don't mind not having to store all those proofs and slide sheets. And the instant gratification of knowing I have great images before leaving the scene is priceless.

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