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How to shoot long exposure photos during the daytime.
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Oct 10, 2018 08:14:58   #
alby
 
...............he now says they were OVER exposed......... so to long already........ need to start over.

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Oct 10, 2018 08:16:37   #
Linda From Maine
 
GKR wrote:
I meant to say that I get over exposure shots, not under exposure shots.
Over-exposure means image is too light/washed out. Is that what you're getting?

If you are over-exposing, then your time is too long. Set camera to manual mode. Set aperture and ISO as you mentioned: f/22, ISO 100 (make sure ISO is fixed at 100, not floating in auto).

Now just adjust your shutter speed. If image is over-exposed (too bright), do shorter exposure time, if image is under-exposed (too dark), do longer exposure time. Do this in increments and an orderly fashion, not random! You already mentioned you're in bulb mode, so you will need a stopwatch or other way to do the timing.

Note the person who posted pic on page 1 said that exposure took two minutes, so that would be a good place to start since that person also was f/22 at ISO 100. I'm guessing you either have your terms confused, or your ISO is on auto.

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Oct 10, 2018 08:21:11   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
For those who missed the OP's correction:

I'm so sorry that my main email was wrong. I meant to say that I get over exposure shots, not under exposure shots


---

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Oct 10, 2018 10:19:20   #
blackest
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
Over-exposure means image is too light/washed out. Is that what you're getting?

If you are over-exposing, then your time is too long. Set camera to manual mode. Set aperture and ISO as you mentioned: f/22, ISO 100 (make sure ISO is fixed at 100, not floating in auto).

Now just adjust your shutter speed. If image is over-exposed (too bright), do shorter exposure time, if image is under-exposed (too dark), do longer exposure time. Do this in increments and an orderly fashion, not random! You already mentioned you're in bulb mode, so you will need a stopwatch or other way to do the timing.

Note the person who posted pic on page 1 said that exposure took two minutes, so that would be a good place to start since that person also was f/22 at ISO 100. I'm guessing you either have your terms confused, or your ISO is on auto.
Over-exposure means image is too light/washed out.... (show quote)


The problem is the sunny day... using the sunny 16 rule f16 1/100th ISO 100 so with the 10 stop filter the exposure should be around 15 to 20 seconds. 2 Minutes would be around 3 stops over exposed... I think the Op needs more ND filter or a duller day.

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Oct 10, 2018 10:29:50   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
Over-exposure means image is too light/washed out. Is that what you're getting?

If you are over-exposing, then your time is too long. Set camera to manual mode. Set aperture and ISO as you mentioned: f/22, ISO 100 (make sure ISO is fixed at 100, not floating in auto).

Now just adjust your shutter speed. If image is over-exposed (too bright), do shorter exposure time, if image is under-exposed (too dark), do longer exposure time. Do this in increments and an orderly fashion, not random! You already mentioned you're in bulb mode, so you will need a stopwatch or other way to do the timing.

Note the person who posted pic on page 1 said that exposure took two minutes, so that would be a good place to start since that person also was f/22 at ISO 100. I'm guessing you either have your terms confused, or your ISO is on auto.
Over-exposure means image is too light/washed out.... (show quote)


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Oct 10, 2018 10:51:18   #
JohnSwanda (a regular here)
 
blackest wrote:
The problem is the sunny day... using the sunny 16 rule f16 1/100th ISO 100 so with the 10 stop filter the exposure should be around 15 to 20 seconds. 2 Minutes would be around 3 stops over exposed... I think the Op needs more ND filter or a duller day.


We still haven't heard what exposure times the OP was trying. He was asked, but never replied.

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Oct 10, 2018 10:57:43   #
Linda From Maine
 
blackest wrote:
The problem is the sunny day... using the sunny 16 rule f16 1/100th ISO 100 so with the 10 stop filter the exposure should be around 15 to 20 seconds. 2 Minutes would be around 3 stops over exposed... I think the Op needs more ND filter or a duller day.
JohnSwanda wrote:
We still haven't heard what exposure times the OP was trying. He was asked, but never replied.
At f/22 and one minute, he'd be in the ballpark, correct? Especially if shooting in raw? But, as usual, we (yes, me too, lol) are just throwing out ideas without knowing all the information - not just as JohnSwanda points out, what shutter speeds were already tried and whether he confirmed that both ISO and aperture remained fixed, but also what final "look" the OP wants. I'm assuming he's after silky water, but to what degree, and does he realize this will make moving boats become ghosts?

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Oct 10, 2018 12:23:11   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
The OP camera shutter speed is maxed out at 30 seconds. At 30 seconds, ISO 100 and f/22 and 10 stop ND filter in the brightest sun condition is only overexposed by a half stop. So my guess is that the OP ND filter is not 10 stops but rather less.

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Oct 10, 2018 12:27:29   #
Linda From Maine
 
BebuLamar wrote:
The OP camera shutter speed is maxed out at 30 seconds. At 30 seconds, ISO 100 and f/22 and 10 stop ND filter in the brightest sun condition is only overexposed by a half stop. So my guess is that the OP ND filter is not 10 stops but rather less.
In the opening he says, "I am in the bulb mode." But he later mentioned trying "manual mode" also....
Next guess? Let's keep the line moving, folks!

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Oct 10, 2018 13:00:41   #
speters (a regular here)
 
GKR wrote:
Hello, my name is Gary. I'm having a hard time trying to figure out how to shoot long exposure shots during the day. I have google it and watched 4-5 different video on how to do it. But, all I get are under exposure. I shoot with a canon 6d, I'm in the bulb mode, f22, iso 100 and I'm using a 10 stop sd filter. Tell me if I'm missing anything. Now, I have been shooting boats on the river, with no shade around me at all, should that make a difference. Can long exposure shot be taken in bright day light with only a 10 stop sd filter, I don't know? Is there anyone out there that can help me.

Thank you
Hello, my name is Gary. I'm having a hard time try... (show quote)

A 10 stop is certainly strong, I've done long exposures with a lot less and with larger apertures! If you're still underexposed, just leave the shutter open for longer, 'til you find your sweet spot (you're already in bulb)!

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Oct 10, 2018 13:08:52   #
JohnSwanda (a regular here)
 
speters wrote:
A 10 stop is certainly strong, I've done long exposures with a lot less and with larger apertures! If you're still underexposed, just leave the shutter open for longer, 'til you find your sweet spot (you're already in bulb)!


If you would read the entire thread (only 2 pages) you would know the OP made an error and meant to say his images were overexposed.

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Oct 10, 2018 17:20:29   #
blackest
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
At f/22 and one minute, he'd be in the ballpark, correct? Especially if shooting in raw? But, as usual, we (yes, me too, lol) are just throwing out ideas without knowing all the information - not just as JohnSwanda points out, what shutter speeds were already tried and whether he confirmed that both ISO and aperture remained fixed, but also what final "look" the OP wants. I'm assuming he's after silky water, but to what degree, and does he realize this will make moving boats become ghosts?
At f/22 and one minute, he'd be in the ballpark, c... (show quote)


Sunny 16 is a great guideline for exposure but it gets tricky as 1/100th is not on the regular full stop list. Easy if you want to shorten exposure times 1/125th is easier to work with and only a third of a stop out.

or use this table
https://www.scantips.com/lights/evchart.html#chart


If you are correctly exposing a midtone you don't get very much latitude before it's white or black.



Describe your scene in 5 stops or less :) This may be my favourite picture.

each row is a stop (raw can usually record 1 stop higher and you can recover that detail in post, you can't do that with a jpeg)

Lets say 15 seconds is the exposure with the 10 stop ND and without it its 1/125th if you go to 30 seconds your V tone is recorded as VI and at 1 minute its at VII and at 2 minutes VIII and now looks white. unfortunately your highlights were wiped out before you got to this stage.

To put it simply you need to expose for your highlights, which is a pain as often that means under exposing your midtones and boosting the shadows in post processing.

unfortunately with long exposures having a bright sunny day will mean there is a wide dynamic range and secondly the 10 stop filter will not get as slow an exposure as desired. A good natural ND filter such as a cloudy sky will make this so much easier :)

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Oct 10, 2018 22:15:41   #
Bobspez (a regular here)
 
Gary, post an example pic you took and check the "save original" box so we can download the pic and view your settings. If you are doing something wrong that will show what it is.

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Oct 11, 2018 06:00:14   #
wdross (a regular here)
 
GKR wrote:
I'm so sorry that my main email was wrong. I meant to say that I get over exposure shots, not under exposure shots.


I would for one thing open up lense to f11 or f8. This will get you a sharper image due to less diffraction without a lot of sacrifice in DOF. See if your camera will allow an ISO setting of 50 or 25. Then explore the fastest shutter speeds your camera has to offer. It could require an additional ND, but I think you may get away with it with more playing around with your settings.

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Oct 11, 2018 06:08:53   #
Bob309
 
I'm new to photography myself but have done some waterfall shots. You already have the lowest ISO and you are at f22 so you will either have to stack filters to let in less light or go to a faster shutter speed if you are over exposing. The faster shutter speed makes more sense to me. When I did my water fall shots I used a variable ND filter and set my ISO to 100 and a high f-stop as you did and used my variable ND filter then dialed my shutter speed while watching the light meter to get proper exposure. As a newbie I'm open to suggestions.
The attached photo was taken with my Nikon D3300 at 3/5 sec, ISO 100, f32...I'm not sure what the ND filter was set to because I use a variable but I know I never go to the max 10 that it is capable.



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