Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
A couple historic Chicago homes built after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871
Aug 5, 2018 12:01:44   #
mallen1330 Loc: Chicago western suburbs
 
In the Prairie Avenue Historic District, the William W. Kimball house at 1801 S. Prairie Avenue was completed in 1892. Kimball was founder of the piano and organ company that bore his name. Now occupied by the United States Soccer Federation

Across the street, A National Historic Landmark, the Glessner House was designed by noted
American architect Henry Hobson Richardson and completed in 1887.
Kimball house
Kimball house...
(Download)


(Download)


(Download)


(Download)


(Download)
the Glessner House
the Glessner House...
(Download)


(Download)
The "Front door", in a "G" shape for "Glessner"
The "Front door", in a "G" shape for "Glessner"...
(Download)

| Reply
Aug 5, 2018 12:05:40   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
Well, at least they appear to have learned a lesson, a stone is fireproof. Very odd looking lines though, in some of the photos.
--Bob

mallen1330 wrote:
In the Prairie Avenue Historic District, the William W. Kimball house at 1801 S. Prairie Avenue was completed in 1892. Kimball was founder of the piano and organ company that bore his name. Now occupied by the United States Soccer Federation

Across the street, A National Historic Landmark, the Glessner House was designed by noted
American architect Henry Hobson Richardson and completed in 1887.

| Reply
Aug 5, 2018 12:32:58   #
mallen1330 Loc: Chicago western suburbs
 
rmalarz wrote:
Well, at least they appear to have learned a lesson, a stone is fireproof. Very odd looking lines though, in some of the photos.
--Bob

Yes. After the fire, laws were passed requiring new buildings be constructed with fireproof materials such as brick, stone, marble, and limestone (and later, steel and glass). In some areas spared by the fire, some wood frame homes and buildings remain.

By "Very odd looking lines", are you seeing the glare and sunspots in the 3rd & 4th photos? Or..?

| Reply
Aug 5, 2018 12:44:57   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
No, it's the first several that seem to be visually wider at the top than the bottom.
--Bob
mallen1330 wrote:
Yes. After the fire, laws were passed requiring new buildings be constructed with fireproof materials such as brick, stone, marble, and limestone (and later, steel and glass). In some areas spared by the fire, some wood frame homes and buildings remain.

By "Very odd looking lines", are you seeing the glare and sunspots in the 3rd & 4th photos? Or..?

| Reply
Aug 5, 2018 13:45:23   #
mallen1330 Loc: Chicago western suburbs
 
rmalarz wrote:
No, it's the first several that seem to be visually wider at the top than the bottom.
--Bob

Here's the first photo SOOC with no processing. In most architectural photos, I adjust vertical perspective. The result (photo 1 above) closely fits a superimposed grid with vertical lines close to vertical -- in this case, there may be a very slight convergence still --- making it slightly wider at the bottom than the top.
Un-processed for comparison
Un-processed for comparison...
(Download)

| Reply
Aug 5, 2018 13:55:44   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
It's obviously an optical illusion as the edges of the walls are perfectly vertical. Adjusting the vertical perspective is a usual practice when shifts and tilts aren't available. However, without a slight bit of convergence, an optical illusion occurs that makes the tops of the buildings appear to diverge a bit.
--Bob
mallen1330 wrote:
Here's the first photo SOOC with no processing. In most architectural photos, I adjust vertical perspective. The result (photo 1 above) closely fits a superimposed grid with vertical lines close to vertical -- in this case, there may be a very slight convergence still --- making it slightly wider at the bottom than the top.

| Reply
Aug 6, 2018 07:07:22   #
Nosaj Loc: Florida
 
mallen1330 wrote:
In the Prairie Avenue Historic District, the William W. Kimball house at 1801 S. Prairie Avenue was completed in 1892. Kimball was founder of the piano and organ company that bore his name. Now occupied by the United States Soccer Federation

Across the street, A National Historic Landmark, the Glessner House was designed by noted
American architect Henry Hobson Richardson and completed in 1887.


Very nicely done - great color, lighting, resolution, composition, and detail.

| Reply
Aug 6, 2018 07:13:32   #
Heather Iles Loc: UK, Somerset
 
rmalarz wrote:
It's obviously an optical illusion as the edges of the walls are perfectly vertical. Adjusting the vertical perspective is a usual practice when shifts and tilts aren't available. However, without a slight bit of convergence, an optical illusion occurs that makes the tops of the buildings appear to diverge a bit.
--Bob


I spotted it too and I am still puzzled.

| Reply
Aug 6, 2018 08:05:44   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
Interesting photos; nice work on these. If I had to pick a favorite, it would be the last one.

| Reply
Aug 6, 2018 18:16:59   #
rfmaude41 Loc: Lancaster, Texas (DFW area)
 
rmalarz wrote:
No, it's the first several that seem to be visually wider at the top than the bottom.
--Bob


Would have been better if using a "longer" lens, eh ?

| Reply
Nov 14, 2018 18:58:16   #
A10 Loc: Southern Indiana
 
I love looking at the older buildings, beautiful attention to detail.

| Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2020 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.