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Shooting Panos
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Jul 16, 2018 15:53:25   #
Robertven
 
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panoramics and the equipment needed. I'm sure this is a very elementary question but here goes; All of the pano heads that I look at on line appear to center the camera directly over the mounting screw and rotate around that point. I am under the impression that the rotation point should be centered around the lens' nodal point so that parallax is not a factor. Am I wrong about this? How can the nodal point be used as the rotational center if the pano head won't allow that? I guess I'm missing something. Thanks for the help!

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Jul 16, 2018 15:59:24   #
John_F (a regular here)
 
How does one know where the nodal point is?

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Jul 16, 2018 16:01:37   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
Robertven wrote:
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panoramics and the equipment needed. I'm sure this is a very elementary question but here goes; All of the pano heads that I look at on line appear to center the camera directly over the mounting screw and rotate around that point. I am under the impression that the rotation point should be centered around the lens' nodal point so that parallax is not a factor. Am I wrong about this? How can the nodal point be used as the rotational center if the pano head won't allow that? I guess I'm missing something. Thanks for the help!
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panora... (show quote)


You are correct. Pivot on the lens nodal point.

A few years ago I bought a Panosaurus for that reason, but they appear to no longer be available.

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Jul 16, 2018 16:03:04   #
DanielB
 
The pano head should be centered just forward on the camera's sensor at the lenses nodal point so the sensor rotates on the nodal points axis/center point. If you shoot off the lens mount then the body of the camera, and the sensor swing in an arch around the pivot point which gives an undesirable result when you stitch the photo's. Determining nodal points differs depending on the lens. YouTube has some good vids on this subject. Also, most panoramas should be shot orientated in portrait not landscape for better results.
Robertven wrote:
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panoramics and the equipment needed. I'm sure this is a very elementary question but here goes; All of the pano heads that I look at on line appear to center the camera directly over the mounting screw and rotate around that point. I am under the impression that the rotation point should be centered around the lens' nodal point so that parallax is not a factor. Am I wrong about this? How can the nodal point be used as the rotational center if the pano head won't allow that? I guess I'm missing something. Thanks for the help!
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panora... (show quote)

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Jul 16, 2018 16:06:21   #
rjaywallace (a regular here)
 
I apologize that this is not a direct answer to your question, Robert. But I would suggest you call Customer Service at Really Right Stuff and pose your question to some of the experts there. I sincerely believe they can help you and along the way will introduce you to some of RRS’s high quality gear. Panos are one of their specialities.

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Jul 16, 2018 16:08:32   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
John_F wrote:
How does one know where the nodal point is?


With the Panosaurus you experiment.
Basically pick a distance on the adapter, set camera, put something vertical on the left in the viewfinder, then pan so it's on the other side.
Move camera closer/farther, repeat. When you find the nodal point (vertical object will look correct at both the left and right of the viewfinder), write it down for that lens (Possibly focal length also if it is a zoom). This needs to be done with each lens (focal length).

Instructions came with the Panosaurus.

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Jul 16, 2018 16:11:24   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
Daniel, you'll find that the correct method is to rotate the camera around the nodal point of the lens, not the sensor.
--Bob
DanielB wrote:
The pano head should be centered on the camera's sensor so the sensor rotates on it's axis/center point. If you shoot off the lens mount then the body of the camera, and the sensor swing in an arch around the pivot point which gives an undesirable result when you stitch the photo's. Also, most panoramas should be shot orientated in portrait not landscape for better results.

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Jul 16, 2018 16:18:31   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
Robertven wrote:
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panoramics and the equipment needed. I'm sure this is a very elementary question but here goes; All of the pano heads that I look at on line appear to center the camera directly over the mounting screw and rotate around that point. I am under the impression that the rotation point should be centered around the lens' nodal point so that parallax is not a factor. Am I wrong about this? How can the nodal point be used as the rotational center if the pano head won't allow that? I guess I'm missing something. Thanks for the help!
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panora... (show quote)


In the basics you are correct But, for more than 90% of pano work, particularly landscape photography the nodal point is not a concern at all, unless there are objects close to the camera which you would like included in the photograph.
There is a panorama section here on UHH which has many posted images of which I'm sure almost all of them were taken without any consideration at all of the 'nodal point'
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/s-128-1.html

Here is a good reference site; pour yourself a libation,sit back and enjoy.
https://photographylife.com/landscapes/panorama-photography-tips

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Jul 16, 2018 16:21:22   #
GoofyNewfie (a regular here)
 
I've shot literally hundreds of panos hand-held.
If you have nothing in the foreground close to the camera, don't use a super-wide focal length and try to pivot at the camera, you should be successful if you use Photoshop to make it.
For VR Panoramas, however or images with objects close to the camera, it's critical to find and use the nodal point and an apparatus like the Panosarus.

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Jul 16, 2018 16:26:26   #
hassighedgehog (a regular here)
 
Either point would work, but it is easier to find the sensor as it is usually labeled on the bottom of the camera and does not change with lens length. Don't see how parallax would be an issue with through the lens viewing. A Panorama is basically a curve flattened.

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Jul 16, 2018 16:28:50   #
DirtFarmer (a regular here)
 
The nodal point is the correct point to rotate around but it's really only important if you have close foreground objects. I have shot a lot of panos hand held. I don't have a pano head and most of the time I don't use a tripod. If you can just stand fairly steadily and rotate your body around the lens it will work most of the time. Since digital pictures are basically free, take the set of photos for the pano 3 or 4 times and chances are very good that at least one of them will work.

For landscapes at a distance, I just rotate my whole body around my feet and it works fine.

I should note that I have done panos of dynamic scenes such as a group of people on stage indoors. Again, I try it several times. Occasionally someone moves and causes a ghost. I have sometimes been able to make the pano in Photoshop and then edit the masks to mitigate the motion. Doesn't always work but it's a fun exercise.

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Jul 16, 2018 16:32:17   #
GoofyNewfie (a regular here)
 
DirtFarmer wrote:
The nodal point is the correct point to rotate around but it's really only important if you have close foreground objects. I have shot a lot of panos hand held. I don't have a pano head and most of the time I don't use a tripod. If you can just stand fairly steadily and rotate your body around the lens it will work most of the time. Since digital pictures are basically free, take the set of photos for the pano 3 or 4 times and chances are very good that at least one of them will work.

For landscapes at a distance, I just rotate my whole body around my feet and it works fine.

I should note that I have done panos of dynamic scenes such as a group of people on stage indoors. Again, I try it several times. Occasionally someone moves and causes a ghost. I have sometimes been able to make the pano in Photoshop and then edit the masks to mitigate the motion. Doesn't always work but it's a fun exercise.
The nodal point is the correct point to rotate aro... (show quote)




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Jul 16, 2018 16:37:43   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
DirtFarmer wrote:
The nodal point is the correct point to rotate around but it's really only important if you have close foreground objects. I have shot a lot of panos hand held. I don't have a pano head and most of the time I don't use a tripod. If you can just stand fairly steadily and rotate your body around the lens it will work most of the time. Since digital pictures are basically free, take the set of photos for the pano 3 or 4 times and chances are very good that at least one of them will work.

For landscapes at a distance, I just rotate my whole body around my feet and it works fine.

I should note that I have done panos of dynamic scenes such as a group of people on stage indoors. Again, I try it several times. Occasionally someone moves and causes a ghost. I have sometimes been able to make the pano in Photoshop and then edit the masks to mitigate the motion. Doesn't always work but it's a fun exercise.
The nodal point is the correct point to rotate aro... (show quote)


Yes, the closer to the camera objects are located, the bigger the problem with parallax with those objects. For distant panoramas there is usually little or no problem.

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Jul 16, 2018 17:24:26   #
speters (a regular here)
 
Robertven wrote:
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panoramics and the equipment needed. I'm sure this is a very elementary question but here goes; All of the pano heads that I look at on line appear to center the camera directly over the mounting screw and rotate around that point. I am under the impression that the rotation point should be centered around the lens' nodal point so that parallax is not a factor. Am I wrong about this? How can the nodal point be used as the rotational center if the pano head won't allow that? I guess I'm missing something. Thanks for the help!
I'm trying to educate myself about shooting panora... (show quote)

No, the nodal point is not in front of the lens, but its the sensor/film plane above the tripod socket!

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Jul 16, 2018 17:30:54   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
speters wrote:
No, the nodal point is not in front of the lens, but its the sensor/film plane above the tripod socket!


The nodal point varies from lens to lens but it almost always lies between the front and rear element of the lens. The sensor, or in days of old the film plane, is not the nodal point.
http://www.johnhpanos.com/epcalib.htm

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