Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Home | Photography Digest | Active Topics | Newest Pictures | Search | Login | Register | Help
Main Photography Discussion
So how would you handle this......
If you would like to post a reply, then please login (if you already have an account) or register (if you don't).
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 next>>
Jul 10, 2018 19:29:15   #
bgrn
 
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
 
Jul 10, 2018 19:39:46   #
orrie smith
 
bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)


Lead, follow, or get out of the way. A saying my Dad taught me when I was young. What it means to me in your situation is that when you are with a group, you are following. As a result, you need to keep pace and not slow the group down. If you want to lead, hike with a group that has your interests in their hearts, otherwise, go alone or with family. As for New York and the fast paced environment, all I can say is good luck. Sometimes you have to concede to your surroundings.
Jul 10, 2018 19:50:07   #
Gene51 (a regular here)
 
bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)


Oh, puleze! You do exaggerate - the pace here is only 150 mph. Shooting your camera completely redefines the notion of "Grab Shot", doesn't it?

Out in the woods I hike alone when I have my camera - there is only one other person who I like to hike with who is also a photographer - she and I will go off in totally different directions and return at a given time to a GPS coordinate - otherwise we'd get in each others way. We've tried walkie-talkies, but we are often out of range. If I am in a group, I tell them to go ahead and I'll either catch up with them later, or meet them at the parking lot.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gene_lugo/
Jul 10, 2018 19:51:16   #
lamiaceae (a regular here)
 
bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast pasted environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when I finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)


Hike with other photographers (photographer friends). Or you need different understanding relatives. I have a different but yet similar problem. I'll go on "photo trips" with fellow photographer friends and my wife comes along usually just to see the sights, but I have mobility problems and find it hard to walk more than say 100' with out stopping and resting. I have arthritis in many joints. I tend to get left behind by a friend or the group. I also feel that since some of them are really serious photographers I'm holding them back and so they don't ask me to join them or take me up on my offers as often as they used to. So a lot of the time now, it is just my wife and I. Standing and shooting is hard now too. Last seasons 2016-2017 we went out a lot taking photos, my wife too (I prodded her to use one of my cameras). But since Fall 2017 when I got injured at a park doing photography on my own. I tripped and fell. Saved the two cameras around my neck but fell on to not grass, not cement, not dirt, but gravel! Cut up my legs pretty badly. I have not want to go outside for photography, but once since.
Jul 10, 2018 20:03:20   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
If you are not walking in The City you are not really seeing The City. I never realized it was fast paced until I moved to Delaware at age 55.

Wherever you are, if you want to take pictures you need some time away from the non-photographers. Otherwise, carry a point and shoot and do the best you can while still be sociable.

--
Jul 10, 2018 20:03:55   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
bgrn wrote:
Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is i... (show quote)


Constant dilemma. My solution is to hike with Photographers, who understand the need to capture images vs miles.

And, as far as New York or Street Photography in general, the solution is to get out of the car and walk. Besides, nobody drives in Manhattan.
 
Jul 10, 2018 20:49:06   #
RichardTaylor (a regular here)
 
bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)


Cities are for walking, with camera in hand, ready to go. Just raise it to your eye and shoot.

When hiking in national parks etc - try to do it with like minded people.
Jul 10, 2018 20:55:20   #
jcboy3 (a regular here)
 
bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)


By letting you go at your own pace and meeting you somewhere later.
Jul 10, 2018 21:09:31   #
10MPlayer
 
When I go on a vacation with the family I go realizing it's not a photo shoot. It's a family vacation. If I want to go on a photo shoot I go alone. That's why I don't go on many photo shoots. It's a lonely pursuit. I'd rather enjoy the family time. But that's just me.
Jul 10, 2018 21:30:32   #
Charles 46277
 
Well, that is why I never took any guided tours. My first trip to Chicago was a few years ago, and I went alone mostly to take pictures (and explore the great restaurants that I could afford, and theater, and concerts). I hired a college photography major there in advance (emailed the head of photography at a nearby art college), to show me around and help with equipment (and for a bit of security as well), for 4 hours each day. He was knowledgeable, smart, a good guide, and interesting company. He smuggled me into a vacant banquet room in a tall building to shoot the snow falling on all the buildings and the little Chicago River below, using a 4x5 field camera on tripod..

It is fine to travel with friends, lovers, or family, but for that the purpose has to be the enjoyment of each other--not our individual interests. We don't take someone to dinner and stay on the phone with the stock broker or business contacts.

bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)
Jul 10, 2018 21:51:55   #
AndyH (a regular here)
 
I am very lucky indeed to have a wife who shares my passion, and has a similar vision of what constitutes an interesting shot.

Andy
 
Jul 11, 2018 00:36:26   #
JD750 (a regular here)
 
bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)


I have two answers:

(1) fast lens, crank the ISO, and fast shutter speed. Run and gun. And consider that motion blur can be a creative tool.

(2) My hiking buddies don’t wait for me. It is up to me to catch back up to them after I stop and work a shot. It is hard work but ultimately I end up in even better shape than them. So it ultimately works to my advantage. Sometimes I blow past them and keep going then stop a mile ahead and let them walk by while I am shooting. It is one of the many ‘perks” of the job of being the “designated photographer” or simply a photographer. Nobody said it was going to be easy. Another perk is spending 2 hrs each night editing and posting the daily log while hiking buddies imbibe and relax. And that final perk is... you get better at it with practice.
Jul 11, 2018 02:32:30   #
BHC
 
As far as hiking is concerned, there is a simple answer to having the group wait for you. Before everyone gets up in the morning, raid their packs and take out all their individual packs of toilet paper. Then have a significant supply in your pack. As soon as each hiker realizes that he/she "forgot" this important hiking staple and you brought "too much", they won't let you out of their sight!
Jul 11, 2018 05:24:41   #
lamiaceae (a regular here)
 
rgrenaderphoto wrote:
Constant dilemma. My solution is to hike with Photographers, who understand the need to capture images vs miles.

And, as far as New York or Street Photography in general, the solution is to get out of the car and walk. Besides, nobody drives in Manhattan.


Yes, that is what I said before, hike with other Photographers. Though I was not thinking specifically of city walking, I'm more likely to have done it in the country-side or wilderness. I think one of the only photo walks I've done in a large urban area was Olivera Street to Disney Hall in Los Angeles. Like the Eighties song by the band Missing Persons "Nobody Walks in L.A."!
Jul 11, 2018 05:40:44   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
bgrn wrote:
For starters this last few weeks have been great, a week in upstate New York visiting the city with my son and his family, a week of work, then last week camping at Crater Lake Oregon with several of our friends.

So here is my dilemma, how would you handle these.

First in New York, the city pace is about 200 mph, driving with my son is like a really good ride at an amusement park, not the best situation to take pictures. There were several times when a perfect shot presented itself, like a great sunset through the towering city for example. It's not like Utah, you can't just stop on the side of the road, set up and take the shot. Although I was able to get some nice shots in the museums and in central park. How do you handle really fast paste environments?

Next, at Crater Lake, I was the only one that is into any type of photography. When I would see something while hiking on a trail for example, I would stop and try to take the time to set up and take pictures from different angles and vantage points. I felt like the group we were hiking with wanted to go at a faster pace than I was allowing, even though most of the time they would just keep on going and I would catch up when i finished. But sometimes they would have to wait for me so that we all made sure we took the same and or correct trail spur. So how would you handle being in a group and being the only one who stops to take these pictures? (however my wife has learned that when she stops with me she actually finds more things to look at that she would have otherwise missed, she likes stopping with me now and is not so worried about the end but is starting to enjoy the trip)
For starters this last few weeks have been great, ... (show quote)


In NYC I walk, take my time. Take subway as needed.
Stay off freeways and take secondary roads, but yes there are places where there is no place to pull off and that is just too bad. I have stopped as close as possible and again walked to what I saw.
I never walk or hike with a group for the reason you state. If they are not interested in photo taking they will generally despise you. Either leave your camera and take cell phone shots on the run or ditch the group and enjoy a slower pace and see about 100% more than the fast pace clowns missing wildlife and details. So many people have "Been Somewhere" but never experienced it. This is true of package tours anywhere even photo ones with a schedule you never see the real environment in am cattle group or cruising in a bus. This same mentality applies to hikers who want to say "Been there done that" but have no clue where they were or what was really there.
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 next>>
Main Photography Discussion
Home | Latest Digest | Back to Top | All Sections
Contact us | Privacy policy | Terms of use
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2018 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.