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Red colors off Nikon 7200
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May 27, 2018 11:24:55   #
SBrodsky
 
Has anyone else had problems with red colors while shooting Nikon? I have a 7200, and invariably, the reds are always off a bit, as shown by the same photo, before and after Lightroom color processing. I notice this a lot when I've shot teams with red or red trim in their uniforms, as it always comes out a tad orange. I use the Color/Hue adjustment in Lightroom to true up to that which I saw w/my naked eye. It happens indoors under good lighting conditions as well. I just think there's something in the software of this particular Nikon, which doesn't seem to register this true color. Any and all thoughts are welcome. For the record Nikon 7200, Nikkor 70-200 2.8 Lens, B & W XPro UV Haze Filter. Auto1 White Balance, F4 @1/3200, 200mm, 500 ISO (Auto). JPEG Large/Fine. Cropped the photo to highlight and zoom in on the action. I did have to bring my exposure down a smidge in Lightroom. Was an early AM game Monday, May 2, 2018 @ Metro State University of Denver. Heritage HS (blue) vs Mountain Range HS. Field is entirely artificial.





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May 27, 2018 12:21:59   #
MT Shooter (a regular here)
 
SBrodsky wrote:
Has anyone else had problems with red colors while shooting Nikon? I have a 7200, and invariably, the reds are always off a bit, as shown by the same photo, before and after Lightroom color processing. I notice this a lot when I've shot teams with red or red trim in their uniforms, as it always comes out a tad orange. I use the Color/Hue adjustment in Lightroom to true up to that which I saw w/my naked eye. It happens indoors under good lighting conditions as well. I just think there's something in the software of this particular Nikon, which doesn't seem to register this true color. Any and all thoughts are welcome. For the record Nikon 7200, Nikkor 70-200 2.8 Lens, B & W XPro UV Haze Filter. Auto1 White Balance, F4 @1/3200, 200mm, 500 ISO (Auto). JPEG Large/Fine. Cropped the photo to highlight and zoom in on the action. I did have to bring my exposure down a smidge in Lightroom. Was an early AM game Monday, May 2, 2018 @ Metro State University of Denver. Heritage HS (blue) vs Mountain Range HS. Field is entirely artificial.
Has anyone else had problems with red colors while... (show quote)


You can easily adjust your hues in the camera to come up with the result that pleases you.

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May 27, 2018 13:49:21   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
I would calibrate your monitor with a hardwire device to the correct color palate before you change camera settings.

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May 27, 2018 19:53:34   #
aflundi
 
SBrodsky wrote:
... I have a 7200, and invariably, the reds are always off a bit, as shown by the same photo, before and after Lightroom color processing. I notice this a lot when I've shot teams with red or red trim in their uniforms, as it always comes out a tad orange. I use the Color/Hue adjustment in Lightroom to true up to that which I saw w/my naked eye. It happens indoors under good lighting conditions as well. ...

It's just a guess, but is it possible the red channel is being saturated in the RAW file? Do you have a .NEF you can post?

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May 27, 2018 20:37:30   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
What are your picture control settings?

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May 28, 2018 07:51:18   #
camerapapi (a regular here)
 
Some early Nikon digital bodies had issues with the red channel but I have not heard anything about the new models.
Review your Picture Control settings although it could also be a good idea to give Nikon a call and send them some samples.

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May 28, 2018 12:03:57   #
artBob (a regular here)
 
To my eyes, the adjustment is over-saturating the reds. Look at the dark red in center background, for example. Unless that shirt and socks are brand new, they are not that red in real life.
I am looking at the examples on a 2015 MacBook Pro, 15 in., calibrated.

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May 28, 2018 13:45:05   #
cambriaman (a regular here)
 
Red is, historically, the most difficult color for any process to reproduce adequately. It was that way on film and the problem did not go away with digital. The great thing about digital is you can shoot RAW and then individually adjust color spectra to get the exact image you visualized. Go for it! Make sure your monitor is calibrated!

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May 28, 2018 19:10:18   #
hassighedgehog (a regular here)
 
Color in all hues is a very subjective matter. Almost no one sees it the same way. About the only precise color management would be to measure the temperature of each color in an image and use that as the standard. This is the reason some criticize images on this site as too "cooked". This is especially evident in images in the southwest. Combine this with the color bias of any equipment and you have a different opinion for each person viewing an image.

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May 28, 2018 19:24:53   #
artBob (a regular here)
 
hassighedgehog wrote:
Color in all hues is a very subjective matter. Almost no one sees it the same way. About the only precise color management would be to measure the temperature of each color in an image and use that as the standard. This is the reason some criticize images on this site as too "cooked". This is especially evident in images in the southwest. Combine this with the color bias of any equipment and you have a different opinion for each person viewing an image.


Yet, there are general areas of correctness. Our eyes (well, mind) compensates for problems, up to a point. But there are points, else there would be no art directors in corporations. I still think the corrected red is beyond the pale (excuse the pun), and wonder if other color pros feel the same--just to help the OP.

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May 28, 2018 21:16:31   #
williejoha
 
I would calibrate my display using a Spyder or equivalent. Next I would take some shots that include a color passport. Then when you use your PP, you can verify your colors in an educated manner. Just my two cents.
WJH

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Jun 19, 2018 00:57:08   #
Pixeldawg
 
If you REALLY want accurate color, you need to do two things. First, get a "puck" and calibrate your monitor with a MacBeth color card. Then, buy an Expodisc and use it to make a custom white balance prior to shooting. If you change light, do another custom white balance, and if the light changes again, do another. In looking at your images, it seems to me that the whites are blown out, so I also suspect it is your post processing as well. The images have a general washed out appearance, so I am guessing that the whites need to be toned down a bit, and in turn that will adjust your red, which looks like it is washed out as well. Make sure you are shooting in RAW mode, too. Hope this helps.

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Jun 25, 2018 00:07:21   #
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Jun 26, 2018 12:19:09   #
gvarner (a regular here)
 
I've read that Nikons have trouble rendering reds. Don't know what the fix is.

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Jun 26, 2018 15:23:51   #
hassighedgehog (a regular here)
 
There has always been a difference between how various systems render reds. In film, Kodak film always had richer reds than Fujifilm or other common 35 mm film. Today, Canon printers have richer reds than Epson. Not surprised that cameras have similar differences.

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