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Shutter Count on Nikon Refurbished Cameras
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May 10, 2018 18:57:57   #
lamontcranston
 
I have always thought Refurbished meant a camera that was returned to the manufacturer for a problem, was repaired, tested, and as a result it now passed all specs for a new camera and was being re-sold as Refurbished. I asked a Chat Agent if he could give me the shutter count of a refurbished Nikon D5500 they had for sale. Here's how the conversation went:

Boyd H: Refurbished items are products that for many reasons did not meet early quality controls at the factory so were not shipped initially. After testing, a manufacturer may determine a product meets all the specifications but does not want it sold as new. A “Refurb” is such an item; which has never been sold, meets the advertised specifications and includes a warranty which may be shorter than the original one offered for a “new” item.
Boyd H: So, there is no shutter count for this.
Me: Even some d5500's on Ebay publish shutter counts. Are you saying the shutter count on this camera is "0"?
Boyd H: It's never been sold. Someone may have tested the shutter a few times, but that's it.
Me: OK, thank you for your time. I appreciate it."

That is news to me. So refurbished means the shutter count will be close to "0"? I've only bought one refurb, a Sony, and it had a shutter count of 266. I was happy with that. I don't think I would be happy with a shutter count of 10,000 on a refurb. His comments that a refurb has never been sold and the shutter count will be close to "0" does not sound entirely correct to me. Comments?

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May 10, 2018 19:06:33   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
To my knowledge, Nikon does not reset the shutter count on refurbed cameras, and for obvious reasons. Think about it. Let's say a camera had 10000 actuations. They reset the count to 0. The buyer feels pretty good about this camera with 0 exposures. However, in reality the shutter is 10000 actuations old. A refurbed camera has been thoroughly tested and performs to or above factory standards. The shutter, unless it's replaced, maintains the same count it had when refurbed.
--Bob

lamontcranston wrote:
I have always thought Refurbished meant a camera that was returned to the manufacturer for a problem, was repaired, tested, and as a result it now passed all specs for a new camera and was being re-sold as Refurbished. I asked a Chat Agent if he could give me the shutter count of a refurbished Nikon D5500 they had for sale. Here's how the conversation went:

Boyd H: Refurbished items are products that for many reasons did not meet early quality controls at the factory so were not shipped initially. After testing, a manufacturer may determine a product meets all the specifications but does not want it sold as new. A “Refurb” is such an item; which has never been sold, meets the advertised specifications and includes a warranty which may be shorter than the original one offered for a “new” item.
Boyd H: So, there is no shutter count for this.
Me: Even some d5500's on Ebay publish shutter counts. Are you saying the shutter count on this camera is "0"?
Boyd H: It's never been sold. Someone may have tested the shutter a few times, but that's it.
Me: OK, thank you for your time. I appreciate it."

That is news to me. So refurbished means the shutter count will be close to "0"? I've only bought one refurb, a Sony, and it had a shutter count of 266. I was happy with that. I don't think I would be happy with a shutter count of 10,000 on a refurb. His comments that a refurb has never been sold and the shutter count will be close to "0" does not sound entirely correct to me. Comments?
I have always thought Refurbished meant a camera t... (show quote)

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May 10, 2018 19:13:13   #
Ctrclckws
 
I've seen shutter count reports in various threads. Some were pretty low, less than 100. Others were in the thousands. My own d7200 refurb had about a 5000 count.

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May 10, 2018 20:08:56   #
bdk
 
my Nikon had a very low number, dont remember but I think It was less than 100.

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May 10, 2018 20:38:49   #
lamontcranston
 
I forgot to mention that the above conversation was with a Chat Agent at B&H Photo.

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May 11, 2018 06:17:43   #
camerapapi (a regular here)
 
Boyd H is totally wrong and that should be brought to B&H attention. Refurbs are usually cameras used as a demo, returned to the dealer by the buyer or open boxes. It is obvious they cannot be sold as new so they go through a testing bench to make sure the camera works to specs and then it is returned in a different box that clearly says "refub item." They usually carry a 90 days warranty but dealers like Cameta extend it to one year.
Nothing wrong with a refurb and usually they have low milage. They save us a lot of money and to me they are like new.

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May 11, 2018 07:00:04   #
dcampbell52
 
rmalarz wrote:
To my knowledge, Nikon does not reset the shutter count on refurbed cameras, and for obvious reasons. Think about it. Let's say a camera had 10000 actuations. They reset the count to 0. The buyer feels pretty good about this camera with 0 exposures. However, in reality the shutter is 10000 actuations old. A refurbed camera has been thoroughly tested and performs to or above factory standards. The shutter, unless it's replaced, maintains the same count it had when refurbed.
--Bob


You are correct. The ONLY time that a shutter count gets reset on a Nikon is if the shutter assembly is replaced with a new one. As for refurbs, Nikon refurbishes for many reasons. A "Nikon" refurb may be a camera that did not meet specifications at inspection prior to shipping or it may be a camera that had issues and was replaced with a "new" camera. The refurb may have had the shutter replace, electronics replace.. or any number of things that fell short. Nikon used my Nikon D7100 as a test bed after I had been using it for a year. (NOTE: I retired from Nikon USA in Melville before moving to Florida) and they went through it completely replacing any items that showed wear. NOTE: this was during the D600 fiasco and Nikon was diligently trying to determine where their issues were. I ended up with, in essence, a new camera (the body and serial number was about the only thing not changed) and an additional 6 month warranty. They had the camera for 4 weeks... actually it was overnighted to them and they overnighted it back but was out of my hands for 4 weeks. I had an older D70s to use for that period. My point is that if Nikon does the refurb, I have no qualms about it... if the refurb was done by some non-Nikon shop, I wouldn't trust it. Just my opinion.

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May 11, 2018 08:11:26   #
47greyfox (a regular here)
 
IMO, most of the chat agents are pure sales people and self anointed experts. Yours might also be a BS artist in training. All the more reason to trust factory refurbs and no others. Only then can a buyer be sure of what he/she is buying.

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May 11, 2018 08:19:34   #
Screamin Scott (a regular here)
 
My D610 refurb from Cameta had a count of 12...

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May 11, 2018 08:51:26   #
lamontcranston
 
Thanks to all who responded. When I asked the Chat guy if he could give me the shutter count of the camera, there was a slight pause and then the definition of "refurbished" popped up immediately, like it was a pre-written response to be sent to anyone asking about refurbished equipment. I suspect it was part of a "script" to be given to anyone asking a related question on "refurbished". Then he immediately wrote another comment that popped up:

"Boyd H: So, there is no shutter count for this."

I'm sure the guy was just doing his job as he was trained. I was just surprised that he implied that refurbs will have a shutter count close to "0". That is not true in my experience. And his statement that "It's never been sold. Someone may have tested the shutter a few times, but that's it." also rang untrue. I mean no criticism of B&H. I've dealt with them for years and have been extremely satisfied with their honesty, service, and products. I have no hesitation is buying refurbished equipment from them. I just thought my Chat experience was interesting and worth commenting on.

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May 11, 2018 08:52:41   #
olemikey (a regular here)
 
I have bought several refurbs in the last few years (Nikons)....several were from the demise of the Ritz / Wolf camera chain, etc. (according to seller - typically B&H, Cameta, KEH, Roberts, Jet, Buydig, etc.)....one had one shutter actuation, the other two had less than 20 if memory serves me. Yes they were pristine, in the "white" box with refurb papers and warranty and usual stuff. Bought a Sony A58 from a pawn shop $110 (shop claimed it had issues, all the photos had "greentint" - probably old fluorescent lights-my guess)...it also looked brand new, spotless...and had 214 actuations, and no green tint....and all have served me very well....no issues, no failures, work just like any other new camera I've bought over the last 50 yrs. Have a little collection of Fuji Bridge cams bought the same way....never an issue. Same with lens collection. Yes, buyer beware, be aware of return policy and warranty, look at seller ratings, etc. Buying refurbs direct from Canon/Nikon/others is probably better. Have had issues with new electronic items bought from big box and mom&pops, so you never know who might fail you.

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May 11, 2018 09:26:36   #
mas24
 
lamontcranston wrote:
I have always thought Refurbished meant a camera that was returned to the manufacturer for a problem, was repaired, tested, and as a result it now passed all specs for a new camera and was being re-sold as Refurbished. I asked a Chat Agent if he could give me the shutter count of a refurbished Nikon D5500 they had for sale. Here's how the conversation went:

Boyd H: Refurbished items are products that for many reasons did not meet early quality controls at the factory so were not shipped initially. After testing, a manufacturer may determine a product meets all the specifications but does not want it sold as new. A “Refurb” is such an item; which has never been sold, meets the advertised specifications and includes a warranty which may be shorter than the original one offered for a “new” item.
Boyd H: So, there is no shutter count for this.
Me: Even some d5500's on Ebay publish shutter counts. Are you saying the shutter count on this camera is "0"?
Boyd H: It's never been sold. Someone may have tested the shutter a few times, but that's it.
Me: OK, thank you for your time. I appreciate it."

That is news to me. So refurbished means the shutter count will be close to "0"? I've only bought one refurb, a Sony, and it had a shutter count of 266. I was happy with that. I don't think I would be happy with a shutter count of 10,000 on a refurb. His comments that a refurb has never been sold and the shutter count will be close to "0" does not sound entirely correct to me. Comments?
I have always thought Refurbished meant a camera t... (show quote)


Nikon does not roll back the shutter count, even if the shutter is replaced. If your shutter fails on you, and it is replaced with a brand new one. It will not come back to you with a zero count. I know someone who had his D750 recalled for a shutter issue. Shutter was replaced, and no shutter rollback count was done.

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May 11, 2018 09:48:25   #
dcampbell52
 
mas24 wrote:
Nikon does not roll back the shutter count, even if the shutter is replaced. If your shutter fails on you, and it is replaced with a brand new one. It will not come back to you with a zero count. I know someone who had his D750 recalled for a shutter issue. Shutter was replaced, and no shutter rollback count was done.


True... the shutter count is similar to the odometer on a car. It not only reflects wear and tear on the shutter but everything mechanical and electronic in the camera. My case was somewhat specific because I worked in NPS for Nikon and they basically completely rebuilt the camera.. this was about the time of the D600 fiasco. However, times change and they are very specific about when they do a reset or replacement of the electronics that does the shutter count.

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May 11, 2018 10:00:56   #
FreddB
 
lamontcranston wrote:
Thanks to all who responded. When I asked the Chat guy if he could give me the shutter count of the camera, there was a slight pause and then the definition of "refurbished" popped up immediately, like it was a pre-written response to be sent to anyone asking about refurbished equipment. I suspect it was part of a "script" to be given to anyone asking a related question on "refurbished". Then he immediately wrote another comment that popped up:

"Boyd H: So, there is no shutter count for this."

I'm sure the guy was just doing his job as he was trained. I was just surprised that he implied that refurbs will have a shutter count close to "0". That is not true in my experience. And his statement that "It's never been sold. Someone may have tested the shutter a few times, but that's it." also rang untrue. I mean no criticism of B&H. I've dealt with them for years and have been extremely satisfied with their honesty, service, and products. I have no hesitation is buying refurbished equipment from them. I just thought my Chat experience was interesting and worth commenting on.
Thanks to all who responded. When I asked the Cha... (show quote)


Just my 2cents, but...
I think you could go to next pay grade at B&H, in a non-confrontational way, and ask for clarification of what you were told by Boyd. "I'm still/more confused, can I get a clearer explanation?" Just to see if you get the real skinny or more BS piled on.

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May 11, 2018 10:33:13   #
jeep_daddy (a regular here)
 
lamontcranston wrote:
I have always thought Refurbished meant a camera that was returned to the manufacturer for a problem, was repaired, tested, and as a result it now passed all specs for a new camera and was being re-sold as Refurbished. I asked a Chat Agent if he could give me the shutter count of a refurbished Nikon D5500 they had for sale. Here's how the conversation went:

Boyd H: Refurbished items are products that for many reasons did not meet early quality controls at the factory so were not shipped initially. After testing, a manufacturer may determine a product meets all the specifications but does not want it sold as new. A “Refurb” is such an item; which has never been sold, meets the advertised specifications and includes a warranty which may be shorter than the original one offered for a “new” item.
Boyd H: So, there is no shutter count for this.
Me: Even some d5500's on Ebay publish shutter counts. Are you saying the shutter count on this camera is "0"?
Boyd H: It's never been sold. Someone may have tested the shutter a few times, but that's it.
Me: OK, thank you for your time. I appreciate it."

That is news to me. So refurbished means the shutter count will be close to "0"? I've only bought one refurb, a Sony, and it had a shutter count of 266. I was happy with that. I don't think I would be happy with a shutter count of 10,000 on a refurb. His comments that a refurb has never been sold and the shutter count will be close to "0" does not sound entirely correct to me. Comments?
I have always thought Refurbished meant a camera t... (show quote)


No, this doesn't sound correct to me at all. You have to ask yourself "where do all the cameras go that were bought and returned because the customer simply wasn't satisfied?"

Almost every store these days has a 15-30 day return policy. So if you buy a camera at Best Buy, and 20 days later you decide that it's too heavy for you, you don't like the feel or perhaps you can't understand the menu system, or maybe you are just the kind of person that doesn't read the manuals, leaves it in all it's default settings, i.e. full auto, and don't like it's photos and then you return it for something different or to get your money back. Where does that camera go? Well, I have worked retail before and I can tell you exactly where it goes. It goes back to the place that the store got it from. Sometimes, depending on the volume of sales the store has, it comes directly from the manufacture, but sometimes it may come from a middle man or distribution center (wholesaler). They don't simply put the camera in the trash or put it in the crusher. No No No. They get fixed, tested, repackaged in a plain box, and sold as refurbished.

But exactly how many shutter actuations do you think someone would or could put on a shutter in 20 days? I'd say less that a 1000 in most cases. Yes, it could be more. But most cameras have at least a 100,000 expected or more, shutter actuation life. I don't know if they reset the shutter count or not. I expect some do and some don't. I have a friend that owned a Canon 7D that has a shutter rated for 100,000 shutter actuation min life, and it lasted 300,000 before it gave out.

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