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Help! Shooting my hockey player on the ice
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Apr 9, 2018 22:07:56   #
mvovr
 
Hi! This is Debbie! I've fiddled with a DSL since my kids were little, & what came out was fine. Ive upgraded to a Nikon D 5300 & took a class, wanting to get serious & get better pics that dont need so much post editing. I'm doing okay, until it comes time to hit the ice rink! Between the sheet of ice, bright fluorescent light, & fast movement, I'm a mess! I like to use my 70-300 lens to get close-ups, but it won't always auto focus for me. Shooting in shutter priority helps a bit, but my shots come out dark with the ice looking gray. What the heck?!
So this shot had some editing...I'd like to get this with my settings. Thanks!



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Apr 9, 2018 22:18:47   #
Dan Downie
 
Adjust your white balance to capture the ice white (fluorescent, or other... I prefer setting by temperature using the Kelvin setting). And try using Auto ISO along with exposure compensation to capture shots under varying conditions from one end of the rink to the other. I hope this helps. Good luck!

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Apr 9, 2018 22:42:35   #
Fotoartist (a regular here)
 
What you are doing is not something that can be done well very easily. Shooting Hockey is one of the hardest sports to shoot because of the combination of the speed of the sport, and low light in the arenas. The best shots I've seen are by the pros who use the arena's flash banks triggered by a "pocket wizard". The flashes are setup around the nets. They go off and on throughout the whole game and nobody ever notices them (except the photograpers). They stop the action at over 1/1000 sec.

But barring that, and just using the ambient light of the arena, I would use Auto WB and Auto ISO. Shoot manual exposure and keep the shutter speed around 1/500 sec. or your sharpness will be affected. You are in control of SS in Auto ISO. You are also in control of the F stop which I would keep nearly wide open. The camera selects the ISO. I would definitely shoot in Raw. Auto White Balance in all cameras does a good job and can be adjusted in post.

Look at your first few shots and check the histogram. If you think they look a little dark use your (+–) button on your camera to lighten it 1/2 stop or so. You don't have to overcompensate too much in-camera as it will probably lighten up nicely in the raw converter.

My first choice for noise reduction (you will be shooting around 3200 ISO) would be NIK DFine 2, (it's free, and it does a nice job). Good luck.

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Apr 9, 2018 22:50:18   #
Joe Blow
 
Shoot in RAW. Then use the WB (White Balance) in your photo editor to correct the color.

One problem is our eyes fool us. While we think of ice and snow as being white, it isn't. It's clear. What we actually see is the light being reflected. BUT, our brains automatically adjust the color so we think we are seeing something that is tainted by the surroundings. A camera doesn't do that like our eye / brain do. Adjusting the color in PP to approach what we think the color should be is the work around.

Adjusting your camera WB is an approximation. Fluorescent lights are an approximation as these lights change their color as they age. Even new, they can be different colors (degrees of Kelvin) depending on the exact type of light. Often this is close enough that we don't need much correction.

RAW allows better correction than JPG.

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Apr 10, 2018 00:11:05   #
mvovr
 
Thank you so much! I was so disappointed when, after my class, my photos at the rink still didnt come out as I envisioned them. I can't wait for the next game!

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Apr 10, 2018 06:32:22   #
Jaackil
 
First that is a pretty good image! Good job. You just need to correct your horizon in that one. A couple of suggestions for you. As others have said use manual with auto iso. Do not be afraid to let the iso go up to 3200 or higher if need be. Your shutter speed needs to be 800 or higher. Appeture as wide open as your lens will go. Use exposure compensation if you have to gain a stop or two. Look up back button focusing and learn how to set your camera to use it. Put your focus point on the torso of the player, not the head. Faces will be a little soft but overall this will result in more “in focus keepers”. In hockey players heads move to fast and are small to keep a good focus on by the time you take the shot the head will be gone but the torso gives you a much bigger area to focus on. If you are shooting through the glass bring something to kneel or sit on so you can shoot through the bottom of the glass where it meets the dasher that is usually the cleanest area with the least puck marks. Shoot Faces like you did in this picture, faces make for better shots. Too many parents shoot backs and think they got great images. Faces show the emotion of the game. Resign your self to doing post processing for Hockey. There is very little way around it for Hockey. Shoot raw not jpg it will give you much more control in post even though it will take more time. Lastly Debbie enjoy every minute of it! From a Hockey Dad of 3 boys the youngest just having played his last high school game. It’s a great ride and your images will capture great memories. I hope some of this helps. Good luck.

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Apr 10, 2018 10:26:28   #
ebbote
 
Welcome to the Forum Debbie, enjoy.

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Apr 10, 2018 11:22:35   #
gvarner (a regular here)
 
For focusing issue, learn how to set your camera for back button focusing and use Continuous for your focus mode. The Continuous mode will allow the camer to follow the subject with the focus, most helpful when moving to you or away from you, not so much side to side. Back button controls focus separate from the shutter button. As long as you're holding it down while following the action the focus will follow until you press the shutter. I like to use a shorter focal length and crop in post rather than getting a tight crop with limited DoF.

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Apr 10, 2018 12:02:14   #
mvovr
 
Very helpful, thanks! I understand it all except the back button? Where is that?

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Apr 10, 2018 12:07:29   #
mvovr
 
Wow! Thanks so much! That is my daughter. Bragging a bit, she got a scholarship to play D1 hockey out east when she was in 9th grade. She graduates high school this year. Her goal is winter Olympics 2024, so I need to get my technique down!!

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Apr 10, 2018 13:10:59   #
Jaackil
 
mvovr wrote:
Very helpful, thanks! I understand it all except the back button? Where is that?


Back Button focusing is simply separating your shutter button and focus button to a button on the back of the camera. So instead of holding the shutter down half way to focus you will use your AE/AF button on the rear of the camera using your thumb. To do it you will have to go into the menu and reassign that button. If you google D5300 Back Button Focus setup there will be several videos to show you how here is one
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MjXExt3fK38
Then google using back button focus and you will find lots of videos to show you how to use it.
It does take some getting used to but once you do you will never go back. It makes shooting sports so much easier. But it will take a little practice.

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Apr 10, 2018 13:22:00   #
Jaackil
 
mvovr wrote:
Wow! Thanks so much! That is my daughter. Bragging a bit, she got a scholarship to play D1 hockey out east when she was in 9th grade. She graduates high school this year. Her goal is winter Olympics 2024, so I need to get my technique down!!


Congratulations that is awesome! I know the feeling! I have son playing in college now. Your in for a lot of fun and so isn’t she Many of the D1 rinks have much better lighting than you are used to due to the fact games are telivised especially the Hockey East Games. Ones that are not televised are streamed live in the internet. The same rules will apply for exposure but you will be able to get away with lower ISO’s and maybe faster shutter speeds.

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Apr 10, 2018 13:40:13   #
67skylark27
 
Check out the sports photography section, there are some good hockey threads there. I posted some hockey ones there
and I believe posted what my settings were and what worked and what doesn't.
What hasn't been mentioned yet is the lens you are using is holding you back. For dark rinks and fast action
you need fast glass. I shot plenty with the d5300 - more volleyball but it applies the same for hockey.
I shoot with primes and love it! That translates to fast shutter speeds, lower iso and less photo editing.
Plus shoot RAW. I sit right on the glass and don't bother shooting at anything past center ice, you need
a crazy lens for that.
Most of my hockey shots are around 1/1250th at iso 1250 at f1.8 in raw. I use single point, AF-C continuous for focus
and it gets me the most keepers. I don't use auto iso for sports just yet, and use Lightroom for post.

http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-516640-1.html

http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-513493-1.html

http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-511814-1.html

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Apr 10, 2018 16:16:31   #
crazydaddio
 
mvovr wrote:
Hi! This is Debbie! I've fiddled with a DSL since my kids were little, & what came out was fine. Ive upgraded to a Nikon D 5300 & took a class, wanting to get serious & get better pics that dont need so much post editing. I'm doing okay, until it comes time to hit the ice rink! Between the sheet of ice, bright fluorescent light, & fast movement, I'm a mess! I like to use my 70-300 lens to get close-ups, but it won't always auto focus for me. Shooting in shutter priority helps a bit, but my shots come out dark with the ice looking gray. What the heck?!
So this shot had some editing...I'd like to get this with my settings. Thanks!
Hi! This is Debbie! I've fiddled with a DSL since ... (show quote)


Lighting doesnt change in a hockey game.
Go full manual and take a few moments while they are in warmup to get your settings right.(also best for getting the personal shots as they circle the ice...position yourself behind the glass at rink level goalie left halfway between goalie and side. They typically skate counterclockwise...if not, stroll the the other side)
Pre-game prep:
Setup BBF (already mentioned)
Pick a whitebalance (easier to "bulk" fix in Lightroom afterwards)
Aperature wide open (ie lowest F value)
Continuous mode for focusing
AF use center pt spot focus only
Shutter speed can be as low as 500 (stick and puck blur but the heads will be sharp) or higher.
...lastly bump the ISO until the darks of the jerseys are underexposed a little but still have some detail (you can pull them up with the shadow slider in LR)
Drive mode continuous

Once you have these set, hold the BBF button down and "point and shoot" for the rest of the game and focus on anticipating the action vs fighting with your settings.

You mentioned struggling with getting good focus. Recommend you set the AF center pt only.... on most consumer cameras (and pro too ) center pt is best and your only hope of getting good AF in sports.

Another tip is to prefocus on the goalie, take finger off BBF, reframe so the goalie is in 1 side of the frame...hold steady and take eye off viewfinder and watch the action. Trigger when the shot is taken....can use a tripod but better to just find a way to steady the camera. You can also stay in the viewfinder and open both eyes using peripheral vision to anticpate the action without losing the framing.

Have fun shooting!


(Download)

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Apr 13, 2018 09:31:04   #
Jaackil
 
crazydaddio wrote:
Lighting doesnt change in a hockey game.
Go full manual and take a few moments while they are in warmup to get your settings right.(also best for getting the personal shots as they circle the ice...position yourself behind the glass at rink level goalie left halfway between goalie and side. They typically skate counterclockwise...if not, stroll the the other side)
Pre-game prep:
Setup BBF (already mentioned)
Pick a whitebalance (easier to "bulk" fix in Lightroom afterwards)
Aperature wide open (ie lowest F value)
Continuous mode for focusing
AF use center pt spot focus only
Shutter speed can be as low as 500 (stick and puck blur but the heads will be sharp) or higher.
...lastly bump the ISO until the darks of the jerseys are underexposed a little but still have some detail (you can pull them up with the shadow slider in LR)
Drive mode continuous

Once you have these set, hold the BBF button down and "point and shoot" for the rest of the game and focus on anticipating the action vs fighting with your settings.

You mentioned struggling with getting good focus. Recommend you set the AF center pt only.... on most consumer cameras (and pro too ) center pt is best and your only hope of getting good AF in sports.

Another tip is to prefocus on the goalie, take finger off BBF, reframe so the goalie is in 1 side of the frame...hold steady and take eye off viewfinder and watch the action. Trigger when the shot is taken....can use a tripod but better to just find a way to steady the camera. You can also stay in the viewfinder and open both eyes using peripheral vision to anticpate the action without losing the framing.

Have fun shooting!
Lighting doesnt change in a hockey game. br Go ful... (show quote)


I disagree with “lighting does not change in hockey games”. The actual lighting does not change but unless you are in an NHL rink the lighting can vary greatly. There are many areas in most rinks where the lighting can vary greatly and effect your exposure. Most rinks are not very evenly lit. That is where auto ISO can be a big help and save time in post processing.

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