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Feb 20, 2018 17:40:32   #
gunflint
 
Hello, I have the Nikon D850 so I wanted to upgrade my monitor to take advantage of the image quality from this camera. I bought a monitor with the following specs:

27" In-Plane Switching (IPS) Panel
DVI-DL / HDMI 1.4 / DP 1.2 Inputs
2560 x 1440 Resolution
1000:1 Contrast Ratio
350 cd/m² Brightness
178°/178° Viewing Angles
5 ms (GtG) Response Time
1.07 Billion Color Support
OSD Controller to Switch Color Modes
99% AdobeRGB Color Gamut

I thought that one with the 99% Adobe RGB or greater was best since I use this in LR and PS. My question is this - the monitor has amazing colors, sharpness, etc. but it seems that images I create with this look flat on other computers, TV, etc. Is this because they may be in SRGB color so they look under saturated? I don't really understand how this works but perhaps some of you can help explain it to me. I don't know if there are different settings I should use or if this is just the way it is. I can still return this monitor if there is a better option for me.

Thanks much!

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Feb 20, 2018 17:45:31   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
First, you need a hardware based monitor calibrator like a Spyder Pro to get accurate color. Second, other monitors will display colors differently, particularly if they are not also calibrated. Monitors, right out of the box, are too bright and too blue, being maximized with games and the internet in mind.

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Feb 20, 2018 17:50:10   #
WayneT
 
This is the one I have https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1224162-REG/lg_27ud68_p_27_widescreen_led.html. Notice the resolution difference to the one you are looking at as well as the LG still has the 99% sRGB gamut. Definitely stay with the IPS Panel and don't get a TTL panel. The TTL's are good gaming monitors but not to good for what we do. I really enjoy mine and I use it primarily to fine tune photographs.

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Feb 20, 2018 18:23:49   #
rjaywallace (a regular here)
 
gunflint wrote:
Hello, I have the Nikon D850 so I wanted to upgrade my monitor to take advantage of the image quality from this camera. I bought a monitor with the following specs:

27" In-Plane Switching (IPS) Panel
DVI-DL / HDMI 1.4 / DP 1.2 Inputs
2560 x 1440 Resolution
1000:1 Contrast Ratio
350 cd/m² Brightness
178°/178° Viewing Angles
5 ms (GtG) Response Time
1.07 Billion Color Support
OSD Controller to Switch Color Modes
99% AdobeRGB Color Gamut

I thought that one with the 99% Adobe RGB or greater was best since I use this in LR and PS. My question is this - the monitor has amazing colors, sharpness, etc. but it seems that images I create with this look flat on other computers, TV, etc. Is this because they may be in SRGB color so they look under saturated? I don't really understand how this works but perhaps some of you can help explain it to me. I don't know if there are different settings I should use or if this is just the way it is. I can still return this monitor if there is a better option for me. Thanks much!
Hello, I have the Nikon D850 so I wanted to upgrad... (show quote)

Gunflint - You should be aware that you can purchase tools to calibrate your monitors, tablets and TV screens so that you see the same or nearly the same colors on each device. Check with B&H, for example, to explore the devices available and how they are used. To the extent that your question involves printed images, you should be aware that UHH has a separate section devoted to “Printers And Color Printing”. You can access that section by clicking the “All Sections”link at the bottom of this page and then scrolling down to the “Printers And...” section. Folks there will be happy to help you sort out any issues you may be experiencing. Good luck and happy shooting. /Ralph

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Feb 20, 2018 18:39:01   #
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Feb 20, 2018 18:41:42   #
rjaywallace (a regular here)
 
Cdouthitt wrote:
http://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-34WK650-W-ultrawide-monitor
With a spider pro.

What model of Spider Pro do you recommend for a non-professional, but serious, photo enthusiast?

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Feb 20, 2018 19:31:45   #
Cdouthitt
 
rjaywallace wrote:
What model of Spider Pro do you recommend for a non-professional, but serious, photo enthusiast?


https://www.amazon.com/Datacolor-Spyder5EXPRESS-Designed-Hobbyist-Photographers/dp/B00UBSL2TO

We use the pro version in our design studio, but honestly we probably could have gotten away with above version (but I don’t think they had it back then).

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Feb 20, 2018 20:18:16   #
gunflint
 
Thanks to all of you for your suggestions and links. I will spend some further time investigating.

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Feb 20, 2018 20:29:53   #
bdk
 
I would say its because u have a great monitor and they dont. I have an acer and a HP monitor both connected to my computer, even though I have calibrated them with my color munki, the HP has richer brighter colors colors.

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Feb 21, 2018 00:00:02   #
Bill Munny
 
rjaywallace wrote:
What model of Spider Pro do you recommend for a non-professional, but serious, photo enthusiast?


Spyder5Pro, great tool. You cannot go wrong with this model.


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Feb 21, 2018 05:49:14   #
Gene51 (a regular here)
 
gunflint wrote:
Hello, I have the Nikon D850 so I wanted to upgrade my monitor to take advantage of the image quality from this camera. I bought a monitor with the following specs:

27" In-Plane Switching (IPS) Panel
DVI-DL / HDMI 1.4 / DP 1.2 Inputs
2560 x 1440 Resolution
1000:1 Contrast Ratio
350 cd/m² Brightness
178°/178° Viewing Angles
5 ms (GtG) Response Time
1.07 Billion Color Support
OSD Controller to Switch Color Modes
99% AdobeRGB Color Gamut

I thought that one with the 99% Adobe RGB or greater was best since I use this in LR and PS. My question is this - the monitor has amazing colors, sharpness, etc. but it seems that images I create with this look flat on other computers, TV, etc. Is this because they may be in SRGB color so they look under saturated? I don't really understand how this works but perhaps some of you can help explain it to me. I don't know if there are different settings I should use or if this is just the way it is. I can still return this monitor if there is a better option for me.

Thanks much!
Hello, I have the Nikon D850 so I wanted to upgrad... (show quote)


If you have a Dell display (or any other) with a programmable LUT, a Spyder will be of no use to you. You'll need an Xrite i1 Display Pro at the minimum to properly profile the display.

https://photographylife.com/how-to-properly-calibrate-dell-u2413-u2713h-u3014-monitors

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Feb 21, 2018 06:35:14   #
Heather Iles
 
Gene51 wrote:
If you have a Dell display (or any other) with a programmable LUT, a Spyder will be of no use to you. You'll need an Xrite i1 Display Pro at the minimum to properly profile the display.

https://photographylife.com/how-to-properly-calibrate-dell-u2413-u2713h-u3014-monitors


I had a Spider Pro 5, but now have an Xrite i1 which is superior.

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Feb 21, 2018 07:19:42   #
Cape Coral Joel
 
The xrite i1 is the way to go. I wonder why you didn't go with a 4k monitor. The prices have come down a lot and the image quality is far superior and that would do the 850 justice.

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Feb 21, 2018 11:20:01   #
cjc2 (a regular here)
 
Nice thing about an iMac is you can get one with a 27" 5k Retina display. Awesome, D850 or not! Best of luck.

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Feb 21, 2018 12:20:36   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
gunflint wrote:
Hello, I have the Nikon D850 so I wanted to upgrade my monitor to take advantage of the image quality from this camera. I bought a monitor with the following specs:

27" In-Plane Switching (IPS) Panel
DVI-DL / HDMI 1.4 / DP 1.2 Inputs
2560 x 1440 Resolution
1000:1 Contrast Ratio
350 cd/m² Brightness
178°/178° Viewing Angles
5 ms (GtG) Response Time
1.07 Billion Color Support
OSD Controller to Switch Color Modes
99% AdobeRGB Color Gamut

I thought that one with the 99% Adobe RGB or greater was best since I use this in LR and PS. My question is this - the monitor has amazing colors, sharpness, etc. but it seems that images I create with this look flat on other computers, TV, etc. Is this because they may be in SRGB color so they look under saturated? I don't really understand how this works but perhaps some of you can help explain it to me. I don't know if there are different settings I should use or if this is just the way it is. I can still return this monitor if there is a better option for me.

Thanks much!
Hello, I have the Nikon D850 so I wanted to upgrad... (show quote)


Several things:

Get a calibration kit from Datacolor or X-RITE. Follow the instructions to the letter.

Be sure you are making output files in the right color space! The usual reason JPEG images look great on a monitor capable of full Adobe RGB color space, and flat, lifeless, embalmed, and dead on other peoples' monitors, is that you set the color space for your output files to Adobe RGB instead of sRGB!

Adobe RGB is a good "working color space," but it is used by VERY FEW photographic labs. It is primarily used by (perhaps preferred by) the CMYK++ graphic arts world (lithographers). If you are in the real world, where over 90% of images are viewed on the Internet, your images should be JPEGs in sRGB color space.

Profile setup is very important. Having a custom ICC profile for your calibrated monitor is the starting point. Without that, I'd just give up! My Spyder5Pro is the best $150 I ever spent on any digital photography device.

Aim points for calibration are very important, too, if you print.

Black Point 0.5 cd/m^2
White Point 80 to 120 cd/m^2
Color temperature 6500°K
Gamma, if adjustable, 2.2

It is very important to turn down the brightness to the range mentioned (maximum 80 to 120 cd/m^2). Otherwise, prints and screen won't match.

Monitor location matters, too.

Gray surroundings are ideal. Eliminate brightly colored objects from peripheral vision.
Set your computer desktop to middle gray, or slightly darker.
Subdued, indirect, 5000°K lighting
NO glare off the screen, especially when calibrating.

Don't expect to adjust images accurately if you are upset, just came in from daylight, drank a lot of caffeinated beverages, use illegal drugs, or are pregnant. All of those things affect your color vision.

Allow monitors to warm up for an hour before calibration/profiling, and ten minutes or so before critical image adjustment.

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