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Nikon D850 users - need help
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Dec 26, 2017 14:26:20   #
gunflint
 
Hello,

I have only had my camera for a few weeks and last week had a chance to try the focus shifting feature. I have a couple of questions that maybe some of you are able to answer. I have just talked with Nikon tech help and they can't answer anything, "they are just learning" I was told.

1 - I have the setting to create a new folder each time. It does that but quite often other photos that have nothing to do with the focus shift sequence are also in that folder. Also bracketed shots can be in the folder.

2 - It seems like I cannot get over about 25 or so photos taken before it gets to infinity and stops. The setting can go up to 300. I do have the "focus width" set to 1 which is the lowest number. This should result in the maximum number of shots, correct? I understand that the lens and other settings can affect how many shots it would take to get to infinity focus. I am generally starting with the focus point a couple of feet in front of me. Are any of you able to get even 50 photos in the sequence?

Thank you for your help!

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Dec 26, 2017 18:05:10   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
Do you have your focus step width set to "Narrow?"

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Dec 26, 2017 18:09:30   #
gunflint
 
Yes, #1

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Dec 26, 2017 19:00:24   #
Steve Perry
 
To answer your questions:

1. This is normal - and annoying IMO. You can however switch back to your original folder from the Photo Shooting Menu > Storage Folder> and then Select Folder From List.

2. That's normal behavior. For landscape type shots, you don't need as many images focus stacked - all you need is overlap. In fact, most of the time you can do an effective stack with less than a dozen shots - for really wide stuff, less than 4 or 5. Where the higher numbers come into play is for 1:1 macro work.

Also, I did quite a bit of testing (spent nearly a week on it) and the focus width setting is basically an overlap setting and seems more or less consistent from lens to lens and from f/stop to f/stop. I found that a setting of 4 worked perfectly well for everything from macros to landscapes - and you don't need as many shots to pull it off. More isn't necessarily better, you just need a proper amount of overlap for your focus stacking software. The fewer shots you shoot, the less chance of errors (like blowing leaves, grass, other movement).

I cover how to use this feature in my AF book, but I also give quite a bit of detail in my D850 review. If you just want the focus stacking info, start at 22.38 in the video.

https://backcountrygallery.com/nikon-d850-review/

Also, if you scroll (way) down the page, I have the settings I use with focus stacking for both landscape and macro work.

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Dec 26, 2017 19:14:51   #
gunflint
 
That's a BIG help Steve, thanks. I follow you on youtube!

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Dec 26, 2017 20:46:13   #
Steve Perry
 
Happy to help :)

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Dec 27, 2017 09:54:28   #
mborn
 
Steve Perry wrote:
To answer your questions:

1. This is normal - and annoying IMO. You can however switch back to your original folder from the Photo Shooting Menu > Storage Folder> and then Select Folder From List.

2. That's normal behavior. For landscape type shots, you don't need as many images focus stacked - all you need is overlap. In fact, most of the time you can do an effective stack with less than a dozen shots - for really wide stuff, less than 4 or 5. Where the higher numbers come into play is for 1:1 macro work.

Also, I did quite a bit of testing (spent nearly a week on it) and the focus width setting is basically an overlap setting and seems more or less consistent from lens to lens and from f/stop to f/stop. I found that a setting of 4 worked perfectly well for everything from macros to landscapes - and you don't need as many shots to pull it off. More isn't necessarily better, you just need a proper amount of overlap for your focus stacking software. The fewer shots you shoot, the less chance of errors (like blowing leaves, grass, other movement).

I cover how to use this feature in my AF book, but I also give quite a bit of detail in my D850 review. If you just want the focus stacking info, start at 22.38 in the video.

https://backcountrygallery.com/nikon-d850-review/

Also, if you scroll (way) down the page, I have the settings I use with focus stacking for both landscape and macro work.
To answer your questions: br br 1. This is normal... (show quote)



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