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Canon 10-18mm users-Question
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Oct 17, 2017 00:51:25   #
machia (a regular here)
 
I recently purchased an STM 10-18mm lens for my Canon APS-C camera and would like to take some landscape shots when the leaves turn in a few weeks . I'd like to utilize a CPL and a Color Enhancing filter . My question is ; will using these two filters together cause vignetting ? And can one or the other used alone cause vignetting ?
And if yes , what is the remedy ?
Thank you in advance , I would greatly appreciate some advice .

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Oct 17, 2017 02:31:57   #
Photocraig (a regular here)
 
I have this lens. Only after mounting the filter(s) will you be ale to tell if you will get vignetting. However, if you Zoom in to 12 or 14mm, (Experiment) you should avoid interference from the filter(s). I don't think I'd ever stack anything with a Polarizer.

Personally, I wouldn't use a Polarizer on the focal lengths of this lens to darken the sky. The field of view is so wide that you will likely see gradations of the polarizing effect. Unless you shoot vertically. Using it to cut reflections and enhance leaf colors should work of close in scenes. When I use this lens I find a very near focal point of major interest and use the entire field of view to emphasize the main subject.

You Tube has several instructional videos on how to use an Ultra Wide lens. This is a very nice lens and will deliver for you. But it is different than using longer focal lengths. As a landscape lens the individual features in the landscape like trees, boulders, etc. will be rendered small because the field of view encompasses such a wide view. And, you weill need to include foreground elements or you will tend to see acres of sky. That's OK with nice clouds and golden hour colors, etc. But contrary to initial thought, using an Ultra Wide for landscapes takes alot of thought and composition framing decisions. My opinion is the Ultra wides are best used indoors and for near far relationships outdoors.

My suggestion is to look at the videos and seek out some photos done with these focl lengths to et new ideas. It really is a different way of seeing. There is more to it yhan super-peripheral vision. But it is fun and a challenge.

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Oct 17, 2017 06:18:24   #
machia (a regular here)
 
Photocraig wrote:
I have this lens. Only after mounting the filter(s) will you be ale to tell if you will get vignetting. However, if you Zoom in to 12 or 14mm, (Experiment) you should avoid interference from the filter(s). I don't think I'd ever stack anything with a Polarizer.

Personally, I wouldn't use a Polarizer on the focal lengths of this lens to darken the sky. The field of view is so wide that you will likely see gradations of the polarizing effect. Unless you shoot vertically. Using it to cut reflections and enhance leaf colors should work of close in scenes. When I use this lens I find a very near focal point of major interest and use the entire field of view to emphasize the main subject.

You Tube has several instructional videos on how to use an Ultra Wide lens. This is a very nice lens and will deliver for you. But it is different than using longer focal lengths. As a landscape lens the individual features in the landscape like trees, boulders, etc. will be rendered small because the field of view encompasses such a wide view. And, you weill need to include foreground elements or you will tend to see acres of sky. That's OK with nice clouds and golden hour colors, etc. But contrary to initial thought, using an Ultra Wide for landscapes takes alot of thought and composition framing decisions. My opinion is the Ultra wides are best used indoors and for near far relationships outdoors.

My suggestion is to look at the videos and seek out some photos done with these focl lengths to et new ideas. It really is a different way of seeing. There is more to it yhan super-peripheral vision. But it is fun and a challenge.
I have this lens. Only after mounting the filter(s... (show quote)

Thank you for your in depth comment ! When I used to shoot film I had a 19-35mm lens that I experimented with . The elements that you refer to are certainly something to consider in composing shots with a wide angle lens . My thought of stacking a CPL filter along w/ a Color Enhancement filter are only because I've been reading a few articles as to their dramatic effects when shooting landscapes , especially when trying to capture the colors of the Fall season . Thank you again .

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Oct 18, 2017 06:30:31   #
sb (a regular here)
 
Photograig's response is everything you need! What is a "color enhancing filter"? It sounds like another term for a polarizing filter - and if it is you will lose a LOT of light stacking them together for not additional gain (and if you rotate them to just right you will get NO light!). I have used the polarizer on the Canon 10-22mm lens without any vignetting, but you will get variable blues in the sky with any big sky shots.

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Oct 18, 2017 06:59:11   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
machia wrote:
I recently purchased an STM 10-18mm lens for my Canon APS-C camera and would like to take some landscape shots when the leaves turn in a few weeks . I'd like to utilize a CPL and a Color Enhancing filter . My question is ; will using these two filters together cause vignetting ? And can one or the other used alone cause vignetting ?
And if yes , what is the remedy ?
Thank you in advance , I would greatly appreciate some advice .


I bet that combo shot at 10mm will get you vignetting. Some filters are advertised as being "thin" to avoid that problem, but a CPL is thicker, so beware! The CPL itself should give you improved color. You can do color enhancing in post processing. Remember, you have to be at 90° to the sun to get the most benefit from a CPL.

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Oct 18, 2017 07:25:06   #
Blurryeyed (a regular here)
 
machia wrote:
I recently purchased an STM 10-18mm lens for my Canon APS-C camera and would like to take some landscape shots when the leaves turn in a few weeks . I'd like to utilize a CPL and a Color Enhancing filter . My question is ; will using these two filters together cause vignetting ? And can one or the other used alone cause vignetting ?
And if yes , what is the remedy ?
Thank you in advance , I would greatly appreciate some advice .


Filters for ultra-wides are typically very thin, they are specifically designed for the extreme wide angle views of these lenses, if you are using a filter designed for a normal lens you may get some vignetting with just the one filter and will definitely have a problem when using two filters stacked. As someone suggested earlier the remedy is to shoot at 12 or 14mm, zoom in until vignetting is no longer a problem.

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Oct 18, 2017 07:46:20   #
pithydoug
 
machia wrote:
I recently purchased an STM 10-18mm lens for my Canon APS-C camera and would like to take some landscape shots when the leaves turn in a few weeks . I'd like to utilize a CPL and a Color Enhancing filter . My question is ; will using these two filters together cause vignetting ? And can one or the other used alone cause vignetting ?
And if yes , what is the remedy ?
Thank you in advance , I would greatly appreciate some advice .


Unless you are shooting water, through a window or the sun is overhead just do your color enhancements in post.

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Oct 18, 2017 08:51:11   #
machia (a regular here)
 
Thanks to all here . I think I'll just use a CPL . Makes sense !

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Oct 18, 2017 09:15:55   #
Picture Taker
 
On a 10mm lense your lens is so wide that the polarizer will not give even distribution of polarization. Your 10mm is really 16mm on your Canon C size camera. The 10mm on a full size would even be worse with a polarizer.

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Oct 18, 2017 09:27:30   #
RolandDieter
 
Polarizing filters on very wide angle lenses results in darkened skies (and other polarizing effects) on one side of the image and light skies (and the other effects) on the other side. This causes a post-processing nightmare. With wide angle it is better to post-process enhance a shot taken without the polarizer.

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Oct 18, 2017 09:35:21   #
machia (a regular here)
 
Picture Taker wrote:
On a 10mm lense your lens is so wide that the polarizer will not give even distribution of polarization. Your 10mm is really 16mm on your Canon C size camera. The 10mm on a full size would even be worse with a polarizer.

Can a CPL filter be used with good effect at the 18mm ( 28.8mm ) focal length ?

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Oct 18, 2017 09:38:29   #
Picture Taker
 
Try HDR (3 shots +2 and -2) I use Photomatix. They have free trials.

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Oct 18, 2017 10:06:08   #
Notorious T.O.D.
 
machia wrote:
Thanks to all here . I think I'll just use a CPL . Makes sense !



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Oct 18, 2017 10:26:37   #
gvarner (a regular here)
 
machia wrote:
I recently purchased an STM 10-18mm lens for my Canon APS-C camera and would like to take some landscape shots when the leaves turn in a few weeks . I'd like to utilize a CPL and a Color Enhancing filter . My question is ; will using these two filters together cause vignetting ? And can one or the other used alone cause vignetting ?
And if yes , what is the remedy ?
Thank you in advance , I would greatly appreciate some advice .


Compose a little wider and crop in post if necessary.

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Oct 18, 2017 11:19:41   #
davidrb
 
machia wrote:
I recently purchased an STM 10-18mm lens for my Canon APS-C camera and would like to take some landscape shots when the leaves turn in a few weeks . I'd like to utilize a CPL and a Color Enhancing filter . My question is ; will using these two filters together cause vignetting ? And can one or the other used alone cause vignetting ?
And if yes , what is the remedy ?
Thank you in advance , I would greatly appreciate some advice .


I do not have the lens you mention, but can offer some help on the color enhancer. B+W markets a "Redhancer" filter that will get extra pop for your fall color photos. It accentuates the reds, oranges, and browns. The CPL, while necessary at times will be a detriment for most of what you shoot, 90 degrees across.....etc., etc. The Redhancer will work at all angles, and doesn't eat light as a CPL does. Be sure and specify "thin line" when ordering. Have fun with it.

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