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Camera shake
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May 15, 2017 13:00:34   #
imagemeister (a regular here)
 
tarsen wrote:
I attended a college graduation last Friday. This was at the hockey arena at the University of Minnesota and we sat about 1/2 way up in the stands. I would guess about 400 ft. to the stage. I used my new Rebel T6I with my Tamron 70 to 200 lense (set to max = 300 mm for APC). Most of the pictures were taken at 160 sec at 2.8. I see camera shake in everyone.
Is/was there anything I could have done to reduce that? I don't think even a monopod would have helped.


A properly use monopod - preferably with facial stabilization - higher shutter and ISO.

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May 15, 2017 13:35:51   #
anotherview (a regular here)
 
Set Shutter Speed higher, to match the effective focal length of the lens. So if shooting at 300mm, the effective focal length becomes the product of 300 X 1.6, equaling 1/420 second.

The T6i uses a cropped sensor smaller than a standard 35mm sensor, increasing effective focal length, by a factor of 1.6.

Set ISO higher to allow a faster Shutter Speed.

Make sure the Vibration Reduction switch on your lens is set to On.

Properly stabilize your lens for handholding it while shooting.

Practice these techniques to learn how they affect results.

Note that Photoshop Creative Cloud has a filter called Camera Shake Reduction that reduces image blur happening from internal camera and lens motion. You may profit from learning and using this filter. For most images, this filter effectively brings out the potential of the lens optics. The mechanical operation of the camera and lens introduce a micro-blur that the CSR filer compensates for, sharpening the image as if the native optics functioned at optimum.

A monopod could help, too.

Good luck.
tarsen wrote:
I attended a college graduation last Friday. This was at the hockey arena at the University of Minnesota and we sat about 1/2 way up in the stands. I would guess about 400 ft. to the stage. I used my new Rebel T6I with my Tamron 70 to 200 lense (set to max = 300 mm for APC). Most of the pictures were taken at 160 sec at 2.8. I see camera shake in everyone.
Is/was there anything I could have done to reduce that? I don't think even a monopod would have helped.

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May 15, 2017 13:58:29   #
tarsen
 
Here is what I had that did not work.
ISO Auto max 3200
Program Mode
Auto focus
Tamron 70 - 200 (no IS on this lens)

I am going to try
ISO Auto max 6400
Program mode
Auto Focus
Same lens

Also try
TV set to 1/320
Auto ISO max 6400
Same lens

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May 15, 2017 14:16:29   #
Kroy
 
Tripod (or even monopod) would have absolutely helped. If your lens /camera doesn't have any type of compensation for shakiness, you're bound for trouble unless you're one of the very few folks who happen to have super steady hands. Some can train for that with enough practice, others can't. The more you zoom in somewhere, the worse things get. If you zoomed in with that zoom lens of yours, you're almost guaranteed camera shake, at any setting. So yes, for shots like this you very likely need some kind of physical stabilization - tripod, monopod, or even a chair you can rest your lens on.

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May 15, 2017 14:16:41   #
TriX (a regular here)
 
Note that the OP stated that the bought the non-VC version of this lens on page 1 ("...Did not buy the image stabilization on the Tamron lense."), so suggestions that he use VC/VR/IS won't help.

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May 15, 2017 14:19:28   #
IDDOC
 
In addition to the suggestions already put forth I shoot each picture in bursts of 2 or 3. In this way I hope to get one that is sharper than the others. With the size and low cost of todays SD cards there is no problem with that many shots. Then at home on your big screen you can choose the sharpest image and delete the others.

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May 15, 2017 14:23:37   #
TriX (a regular here)
 
tarsen wrote:
Here is what I had that did not work.
ISO Auto max 3200
Program Mode
Auto focus
Tamron 70 - 200 (no IS on this lens)

I am going to try
ISO Auto max 6400
Program mode
Auto Focus
Same lens

Also try
TV set to 1/320
Auto ISO max 6400
Same lens


I would suggest forgetting Program mode, using manual mode set for 1/320 - 1/500 as you suggested, and shoot with the aperture wide open and auto ISO. If you were really 400' away (which is WAY too far for this lens), depth-of-field is not an issue, even wide open, if you were properly focused.

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May 15, 2017 14:27:35   #
Gene51 (a regular here)
 
tarsen wrote:
Here is what I had that did not work.
ISO Auto max 3200
Program Mode
Auto focus
Tamron 70 - 200 (no IS on this lens)

I am going to try
ISO Auto max 6400
Program mode
Auto Focus
Same lens

Also try
TV set to 1/320
Auto ISO max 6400
Same lens


I don't think you'll like ISO 6400. You might want to read this:

http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=30085.0

http://www.cameraegg.org/high-iso-comparison-canon-80d-vs-70d-vs-nikon-d7200/

I do applaud you for not giving in on this. . . I would work really hard to try to extract the best possible image quality from my gear. But there is a point where it is better to consider other alternatives. Rental of a 6D or 5D Mark IV maybe?

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May 15, 2017 16:51:46   #
Mi630
 
I would have shot in shutter priority set to about 1/500. Auto ISO. I don't know if you were trying to get a picture of the student walking. If so you could have tried to pan with the student. Image stabilization won't help much if the subject is moving. The other thing that really helps is to shoot a burst of 6-8 shots. This comes from a Scott Kelby book with the idea being one or two will be in focus and sharper. I have done that and gotten good results. Just a little tip.

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May 15, 2017 18:40:01   #
zoomphoto
 
Years ago (pre stabilization) I happened upon a photographer using an unusual technique to steady his camera.
He grabbed his right arm, just at the shoulder with his left hand, then raised his elbow near chin height. He then laid the camera/lens on his arm near the elbow for stabilization.
Looked about as goofy as it sounds, but to this day I use the technique and it works great.

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May 15, 2017 21:54:23   #
jblazar
 
Were in stands or seated on the ground? If in stands, they may have been moving/vibrating.

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May 15, 2017 22:49:41   #
PhotosBySteve
 
tarsen wrote:
I attended a college graduation last Friday. This was at the hockey arena at the University of Minnesota and we sat about 1/2 way up in the stands. I would guess about 400 ft. to the stage. I used my new Rebel T6I with my Tamron 70 to 200 lense (set to max = 300 mm for APC). Most of the pictures were taken at 160 sec at 2.8. I see camera shake in everyone.
Is/was there anything I could have done to reduce that? I don't think even a monopod would have helped.


For your setup, 1/320 shutter speed would be the slowest setting to use to avoid camera shake. Just have the double the ISO setting from what was set for your 1/160 shutter speed.

Minimum shutter speed is the reciprocal of the longest lens focal length times the crop factor. 1/200mm * 1.5 = 1/300sec, so use 1/320 to be safe. Or use a tripod for slower speeds.

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May 16, 2017 00:27:28   #
anotherview (a regular here)
 
Yes:

(1) "I would have shot in shutter priority set to about 1/500. Auto ISO."

(2) "The other thing that really helps is to shoot a burst of 6-8 shots. ... the idea being one or two will be in focus and sharper."

But from my experience with the T61, I can tell you that above ISO 800, the image noise becomes unacceptable, at least in my eyes.

You could try setting ISO at 800, with the Shutter Speed set to 500 sec or faster, to see what happens to the Aperture.

Stating the obvious, you may wish to consider buying a long lens with vibration reduction. With careful technique, VR gains about 3 to 4 stops of Exposure.
Mi630 wrote:
I would have shot in shutter priority set to about 1/500. Auto ISO. I don't know if you were trying to get a picture of the student walking. If so you could have tried to pan with the student. Image stabilization won't help much if the subject is moving. The other thing that really helps is to shoot a burst of 6-8 shots. This comes from a Scott Kelby book with the idea being one or two will be in focus and sharper. I have done that and gotten good results. Just a little tip.

| Reply
May 16, 2017 06:02:38   #
tarsen
 
cthahn wrote:
Shutter speed is to slow.


My 70 - 200 would work and yours should work also. I do not have IS on my lens. Faster shutter speed should help.

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May 16, 2017 06:06:57   #
tarsen
 
I looked at all the pictures (can't call them photographs) and found nothing in focus. That leads me to believe it is camera shake.


GENorkus wrote:
Contrary to popular thought, I'm going to be one who says it's not motion blur at least not to a major degree. To me it looks more like a focusing issue.

Many lenses go a touch beyond infinity and that is likely what you are seeing. Plus, you said you used f:2.8 which is, as pointed out by "billnikon" above, not in the "sweet spot".

One lens I have is a Tamron SP 70-210, f:3.5, Push/pull, (from the 1990's era and not used much anymore). A similar photographic result as what your photo is showing seems to be regular. To improve it's output I increased the f setting.

Please note: unless you know what you're doing, the lowest f setting on a lens can get you in trouble.
Instead of f:3.5 I use a minimum of one or two stops higher, (f:5.6-ish) no matter what. You should do similar. Instead of 2.8, try f:4.0 or so.

From what I've found out, most lenses made to cover both crop and full frame sensors, have to find a happy medium and that means one or the other. There are newer designed lenses that do a pretty good job of covering both sizes. Then there are the others.
Contrary to popular thought, I'm going to be one w... (show quote)

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