Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Architectural photography, the Scheimpflug principle and panos
Feb 14, 2016 20:00:28   #
LoneRangeFinder Loc: Left field
 
So I've been thinking of the challenge of dealing with what AA referred to as "the problem of convergence" and the limitations of DSLRs in architectural photography. This led me down the rabbit hole of too much math, the entrance and exit pupils of the lens, nodal points, etc. So, I began constructing a DIY pano head with the idea of using my nifty fifty in a vertical orientation and shooting a series of images that I would then overlap, stitch, or whatever you wish to call it.

So thoughts from those with some experience in these matters would be appreciated.

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Feb 14, 2016 23:56:09   #
Nikonian72 Loc: Long Beach CA
 
Scheimpflug principle requires film (or sensor) mounted on a camera back equipped with swing & tilt, and/or lens mounted on a front board, equipped with swing & tilt. http://luminous-landscape.com/focusing-tilt-shift-lenses
Classic illustration of the Scheimpflug rule in action. The blue area is the captured Depth-of-Field.
Classic illustration of the Scheimpflug rule in ac...
Tilting the lens up simultaneously with an upward shift is at the core of Architectural Photography , since it provides the correct reproduction of vertical lines while at the same time increasing the depth of field. Sigma SD14-FD Mount pictured.
Tilting the lens up simultaneously with an upward ...

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Feb 15, 2016 01:07:14   #
LoneRangeFinder Loc: Left field
 
Thanks. I hope to try my pano head in the next week

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Feb 15, 2016 04:08:59   #
blackest Loc: Ireland
 
This page might be useful: http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/using_tilt.html

If you have an M4/3 camera its possible to get tilt lens adapters quite cheaply that do 8 degrees of tilt. It's a bit crude mine is designed for an EOS lens. If you want shift as well, then $300 will get a shifting adapter too.

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Feb 18, 2016 14:27:34   #
Nightski
 
I think the pano option on a tilt-shift lens comes more from the shift option than the tilt option, correct?
Douglass, I wonder if that link will help me think about how to use my lensbaby more effectively.

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Feb 18, 2016 14:32:00   #
Nikonian72 Loc: Long Beach CA
 
Nightski wrote:
I think the pano option on a tilt-shift lens comes more from the shift option than the tilt option, correct?
Many panos are vertical images stitched together, where the tilt & shift functions are rendered moot on a DSLR. View cameras do not have this restriction.

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Feb 19, 2016 18:35:39   #
Nightski
 
Nikonian72 wrote:
Many panos are vertical images stitched together, where the tilt & shift functions are rendered moot on a DSLR. View cameras do not have this restriction.
That's not true. I watched John Greengo demonstrate a vertical pano in a creative live class. He never used the tilt function to do a pano. Have you ever used a tilt-shift? Do you understand the function of the shift? The Schleimflug Principle does not have anything to do with the shift function. The tilt function results in not having the focal plane flush with the sensor and it creates a very deep DOF or a very shallow DOF. What I am not sure of is if you tilt up or down to get deeper. I am also not clear how it differs from the lensbaby.

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Feb 19, 2016 21:14:30   #
Nikonian72 Loc: Long Beach CA
 
Nightski wrote:
That's not true. I watched John Greengo demonstrate a vertical pano in a creative live class. He never used the tilt function to do a pano.
I NEVER stated that tilt or shift is required for pano. I stated that tilt & shift on DSLR lenses are strictly for vertical corrections in an horizontal format, which makes them moot when a DSLR is turned 90-degrees for a vertical format pano.

Nightski wrote:
Have you ever used a tilt-shift? Do you understand the function of the shift?
I used a 4x5 view camera for years while earning my bachelor's degree from Brooks Institute of Photography. Both front lensboard & backboard of a view camera are capable of swing, tilt, & shift for both vertical and horizontal corrections, where as DSLR lenses can only tilt & shift on the vertical axis.

Nikonian72 wrote:
The Schleimflug Principle does not have anything to do with the shift function. What I am not sure of is if you tilt up or down to get deeper. I am also not clear how it differs from the lensbaby.
The OP of this thread mentioned Scheimflug in the title. If you do not understand this principle, then read what I posted above, and view the image of a TILTED front lens board. Shift is not mentioned.

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Feb 20, 2016 00:32:49   #
LoneRangeFinder Loc: Left field
 
After a few reworks, I am close to finishing my DIY pano head which is specifically designed for verticals. I had to redo the plate to which my DSLR attaches due to a small, but critical miscalculation. I will be adding a bubble level to the plate that attaches to the tripod. By carefully leveling the tripod, using the "virtual horizon" feature on my DSLR, and correctly locating the nodal point, I believe I will be able to create some panos of a few historic buildings in Portland without losing the tops of the buildings or dealing with the need to tilt the lens. I have a few spots picked out.

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Feb 20, 2016 00:53:49   #
lightcatcher Loc: Farmington, NM (4 corners)
 
Note in article it is shown in vertical format about half way down.
Using the 35mm Perspective Control lens http://www.uscoles.com/pclens.htm

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Feb 20, 2016 20:24:40   #
Nightski
 
Nikonian72 wrote:
The OP of this thread mentioned Scheimflug in the title. If you do not understand this principle, then read what I posted above, and view the image of a TILTED front lens board. Shift is not mentioned.
You are right, Douglass. we are not understanding each other at all.

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Feb 20, 2016 21:44:51   #
LoneRangeFinder Loc: Left field
 
lightcatcher wrote:
Note in article it is shown in vertical format about half way down.
Using the 35mm Perspective Control lens http://www.uscoles.com/pclens.htm
I can't imagine many people doing panos today if one to splice the film together.

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Feb 20, 2016 22:09:51   #
lightcatcher Loc: Farmington, NM (4 corners)
 
LoneRangeFinder wrote:
I can't imagine many people doing panos today if one to splice the film together.
Use them on a DSLR.
Cheap Perspective Control lens/accessory for Nikon DSLR: http://photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00SEOK

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Feb 9, 2018 12:44:04   #
erickter Loc: Dallas,TX
 
Nikonian72 wrote:
Many panos are vertical images stitched together, where the tilt & shift functions are rendered moot on a DSLR. View cameras do not have this restriction.


I've shot panos with (35mm film and dslr) PC/tilt lenses for 4 decades - in verticle and horizontal format - Nikon and Canon. The T/S function is NOT moot when shooting panos. Rather, it can enhance my work by helping to keep more (desired) subject matter (top or bottom) in the frame, while keeping verticle building lines (or landscape edges) parallel to the view finder. The shift function IS often more useful than the tilt function in this situation, as another member surmised. Tilt primarily helps increase depth of field (in-focus subject matter) on single frame shots, but with skill, could be used for certain pano situations.
Shooting vertical with medium to normal focal length lenses and stitching in PP provides greater top/bottom coverage, more detail, and proper human perspective, compared to single super WA shots or massive horizontal panos. The shift feature on my Nikon, Canon, Ziess, (and a few excellent Russian shift lenses) almost always get used during pano shots..whether 2,3,4,5,6,7, or more frames.

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