Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
For Your Consideration
Shooting into the Sun - please share your knowledge and images
Page 1 of 15 next> last>>
Jan 5, 2016 08:07:00   #
Linda From Maine Loc: Yakima, Washington
 
This my favorite lighting for photography, so I’m looking forward to your joining in to share your photos, stories and tips!

A few points for consideration:

* Exposure issues: metering, fill flash, reflectors. What to do, if anything, about the sun’s brightest center
* Dealing with lens flare - embrace or avoid? Lens hood, polarizer
* Backlighting for translucent subject, impact of silhouettes
* How to create sun stars
* Composition: feature the sun, or hide it?
* Contre Jour” - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contre-jour
* Contre Jour - one of St3v3M’s weekly challenges:
http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/photo_contest.jsp?pcnum=69

Sun stars: you don’t always have to use a small aperture. In the image on left, the star effect was created by the position of the tree and leaves.
Sun stars: you don’t always have to use a small ap...
(Download)


(Download)


(Download)

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 09:03:32   #
Frank2013 Loc: San Antonio, TX. & Milwaukee, WI.
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
This my favorite lighting for photography
Stunning work Linda.

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 09:07:18   #
Linda From Maine Loc: Yakima, Washington
 
Frank2013 wrote:
Stunning work Linda.


Thank you, Frank! Do you have images you'd like to share? Is the sun your friend or foe in your interests and style of shooting?

Reply
 
 
Jan 5, 2016 09:12:28   #
neilds37 Loc: Port Angeles, WA
 
Very nice examples Linda.
Before going any further on this subject, I have heard there can be damage to the sensor from shooting directly into the sun, although I have done it. Any words of wisdom on this?

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 09:14:10   #
Linda From Maine Loc: Yakima, Washington
 
neilds37 wrote:
Very nice examples Linda.
Before going any further on this subject, I have heard there can be damage to the sensor from shooting directly into the sun, although I have done it. Any words of wisdom on this?


I read the same when I purchased my first dslr and was very careful. Then I started seeing photos with the sun featured prominently and decided to take a chance :)

Perhaps the technical folks can offer an opinion here. I did read that you can damage your point and shoot because while you're composing and exposing with a dslr, the mirror is keeping the sun from the sensor - but with a p&s the sun is striking it the entire time. And with an slr, the shorter the exposure time, the better...just to be safe.

Thanks, Neil!

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 09:15:37   #
Frank2013 Loc: San Antonio, TX. & Milwaukee, WI.
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
Thank you, Frank! Do you have images you'd like to share?
Not real sure but if I find anything worthy you know I'll share.
Linda From Maine wrote:
Is the sun your friend or foe in your interests and style of shooting?
The sun is light and light is shooting, it is up to you to prevent it from being your foe.

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 09:18:36   #
Linda From Maine Loc: Yakima, Washington
 
Frank2013 wrote:
The sun is light and light is shooting, it is up to you to prevent it from being your foe.


:thumbup:

Reply
 
 
Jan 5, 2016 09:34:08   #
burkphoto Loc: High Point, NC
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
I read the same when I purchased my first dslr and was very careful. Then I started seeing photos with the sun featured prominently and decided to take a chance :)

Perhaps the technical folks can offer an opinion here. I did read that you can damage your point and shoot because while you're composing and exposing with a dslr, the mirror is keeping the sun from the sensor - but with a p&s the sun is striking it the entire time. And with an slr, the shorter the exposure time, the better...just to be safe.

Thanks, Neil!
I read the same when I purchased my first dslr and... (show quote)


You'll be more likely to damage your EYES if using any type of optical viewfinder that views the image seen through the lens. Burning holes in your retina is not recommended!

Photographing into the sun is safest when using a mirrorless camera and an EVF or the LCD/LED/OLED display on the back of the camera. Just don't point it at the sun for a long time.

Use an 8X neutral density filter on the mirrorless. It will reduce the intensity of light falling on the sensor, allow use of wider, non-diffracting apertures, and lower your shutter speed.

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 09:36:54   #
Linda From Maine Loc: Yakima, Washington
 
burkphoto wrote:
.
Thanks so much for this terrific information, Bill!

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 10:03:47   #
neilds37 Loc: Port Angeles, WA
 
burkphoto wrote:
You'll be more likely to damage your EYES if using any type of optical viewfinder that views the image seen through the lens. Burning holes in your retina is not recommended!

Photographing into the sun is safest when using a mirrorless camera and an EVF or the LCD/LED/OLED display on the back of the camera. Just don't point it at the sun for a long time.

Use an 8X neutral density filter on the mirrorless. It will reduce the intensity of light falling on the sensor, allow use of wider, non-diffracting apertures, and lower your shutter speed.
You'll be more likely to damage your EYES if using... (show quote)


Thank you for the info. Would a CPL filter work also?

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 10:05:10   #
burkphoto Loc: High Point, NC
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
Thanks so much for this terrific information, Bill!


Unfortunately, all filters will add some flare to sun-in-scene photos. They'll do the same for star light or moon light at night, so I remove all filters for night time sky photography. But I'll use an ND, perhaps a CPL, and maybe a star filter during the day.

I should have mentioned that the quality of the 8X ND filter matters a lot. Multi-coated filters (B+W, Singh-Ray, etc.) will avoid flare the best.

Reply
 
 
Jan 5, 2016 10:09:01   #
burkphoto Loc: High Point, NC
 
neilds37 wrote:
Thank you for the info. Would a CPL filter work also?


Yes. It lowers intensity by up to a couple of stops. Unless you're working on an extreme wide angle lens, you can combine a CPL with a 4X ND filter, too.

Those of us who use m43 (Micro Four-Thirds) format and do video in daylight have known this trick for years. The ND filter allows shallower depth of field, and avoids using apertures smaller than f/8. On m43 gear, smaller apertures degrade image sharpness due to diffraction.

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 10:14:12   #
neilds37 Loc: Port Angeles, WA
 
Thank you Bill for putting the sensor problem to rest.

Now back to Linda's original subject...

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 10:15:32   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
Excellent work on all these, Linda. My personal taste gravitates toward hiding the sun, as you did in the last set. I find that one with the fingers "holding" the sun very interesting.

Reply
Jan 5, 2016 10:17:12   #
Linda From Maine Loc: Yakima, Washington
 
neilds37 wrote:
Now back to Linda's original subject...


It's all good, Neil - this is the kind of wide discussion I'd hoped would take place in this thread :thumbup:

Reply
Page 1 of 15 next> last>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
For Your Consideration
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2022 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.