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Get me out of "Auto"...please!
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Jul 30, 2014 21:25:06   #
amehta
 
fotohouse wrote:
My comment in no way was intended to diss those that shoot in auto. I at times shoot in P, A, S, or M depending on what I am trying to get. One should not expect to get the same results from auto modes as a skilled photographer can get in any mode. The camera only does what the photographer tells it to do, I choose to think for mine a bit more ;)

As far as a quality DSLR, even my older 6mp KM7D is still capable of taking stunning pictures provided I don't use high ISO's or at least not try to make large prints at high ISO's. I have fellow photog friends and we all use different equipment, literally every brand is in use in our club and many are using older tech. It is more about composition and knowing how to use a camera than the camera itself. And my recommendation on equipment would be more to the lens side of things than the camera body. Good glass always trumps bodies.
My comment in no way was intended to diss those th... (show quote)

I have trouble with absolutes like this. It really depends on the difference between the cameras and the lenses for which change will have a bigger effect.

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Jul 30, 2014 21:30:28   #
AndyCE
 
speters wrote:
It is all you, looks like you've gotten way lazy with your shooting style, you may need to take a different approach and tell yourself to not push the shutter, unless you thought about what it is you really like about what you're looking at and are about to take a picture of. Then you should take your time to think what would be the best approach to achieve what you see in your mind (best: step by step). Follow through with that and you'll start to "hate" >Auto< in no time! Don't be in a hurry, try to enjoy the time thinking about it and then doing it. Take your time!
It is all you, looks like you've gotten way lazy w... (show quote)


I'm not getting the lazy comments? How is she lazy? She posted a valid question, she wants to move from auto mode, how does that correlate to being lazy? I just moved to P mode, so have I been lazy for 3 months? Please someone help me understand here! :-)
Andy

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Jul 30, 2014 21:41:40   #
DavidPine
 
Welcome to the HOG GrandmaG. It gets much better. All the shooting modes have value. You'll find many photographers shoot in aperture mode for the most part. Join a camera club near you. Most camera club photographers like to help new people. Don't be afraid to "step out. Good luck.
GrandmaG wrote:
I've had the D5000 Nikon DSLR for several years and I still use mostly the automatic settings. It seems I'm always in a hurry to get pictures & don't (or can't) take my time with them. I have 3 lenses, 2 speedlights, and a polarized filter.

I mostly use the 18-55 mm 1:3.5-5.6G lens that came with the camera and my SB400 Speedlight. I use my 55-200mm 1:4-5.6G when on vacation. These 3 items, the filter, & the cords fit nicely in my small tamrac bag (plus the camera body, of course). The SB 900 speedlight and the 35mm 1:1.8G lens mostly stay in my other camera bag at home. I've only used them a few times. I love the quality of the pictures and the fact that there is no lag time, plus I can take a burst of photos to catch just the right expressions on my grand children's faces. I have played around with RAW photos a bit and edit some photos in Adobe PSE 8.0. I would love to learn how to use more of the features of my camera so I can take professional looking portraits and group shots.
I've had the D5000 Nikon DSLR for several years an... (show quote)

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Jul 30, 2014 23:24:42   #
lamiaceae (a regular here)
 
fotohouse wrote:
My comment in no way was intended to diss those that shoot in auto. I at times shoot in P, A, S, or M depending on what I am trying to get. One should not expect to get the same results from auto modes as a skilled photographer can get in any mode. The camera only does what the photographer tells it to do, I choose to think for mine a bit more ;)

As far as a quality DSLR, even my older 6mp KM7D is still capable of taking stunning pictures provided I don't use high ISO's or at least not try to make large prints at high ISO's. I have fellow photog friends and we all use different equipment, literally every brand is in use in our club and many are using older tech. It is more about composition and knowing how to use a camera than the camera itself. And my recommendation on equipment would be more to the lens side of things than the camera body. Good glass always trumps bodies.
My comment in no way was intended to diss those th... (show quote)


I fully agree! I have used both 6MP and 16MP. Both can capture an excellent image. It is the Photographer that counts, "having an eye." Composition, lighting, imagination, experience, knowledge, skill, and perhaps talent. I've seen great photographs by talented beginners using a $150 Point-N-Shoot and junk (worded mildly) taken by posers with $7,000 high end DSLRs. In fact in most cases I can't tell what camera was used to capture an image. All I know is do I like it or not. Though sometimes really bad cameras and lenses reveal themselves.

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Jul 31, 2014 01:23:59   #
Jackinthebox
 
GrandmaG wrote:
My head IS spinning a little but there is so much good advice here! Now that I am mostly retired, I can experiment with my camera. I am posting a few pictures but please don't laugh!


They are good, good, good and good.

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Jul 31, 2014 01:57:52   #
GrandmaG
 
Db7423 wrote:
First, welcome to the Hog, GrandmaG. Only thre basic things to understand when you are out of auto and in full manual mode: aperature, shutter speed and ISO. Getting a grip on how they work together to get a well exposed photo isn't hard once you understand these three and what they do and how they relate one to the others. A book that will make this easy to understand is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. This book is an easy to read and well illustrated. About $20 at Barnes and Noble and Amazon. Get it and unlock the mystery. ;)
First, welcome to the Hog, GrandmaG. Only thre ba... (show quote)


I ordered this book & also a book named 'Mastering the Nikon 5000" by Darrell Young.

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Jul 31, 2014 02:03:26   #
GrandmaG
 
Mogul wrote:
By the way, GrandmaG, congratulations on on of the best thread titles I've seen in a while. I'm serious; it sure beats a thread titled, "HELP!"......


Thank you...I wanted to be specific, and I'm getting a lot of very good advice!

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Jul 31, 2014 02:18:24   #
GrandmaG
 
Erv wrote:
HI GG! What Jerry said and also, go out and get a light meter to help you figure out lighting. They are pretty easy to use. Just point it at what you want to take and then set up the camera. They are the mainstay of the old days. And work great to get you in the ball park for your Grand kid shots.:):)
Erv


My grandfather was into photography & I remember he used a light meter. Also it took him forever to compose the shot. But he did some impressive portraits of me & my family & also developed them himself!

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Jul 31, 2014 02:28:22   #
GrandmaG
 
[quote=RWR][quote=Nightsky]And it should be noted that your in-camera light meter measures only reflected light ...
Quote:


What do you think you get with an Expodisc on the lens?


What is an Expodisc?

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Jul 31, 2014 02:37:26   #
GrandmaG
 
dpullum wrote:
c in the closet at home.

The thing mostly missed in beginning photography is not the mysticism of the iso, speed, f stop... rather, the prime need is to see, compose. Composition tool always with you is your hands... learn to make 8x10 crop in your visual fields... move around giving various possible photos and framing....Suggestion, we read from lower left to upper right, and there should be limited major elements in your photo... perhaps 3 max. AND take many photos... you have 1200 per roll of electronic film (SD) vs the old 12, 24, 36 shots with 35 film. Good luck in learning composition and enjoy shooting.
c in the closet at home. br br The thing mostly m... (show quote)


I'm getting better at framing pictures, but at a fast-paced birthday party, the background is usually a mess. That's when I turn to PSE and blur it all out. One time I even blurred out my grand daughter's boyfriend after he broke up with her!

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Jul 31, 2014 03:17:53   #
Jackinthebox
 
GrandmaG wrote:
I'm getting better at framing pictures, but at a fast-paced birthday party, the background is usually a mess. That's when I turn to PSE and blur it all out. One time I even blurred out my grand daughter's boyfriend after he broke up with her!


I had a need for that at one time. I wanted to blur him out of the state.

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Jul 31, 2014 03:24:23   #
GrandmaG
 
Sandie wrote:
There is a GREAT teacher out there named Mike Milicia who teaches all of this( I am not related but did take a course with him) and find he seems to be able to explain this in a way people understand and he also does photo trips so.... could be a fun way of learning. Just saying.

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Jul 31, 2014 03:29:55   #
GrandmaG
 
Sandie wrote:
There is a GREAT teacher out there named Mike Milicia who teaches all of this (I am not related but did take a course with him) and find he seems to be able to explain this in a way people understand and he also does photo trips so.... could be a fun way of learning. Just saying.


Where does Mike teach? Does he have classes or teach online?

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Jul 31, 2014 03:35:48   #
Jackinthebox
 
AndyCE wrote:
I'm not getting the lazy comments? How is she lazy? She posted a valid question, she wants to move from auto mode, how does that correlate to being lazy? I just moved to P mode, so have I been lazy for 3 months? Please someone help me understand here! :-)
Andy


It is not you at all Andy. The smuck that called it lazy is just a d*c*he*ad.
You Andy are doing just fine and she posted a good question as indicated by 5 pages of commends.

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Jul 31, 2014 04:34:49   #
RWR
 
GrandmaG wrote:
What is an Expodisc?


http://www.expoimaging.com/product-overview.php?cat_id=1

It's a diffuser that screws into the filter thread on your lens, and allows you to measure the light falling on your subject (incident reading), rather than the light reflecting from your subject (reflection reading), as is normal with your in-camera meter. It may also be used for setting your white balance, which I think is its most useful function since modern in-camera through-the-lens (TTL) meters are so accurate that (in my opinion) incident readings are superfluous. Others will disagree with this last statement.
Thanks for asking, and good luck with your photography. Looks like you're doing mighty fine so far. :)

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