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Moon shots 1 26 12
Jan 27, 2012 16:42:28   #
jdeanb Loc: Texas / central
 
Taken with a Tamron SP Di LD IF200 -500mm 1:5-6.3
#1 1.0 sec exp F6.3 ISO250 focal length 500 =782
#2 all same except 2.0 sec exp
My question ? is the shadow a reflection on the lens. At a faster shutter is it not visible unless I turn light up high with Picasa.
All are as shot.
Question 2 ? what setting would have worked better
Canon 7d camera

Just after sunset 1
Just after sunset  1...

Just after sunset 2
Just after sunset  2...

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Jan 27, 2012 17:58:26   #
Erv Loc: Medina Ohio
 
Hi jdeanb, You are way over exposing these. You have to think of the moon as being lighted by the sun. Here are a few from last month I think.
First one was taken in the evening before the sun set.
ISO-200, SS-1/640,F16 EV-3 Nikon 28-300
The second one was at night
ISO-200, SS-1/500. F11, EV-2 Nikon 300 2,8 1.4TC

Forgot to add if you hit the down load button you can veiw a bigger picture.
Erv


jdeanb wrote:
Taken with a Tamron SP Di LD IF200 -500mm 1:5-6.3
#1 1.0 sec exp F6.3 ISO250 focal length 500 =782
#2 all same except 2.0 sec exp
My question ? is the shadow a reflection on the lens. At a faster shutter is it not visible unless I turn light up high with Picasa.
All are as shot.
Question 2 ? what setting would have worked better
Canon 7d camera





Reply
Jan 27, 2012 19:39:18   #
jdeanb Loc: Texas / central
 
Erv wrote:
Hi jdeanb, You are way over exposing these. You have to think of the moon as being lighted by the sun. Here are a few from last month I think.
First one was taken in the evening before the sun set.
ISO-200, SS-1/640,F16 EV-3 Nikon 28-300
The second one was at night
ISO-200, SS-1/500. F11, EV-2 Nikon 300 2,8 1.4TC

Forgot to add if you hit the down load button you can veiw a bigger picture.
Erv


jdeanb wrote:
Taken with a Tamron SP Di LD IF200 -500mm 1:5-6.3
#1 1.0 sec exp F6.3 ISO250 focal length 500 =782
#2 all same except 2.0 sec exp
My question ? is the shadow a reflection on the lens. At a faster shutter is it not visible unless I turn light up high with Picasa.
All are as shot.
Question 2 ? what setting would have worked better
Canon 7d camera
Hi jdeanb, You are way over exposing these. You ha... (show quote)

yes They are over exposed but what I was wanting was exposed to where you can see the dark part of the moon also . I took several shots with setting simular to the setting that you suggested and I got was just the lighted part.. Are there a way to achive this without over exposing the lighted part. I thank you for the info. And for stopping and looking thanks !

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Jan 27, 2012 20:42:33   #
Erv Loc: Medina Ohio
 
That is going to be a tough one. If you can get a shoot as early as you can with a little of of the Sun going down, maybe. I have never tried that. If the sky is clear tomorrow I might just try it. But i don't think you can over power the Sun hitting it. You might try a ND filter if you have one.
Erv

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Jan 27, 2012 21:07:36   #
gmcase Loc: Galt's Gulch
 
This link probably has everything you could ever want to know about shooting the moon (the one up in the sky, not your britches!)

http://www.calphoto.com/moon.htm

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Jan 27, 2012 21:41:36   #
jdeanb Loc: Texas / central
 
First I want to thank you for your help. Just love this site as there are so many people that wants to help guys like me. was into film cameras years ago with an Canon AE 1. then was in business so had no time for photos. Now here I am 30 years later with digital and I love it but after 30 years the old brain has forgot a lot of the old. Like teaching old dog a new trick. But have learned many things just by reading on this site. If you try to get the dark of the moon please post your results . Thanks again ! James

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Jan 28, 2012 10:52:49   #
BuckeyeBilly Loc: St. Petersburg, FL
 
jdeanb,
You could set your 7D on either "P," "Tv," or "Av" and follow the manual for Exposure Compensation or Bracketing, on pages 104 and 105. Then look to see the settings chosen by the camera.
I'm like you....I like to see the bright side of the moon but to also see the whole outline with its dark side just simply adds an awesome mysterious wonder to it all!
I'm just now getting into photography and only have a Canon SX40 superzoom bridge camera. Here are a couple of moon shots I took using it....and there is no post-processing done and the camera was hand-held.

5 pm at Fort DeSoto, near St. Petersburg FL
5 pm at Fort DeSoto, near St. Petersburg FL...

Taken from my backyard, St. Petersburg FL
Taken from my backyard, St. Petersburg FL...

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Jan 28, 2012 11:05:50   #
sudzmonn Loc: here , there , everywhere
 
don't forget that when the moon is up during the day it is possible to "play" and get some pictures then also . Maybe not as good detail but still you can play .

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Jan 28, 2012 11:37:21   #
jdeanb Loc: Texas / central
 
BuckeyeBilly wrote:
jdeanb,
You could set your 7D on either "P," "Tv," or "Av" and follow the manual for Exposure Compensation or Bracketing, on pages 104 and 105. Then look to see the settings chosen by the camera.
I'm like you....I like to see the bright side of the moon but to also see the whole outline with its dark side just simply adds an awesome mysterious wonder to it all!
I'm just now getting into photography and only have a Canon SX40 superzoom bridge camera. Here are a couple of moon shots I took using it....and there is no post-processing done and the camera was hand-held.
jdeanb, br You could set your 7D on either "P... (show quote)


Nice shots but what I am wanting is to show the dark part also. Think it would add a great dimension. Just like a new prospective to a old model that has been shot millions time all about the same. Thank you for your input food for thought.

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Jan 28, 2012 12:25:45   #
Clyde Loc: Born in Ks
 
THANKS FOR THE INFO, I"VE TROUBLE ALSO

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Jan 28, 2012 15:14:30   #
BuckeyeBilly Loc: St. Petersburg, FL
 
The reason I mentioned using your "auto" modes and bracketing is so that you can see what over- and under- exposing the shots would take. This is what might allow the full circle (dark side) of the moon to show up. As it is, your photos are very close to getting what you want so just keep trying the settings, going up and down by one or two stops until you get it.

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Jan 28, 2012 16:53:12   #
jdeanb Loc: Texas / central
 
Thank you and yes you are right. I can get the dark side but not without blowing out the lighted side. Did some research and found that it suggested a .5 to 1 second shudder speed . I think I tried all type of shudder speed from 1/6 up to 6 sec. I started getting what I want about 1.5 sec but then the lighted side is blown out. Another problem is that over 1 sec there is enough movement of the moon that the movement shows up also. Going to play some more and if you find a way would appreciate knowing what you find. Again Thanks

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Jan 28, 2012 16:56:17   #
pfredd
 
The bright crescent of moon reflected sunlight is far brighter than the shadowed part — the eye can just barely differentiate, the camera can not. So, the answer to your question is, no there is no setting to capture both.
However, from a tripod make several exposures (manual, not auto) slow to capture shadowed moonscape and faster for the bright. Then use HDR processing if you have it, if not overlay the best of both and use the eraser tool of the overexposed one. Such editing can be done faster than I can tell you.

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Jan 29, 2012 16:53:41   #
YocoYur Loc: Slovenia
 
Shoot 26.01.2012 handheld in full manual mode with Canon SX220HS-14x zoom + 2x DTC:

ISO 400 f5.6 1/100
ISO 400       f5.6       1/100...

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Jan 29, 2012 20:30:09   #
Clyde Loc: Born in Ks
 
very nice, do not miss Venus this coming June

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