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How can I tell which lens is better?
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May 3, 2014 07:12:32   #
Brandmic Loc: Alabama
 
Birthday pics shot with the AF-S 35mm / 1.8g lens





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May 3, 2014 09:56:52   #
Mark7829 Loc: Calfornia
 
You really have to do research and look to DxO Labs paying attention to weather proofing, autofocus, vignetting, distortion, lens coatings to reduce flare, sharpness, bokeh, weight. bass vs plastic, warranty, resale value, and compatibility with the camera and lenses, filters, mounts, controls, vibration reduction, locking for drift, internal vs external zoom, etc., etc.

Do all this and you will make the right choice.

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May 3, 2014 10:20:11   #
RKL349 Loc: Connecticut
 
wingnut1956 wrote:
Very informative...thank you..I'm pretty decided on the 50mm 1.8 af-s Nikor for the first one...will let you all know how it works out...thanks everybody!


I have this lens for my D7000. Bought it on the recommendation of some on UHH? Great prime lens, to say the least. :thumbup:

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May 3, 2014 10:39:34   #
CatMarley Loc: North Carolina
 
wingnut1956 wrote:
I'm looking for a prime lens..still stuck between the 35 & 50mms. I like shooting landscapes and occasionally portraits. I want to get the blur in the background, not sure which to get,


No single lens will be optimal for landscapes and portraits. the optimal portrait lens is 80 - 100mm eq. The best landscape lens is in the 20 to 35 mm range. For blurring the background, a fast lens you can use wide open is what will give you the smallest depth of focus. Most lens manufacturers 35 and 50 mm lenses are sharp and are in the range of F1.4 to 2.8, and are relatively inexpensive. But if having just one lens to do all, a short zoom is probably best, and to get the best one of those will take some research, because there is a lot of variation out there.

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May 3, 2014 11:08:46   #
Bill Emmett Loc: Bow, New Hampshire
 
Back to basics. What you are trying to accomplish is a portrait with a shallow depth of field. Use any lens that is considered "fast". Open the lens all the way, to like f2.8, and shoot your subject with a colorful background. When you lens focuses on the subject it will blur the background. Note the circles of color that may show up, if they are very "round" you have a good lens, if not and seem to be a little more octagon, you have a lens with maybe 7-8 leaves on the aperture. For best bokah, use a fast lens wide open, with at least 9 petals on the aperture. That lens will give you a more round hole exposing the sensor.

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May 3, 2014 11:21:13   #
Brandmic Loc: Alabama
 
Petals on the apeture? Is this the no of Diaphragm Blades?

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May 3, 2014 12:06:48   #
Jamers Loc: Michigan
 
50MM is not a portrait lens, compare the 85MM 1.8 better for portraits, all in all 70-200 2.8 (if you have the room) in my opinion would be my first choice. This is a subjective decision, perhaps rent or borrow various lens and and determine your favorite.

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May 3, 2014 12:12:13   #
Brandmic Loc: Alabama
 
The 50mm is 75mm on crop sensor. It seems to do good for what I use it for; pics of grandkids. I sometimes use my 55-200 zoom on 85-100mm as well.

I've read or heard that macro lens are good for portraits. True?

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May 3, 2014 14:33:44   #
Reinaldokool Loc: San Rafael, CA
 
Flyfishn wrote:
I like the 35/1.8 DX great all around lens. Good Luck


Me too. I bought a 50 first and found I rarely used it. I gave it away to my professional photog daughter and bought a 35/1.8 which I actually use.

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May 3, 2014 15:58:52   #
amehta Loc: Boston
 
Brandmic wrote:
The 50mm is 75mm on crop sensor. It seems to do good for what I use it for; pics of grandkids. I sometimes use my 55-200 zoom on 85-100mm as well.

I've read or heard that macro lens are good for portraits. True?

Yes, macro lenses can work quite well for portraits.

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May 3, 2014 16:12:22   #
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May 3, 2014 17:21:46   #
Mark7829 Loc: Calfornia
 
amehta wrote:
Yes, macro lenses can work quite well for portraits.


The biggest photographic disadvantage to using macro lenses for portraiture is their maximum aperture. While there are many portrait lenses available with apertures of f/1.4 to f/2.5, there are only a few macro lenses available with apertures larger than f/2.8. If you prefer shooting wide open to give maximum separation of your subject from the background, or your portraiture style is journalistic or uses available light, macro lenses may not be right for you.

You must have precise focus with a macro lens, so it is always best to use a tripod or camera stand. Many of the latest macro lenses incorporate image stabilization now, and this is a real advantage if you have to hand-hold the camera for a portrait or you're not using flash as your main light. If you aren't using TTL metering, remember to correct your exposure as you move closer: increase exposure by one EV step at half life size and two EV steps at 1:1.

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May 3, 2014 17:32:47   #
Brandmic Loc: Alabama
 
That would never work for me. Besides I don't do portraits in the traditional sense. Mine are recording the lives of my grandchildren and family and doing the 6mo and 12mo photos of my grandchildren for my daughter and husband. In use the 35mm/1.8g and 50mm/1.4g on a d7100 and they work great. Would like a macro lens later on for macro purposes. Besides having to wear reading glasses, manual focus is difficult for me. I really depend on the AF of the camera.

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May 3, 2014 18:17:50   #
SteveR Loc: Dallas
 
Your camera has a motor in it for focusing the lens, so there is not reason to pay for a lens with a motor in it. For example, The 50mm f1.8D lens, which is rated as one of Nikon's best, can be puchased for about $120. The f1.8G, however, which has the motor in the lens runs nearle $200 more. Go for the D. Some will suggest going with the f1.4, for dof purposes, but the f1.8 should be adequate. With the crop sensor camera, the 50mm will give you the angle of view of a 75mm lens. If you want something more like a 1:1 view, which would mean you could get family gatherings in at the dinner table, go with the 35mm. I do suggest purchasing fx lenses. Some day you may decide to go fx. Also, you use the sweet, center portion of the fx lens when shooting on your dx camera.

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May 3, 2014 18:32:44   #
Brandmic Loc: Alabama
 
I had the 35mm lens with my d5100 so I had to have one with a motor in it. I also got the 50mm/1.4 for $350 due to a pricing error by amazon. It's supposed to be $469 and is now. Was hard to turn down a good deal. I agree with the fx lens. All my lens had to have motors bc I just purchased the
d7100 but don't have to now.

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