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Chromatic aberration
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Jan 7, 2012 03:26:53   #
tainkc Loc: Kansas City
 
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at this point. The birds were about 3/8ths of a mile away. I am up on a bluff looking down slightly. Shooting with a Sony a580 using their low end 70-300mm lens. Maxed out at full zoom. F 6.3 @ 1/400sec. ISO 100. Fine jpeg. AWB.

What you see here in both photos is after I started out in Lightroom 3. I tried to reduce the chromatic aberration using the sliders. I did reduce it maybe a little. By the way, I have the same problem when shooting in RAW using this lens. I do use the hood.

I then slammed it over to cs5 , enlarged it to what you see here, cropped it and then ran a high pass filter at #2 and then saved it. (both photos) This did not help nor make it worse.

When it was regular size, the birds were much smaller and you could not see the c/a. But it doesn't matter. I have tried to find the sweet spot on numerous occasions. And it does not matter if I am zoomed out all the way or not. I always have some or a lot of c/a.

I am not worried about the focus too much since I was shooting through a chain link fence. At normal viewing everything appears nice and sharp. Remember, I blew these up quite a bit.

What, if anything can I do while shooting before post processing to reduce or eliminate this problem on this lens?

#1
#1...

#2
#2...

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Jan 7, 2012 09:41:37   #
photogrl57 Loc: Tennessee
 
tainkc wrote:
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at this point. The birds were about 3/8ths of a mile away. I am up on a bluff looking down slightly. Shooting with a Sony a580 using their low end 70-300mm lens. Maxed out at full zoom. F 6.3 @ 1/400sec. ISO 100. Fine jpeg. AWB.

What you see here in both photos is after I started out in Lightroom 3. I tried to reduce the chromatic aberration using the sliders. I did reduce it maybe a little. By the way, I have the same problem when shooting in RAW using this lens. I do use the hood.

I then slammed it over to cs5 , enlarged it to what you see here, cropped it and then ran a high pass filter at #2 and then saved it. (both photos) This did not help nor make it worse.

When it was regular size, the birds were much smaller and you could not see the c/a. But it doesn't matter. I have tried to find the sweet spot on numerous occasions. And it does not matter if I am zoomed out all the way or not. I always have some or a lot of c/a.

I am not worried about the focus too much since I was shooting through a chain link fence. At normal viewing everything appears nice and sharp. Remember, I blew these up quite a bit.

What, if anything can I do while shooting before post processing to reduce or eliminate this problem on this lens?
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at... (show quote)


One of the first things I do when viewing a photo in cs5 is check the histogram
image menu/adjustments/levels
You can see in this snapshot of mine that the histogram is way off which means your white balance is way off
It would be useless to adjust this particular photo with this now because of the pp already done on it would make it look fake ...



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Jan 7, 2012 09:46:53   #
photogrl57 Loc: Tennessee
 
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :)
Most cameras allow you to view the histogram of photos in camera which will allow you to adjust the wb for your next photo under the same conditions.
However when you run into this and want to correct it in photoshop ... look at the histogram ... you can see all the color is in the midtones ... nothing on the dark side (left) or the light side (right).
If you slide the arrows just below it over to where they meet the black part of the histogram it will bring everything back into the correct exposure .. the center arrow is for the midtones ... I rarely have to adjust that .. only if after fixing the outside .. if its too light or too dark I might slide the midtones a bit until it looks right to me ...
Then after adjusting the histogram if you need it sharpened still I'd do the high pass filter thing.

Reply
 
 
Jan 7, 2012 10:43:26   #
docrob Loc: Durango, Colorado
 
tainkc wrote:
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at this point. The birds were about 3/8ths of a mile away. I am up on a bluff looking down slightly. Shooting with a Sony a580 using their low end 70-300mm lens. Maxed out at full zoom. F 6.3 @ 1/400sec. ISO 100. Fine jpeg. AWB.

What you see here in both photos is after I started out in Lightroom 3. I tried to reduce the chromatic aberration using the sliders. I did reduce it maybe a little. By the way, I have the same problem when shooting in RAW using this lens. I do use the hood.

I then slammed it over to cs5 , enlarged it to what you see here, cropped it and then ran a high pass filter at #2 and then saved it. (both photos) This did not help nor make it worse.

When it was regular size, the birds were much smaller and you could not see the c/a. But it doesn't matter. I have tried to find the sweet spot on numerous occasions. And it does not matter if I am zoomed out all the way or not. I always have some or a lot of c/a.

I am not worried about the focus too much since I was shooting through a chain link fence. At normal viewing everything appears nice and sharp. Remember, I blew these up quite a bit.

What, if anything can I do while shooting before post processing to reduce or eliminate this problem on this lens?
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at... (show quote)


Nice job describing what you did - very informative - and, I think, how images in this gallery are supposed to be presented. I had to look up chromatic abberation to figure out what you are talking about. I did and it didn't help much. So I gotta ask why is it you seem so concerned about a lens based condition that virtually no one you show your images too will see?

Reply
Jan 7, 2012 10:45:15   #
tainkc Loc: Kansas City
 
photogrl57 wrote:
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :)
Most cameras allow you to view the histogram of photos in camera which will allow you to adjust the wb for your next photo under the same conditions.
However when you run into this and want to correct it in photoshop ... look at the histogram ... you can see all the color is in the midtones ... nothing on the dark side (left) or the light side (right).
If you slide the arrows just below it over to where they meet the black part of the histogram it will bring everything back into the correct exposure .. the center arrow is for the midtones ... I rarely have to adjust that .. only if after fixing the outside .. if its too light or too dark I might slide the midtones a bit until it looks right to me ...
Then after adjusting the histogram if you need it sharpened still I'd do the high pass filter thing.
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :) br Mos... (show quote)
Thanks. I too look at the histogram in lightroom, which is where I begin my pp. On a bright day such as this, it is easy to be off on the bright side. I use the recovery slider to bring things more in line. But you gave me a thought. What if I set the ev levels higher in the camera to begin with since this is where the problem originates? In the original photograph, the whites weren't blown out. Pretty close though. I store all of the originals untouched so I can go back and try what you suggested. Thanks for your input. What is cool is I know I can bug you if I do have problems I can not solve in cs5. Lol.

Reply
Jan 7, 2012 10:47:43   #
photogrl57 Loc: Tennessee
 
tainkc wrote:
photogrl57 wrote:
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :)
Most cameras allow you to view the histogram of photos in camera which will allow you to adjust the wb for your next photo under the same conditions.
However when you run into this and want to correct it in photoshop ... look at the histogram ... you can see all the color is in the midtones ... nothing on the dark side (left) or the light side (right).
If you slide the arrows just below it over to where they meet the black part of the histogram it will bring everything back into the correct exposure .. the center arrow is for the midtones ... I rarely have to adjust that .. only if after fixing the outside .. if its too light or too dark I might slide the midtones a bit until it looks right to me ...
Then after adjusting the histogram if you need it sharpened still I'd do the high pass filter thing.
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :) br Mos... (show quote)
Thanks. I too look at the histogram in lightroom, which is where I begin my pp. On a bright day such as this, it is easy to be off on the bright side. I use the recovery slider to bring things more in line. But you gave me a thought. What if I set the ev levels higher in the camera to begin with since this is where the problem originates? In the original photograph, the whites weren't blown out. Pretty close though. I store all of the originals untouched so I can go back and try what you suggested. Thanks for your input. What is cool is I know I can bug you if I do have problems I can not solve in cs5. Lol.
quote=photogrl57 Sorry had to finish my train of ... (show quote)


Absolutely hun I'd be happy to help in cs5 ... it's my favorite editing software out of all of them.

Reply
Jan 7, 2012 11:01:18   #
docrob Loc: Durango, Colorado
 
tainkc wrote:
photogrl57 wrote:
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :)
Most cameras allow you to view the histogram of photos in camera which will allow you to adjust the wb for your next photo under the same conditions.
However when you run into this and want to correct it in photoshop ... look at the histogram ... you can see all the color is in the midtones ... nothing on the dark side (left) or the light side (right).
If you slide the arrows just below it over to where they meet the black part of the histogram it will bring everything back into the correct exposure .. the center arrow is for the midtones ... I rarely have to adjust that .. only if after fixing the outside .. if its too light or too dark I might slide the midtones a bit until it looks right to me ...
Then after adjusting the histogram if you need it sharpened still I'd do the high pass filter thing.
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :) br Mos... (show quote)
Thanks. I too look at the histogram in lightroom, which is where I begin my pp. On a bright day such as this, it is easy to be off on the bright side. I use the recovery slider to bring things more in line. But you gave me a thought. What if I set the ev levels higher in the camera to begin with since this is where the problem originates? In the original photograph, the whites weren't blown out. Pretty close though. I store all of the originals untouched so I can go back and try what you suggested. Thanks for your input. What is cool is I know I can bug you if I do have problems I can not solve in cs5. Lol.
quote=photogrl57 Sorry had to finish my train of ... (show quote)


now i am really confused. Silly me i thought you were asking about chromatic abberation which occurs when the lens focuses light waves differently - now i discover this is really about the histogram and exposure???

Reply
 
 
Jan 7, 2012 11:03:37   #
photogrl57 Loc: Tennessee
 
No LOL sorry for the confusion ... I was explaining how it might be adjusted post processing ... if this problem occurred and you couldn't get it adjusted in camera ....

Reply
Jan 7, 2012 12:07:54   #
tainkc Loc: Kansas City
 
docrob wrote:
tainkc wrote:
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at this point. The birds were about 3/8ths of a mile away. I am up on a bluff looking down slightly. Shooting with a Sony a580 using their low end 70-300mm lens. Maxed out at full zoom. F 6.3 @ 1/400sec. ISO 100. Fine jpeg. AWB.

What you see here in both photos is after I started out in Lightroom 3. I tried to reduce the chromatic aberration using the sliders. I did reduce it maybe a little. By the way, I have the same problem when shooting in RAW using this lens. I do use the hood.

I then slammed it over to cs5 , enlarged it to what you see here, cropped it and then ran a high pass filter at #2 and then saved it. (both photos) This did not help nor make it worse.

When it was regular size, the birds were much smaller and you could not see the c/a. But it doesn't matter. I have tried to find the sweet spot on numerous occasions. And it does not matter if I am zoomed out all the way or not. I always have some or a lot of c/a.

I am not worried about the focus too much since I was shooting through a chain link fence. At normal viewing everything appears nice and sharp. Remember, I blew these up quite a bit.

What, if anything can I do while shooting before post processing to reduce or eliminate this problem on this lens?
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at... (show quote)


Nice job describing what you did - very informative - and, I think, how images in this gallery are supposed to be presented. I had to look up chromatic abberation to figure out what you are talking about. I did and it didn't help much. So I gotta ask why is it you seem so concerned about a lens based condition that virtually no one you show your images too will see?
quote=tainkc The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny.... (show quote)


I should probably find a better example of what I am talking about. This condition is quite annoying.

Reply
Jan 7, 2012 12:09:56   #
tainkc Loc: Kansas City
 
photogrl57 wrote:
No LOL sorry for the confusion ... I was explaining how it might be adjusted post processing ... if this problem occurred and you couldn't get it adjusted in camera ....
No. you did good. If this is a problem that I have to live with until I get some better glass, than anything, including pp will help.

Reply
Jan 7, 2012 12:12:40   #
tainkc Loc: Kansas City
 
docrob wrote:
tainkc wrote:
photogrl57 wrote:
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :)
Most cameras allow you to view the histogram of photos in camera which will allow you to adjust the wb for your next photo under the same conditions.
However when you run into this and want to correct it in photoshop ... look at the histogram ... you can see all the color is in the midtones ... nothing on the dark side (left) or the light side (right).
If you slide the arrows just below it over to where they meet the black part of the histogram it will bring everything back into the correct exposure .. the center arrow is for the midtones ... I rarely have to adjust that .. only if after fixing the outside .. if its too light or too dark I might slide the midtones a bit until it looks right to me ...
Then after adjusting the histogram if you need it sharpened still I'd do the high pass filter thing.
Sorry had to finish my train of thought :) br Mos... (show quote)
Thanks. I too look at the histogram in lightroom, which is where I begin my pp. On a bright day such as this, it is easy to be off on the bright side. I use the recovery slider to bring things more in line. But you gave me a thought. What if I set the ev levels higher in the camera to begin with since this is where the problem originates? In the original photograph, the whites weren't blown out. Pretty close though. I store all of the originals untouched so I can go back and try what you suggested. Thanks for your input. What is cool is I know I can bug you if I do have problems I can not solve in cs5. Lol.
quote=photogrl57 Sorry had to finish my train of ... (show quote)


now i am really confused. Silly me i thought you were asking about chromatic abberation which occurs when the lens focuses light waves differently - now i discover this is really about the histogram and exposure???
quote=tainkc quote=photogrl57 Sorry had to finis... (show quote)
You are o.k.. I AM talking about a problem with the lens. It is just being suggested how I may try to correct this in post processing.

Reply
 
 
Jan 7, 2012 12:42:11   #
docrob Loc: Durango, Colorado
 
ok

Reply
Jan 8, 2012 08:50:39   #
ephraim Imperio
 
tainkc wrote:
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at this point. The birds were about 3/8ths of a mile away. I am up on a bluff looking down slightly. Shooting with a Sony a580 using their low end 70-300mm lens. Maxed out at full zoom. F 6.3 @ 1/400sec. ISO 100. Fine jpeg. AWB.

What you see here in both photos is after I started out in Lightroom 3. I tried to reduce the chromatic aberration using the sliders. I did reduce it maybe a little. By the way, I have the same problem when shooting in RAW using this lens. I do use the hood.

I then slammed it over to cs5 , enlarged it to what you see here, cropped it and then ran a high pass filter at #2 and then saved it. (both photos) This did not help nor make it worse.

When it was regular size, the birds were much smaller and you could not see the c/a. But it doesn't matter. I have tried to find the sweet spot on numerous occasions. And it does not matter if I am zoomed out all the way or not. I always have some or a lot of c/a.

I am not worried about the focus too much since I was shooting through a chain link fence. At normal viewing everything appears nice and sharp. Remember, I blew these up quite a bit.

What, if anything can I do while shooting before post processing to reduce or eliminate this problem on this lens?
The set up: Friday, 1pm cst. Sunny. No clouds at... (show quote)


This lens is supposed to handle chromatic aberration very well with the ED lens component according to reviews.



Reply
Jan 8, 2012 09:50:46   #
Ragarm
 
tainkc wrote:

When it was regular size, the birds were much smaller and you could not see the c/a. But it doesn't matter. I have tried to find the sweet spot on numerous occasions. And it does not matter if I am zoomed out all the way or not. I always have some or a lot of c/a.

I am not worried about the focus too much since I was shooting through a chain link fence. At normal viewing everything appears nice and sharp. Remember, I blew these up quite a bit.

What, if anything can I do while shooting before post processing to reduce or eliminate this problem on this lens?
br When it was regular size, the birds were muc... (show quote)


What makes you think you are dealing with c/a? Even when I blow up your images super large, to the point where I'm looking at square pixels, I see only a little evidence of color fringing. Check out the example of c/a at http://toothwalker.org/optics/chromatic.html to see what c/a would look like.

What we have here, in your photos, is artifacts caused by digital processing. You will have it regardless of the lens. Try it. Pick a scene that contains a few sharp, high contrast edges. Shoot it with a couple lenses. Blow up the images drastically and you'll find the edges fringed like this case you present. This effect will not be lens dependent.

However, you might see color, especially purple, fringing in images from some lenses, and that will vary from lens to lens. That is c/a.

You've got a nice lens there.

Reply
Jan 8, 2012 10:04:55   #
Ragarm
 
Also, I notice your images are in JPEG. All compression algorithms will produce artifacts that become visible at extreme magnification. JPEG will produce artifacts even when converted at its highest quality setting.

My suggestion to you would be to take a couple images and camera to a friendly, knowledgeable, and cooperative local camera store. Explain what you are concerned about. Maybe they will shoot some test photos for you using your camera and the best lens they have. Then you can process those test images to see if you still have these artifacts. Then if you still see it, it's not the lens.

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