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Sunset and post Process
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Jan 2, 2012 21:49:41   #
Going Digital Loc: MidWestern IL (Near StL)
 
Here's a before and after. Canon T3i. Auto setting. 1/60 f5.6 ISO 125. Looking for did rights and did wrongs. Criticism welcome, that's how I'll learn. I'd like to maintain a little more lighting in the foreground, but intensifying the sky destroyed it. Using Canon DPP for post process. Any suggestions?

As shot
As shot...

Processed
Processed...

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Jan 3, 2012 00:18:36   #
Danilo Loc: Las Vegas
 
I really like this shot, Mr. Digital! I like the crop on the processed picture, but I agree it would be nice to have some detail in foreground buildings.
This is an ideal situation for HDR. But, you know what? I might see more detail in the foreground and then decide I like it better the way it is! I guess it would be nice to be able to choose.
Good job, thanks for sharing!

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Jan 3, 2012 05:59:30   #
cwilliams31 Loc: Salisbury, North Carolina
 
Here's one I did yesterday. Only had about three minutes to take the shot.

Before
Before...

After
After...

Reply
 
 
Jan 3, 2012 07:08:11   #
russelray Loc: La Mesa CA
 
I don't like Canon's DPP software. I work in Lightroom and PaintShop Pro X4 mostly.

If you want more detail in the foreground, take your picture to Lightroom and use the "Fill light" function. It's awesome.

If you don't have Lightroom, you can download a free, fully functional, 30-day trial at the Adobe website.

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Jan 3, 2012 07:09:32   #
Erv Loc: Medina Ohio
 
Hi GD
Did a quick one on it, getting ready to go to work :(. I just upped the contrast a little and raised the low tonal's a lot. I will talk with ya later tonight.
Erv



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Jan 3, 2012 07:15:16   #
gwong1 Loc: Tampa, FL
 
I agree having some foreground makes it more interesting. Here is one I did at Siesta Key Beach, voted #1 beach in America this year.
Going Digital wrote:
Here's a before and after. Canon T3i. Auto setting. 1/60 f5.6 ISO 125. Looking for did rights and did wrongs. Criticism welcome, that's how I'll learn. I'd like to maintain a little more lighting in the foreground, but intensifying the sky destroyed it. Using Canon DPP for post process. Any suggestions?

Before
Before...

After
After...

Reply
Jan 3, 2012 07:27:39   #
Going Digital Loc: MidWestern IL (Near StL)
 
Raised the brightness and contrast a little, saturation a lot, tone a little. Quite a bit more realistic. That's what I was going for. Found that raising saturation darkened foreground severely, increasing brightness a little brought it back without killing the sky. Have to learn a technique? Or maybe it's more just "play with it" until you get what you want.



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Jan 3, 2012 07:48:51   #
gwong1 Loc: Tampa, FL
 
Looks great. I am learning as well.
Going Digital wrote:
Raised the brightness and contrast a little, saturation a lot, tone a little. Quite a bit more realistic. That's what I was going for. Found that raising saturation darkened foreground severely, increasing brightness a little brought it back without killing the sky. Have to learn a technique? Or maybe it's more just "play with it" until you get what you want.

Reply
Jan 3, 2012 08:00:17   #
Roger Hicks Loc: Aquitaine
 
Either a fill light or a graduated filter, or both, can be useful in pictures like these. Both are available, under various names, in various programs. Fill light simply amplifies the signal in the dark area more, bringing the risk of colour shifts and noise, and is better suited to slight under-exposure ('exposing for the sky') whereas a graduated filter darkens the sky and is more suited to a more generously exposed image (exposing for the foreground').

Cheers,

R.

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Jan 3, 2012 08:04:25   #
abc1234 Loc: Elk Grove Village, Illinois
 
I prefer a more conventional approach. That is, mask off the foreground so you can manipulate the sky and foreground separately. The hitch is all that detail. Here is a handy tutorial for making that complicated mask.

http://iskills-media.s3.amazonaws.com/photoshopcs5beg-demo/1303.mp4" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.infiniteskills.com/demos/movie-player.php?h=685&w=890&movie=http://iskills-media.s3.amazonaws.com/photoshopcs5beg-demo/1303.mp4

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Jan 3, 2012 08:26:44   #
cwilliams31 Loc: Salisbury, North Carolina
 
I did mine to bring out the color's in the sky and used the forground as a silhouette . I meant for it to be that way ....

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Jan 3, 2012 10:31:53   #
docrob Loc: Durango, Colorado
 
Going Digital wrote:
Here's a before and after. Canon T3i. Auto setting. 1/60 f5.6 ISO 125. Looking for did rights and did wrongs. Criticism welcome, that's how I'll learn. I'd like to maintain a little more lighting in the foreground, but intensifying the sky destroyed it. Using Canon DPP for post process. Any suggestions?


Ok here is a thought: You want more light in the foreground. You are shooting a back lit scene; the sky (the sunset) is going to be blown out no matter what - so why not simply meter for the foreground (realizing it reads middle grey) and open up 1 stop or 1/2 or 1 & 1/2 or 2 stops....

In other words, think about the conditions and what, if anything you might do? Then do it and have fun!

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Jan 3, 2012 10:42:07   #
senad55verizon.net Loc: Milford, NJ
 
"As shot" is a just picure of a farm in it's quiet winter phase. The silos suggest cattle, but they're all gone. The basic composition is strong, with the eye following naturally from bare trees on the near left, through the pole bartn and silos, to infinite distance on the far right. Good start.

"Processed" nicely emphasizes the lonely, depressing quiet of the winter scene. The dark lowering clouds and the grim outlines and shadows of the barn and silos contrast with the bright glowing horizon, which reminds that there's a brighter future just ahead. The receding composition strongly supports that basic feeling.

Most importantly, you didn't overdo it. Good work!!

What's next? Your DPP software has limitations. You might consider a current copy of Photoshop Elements or even PS 6.5. If so, prepare yourself for a lifetime of learning digital image processing. For some of us, that's a source of never-ending delight.

Tip: sometimes it helps to put down in words what you're trying to accomplish on the screen.

Good luck!

Peter

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Jan 3, 2012 14:44:59   #
coco1964 Loc: Winsted Mn
 
I'll give it a shot---don't know if it's any different but foreground appears more visable on my screen.......



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Jan 3, 2012 18:27:51   #
Scubie Loc: Brunswick Georgia
 
Wonderful, would look great over my fireplace....you are so talented..

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