Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Photographing Private Airplanes
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Dec 24, 2011 06:51:12   #
Dblunt76 Loc: Richmond, VA
 
I recently visited a small municipal (public) airport and was taking pictures of small planes parked on the ramp. Through a fence I may add. The airport manager approached me and asked me to stop shooting. I do know that you can enter the aircraft's tail number and Google will provide various registration/ownership information. It was no big deal and I did not want to start an argument so I stopped shooting. Was the guy out of bounds and I should have just ignored him?

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Dec 24, 2011 07:04:35   #
janik Loc: Rochester, NY
 
I imagine even at a small airport, security is nervous about anything going on with anyone near fences since 9/11. You did the right thing just walking away.

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Dec 24, 2011 07:05:52   #
Roger Hicks Loc: Aquitaine
 
Well, I'd certainly have asked him why he asked you to stop. Were you on public land when you were shooting?

Cheers,

R.

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Dec 24, 2011 07:39:27   #
snowbear
 
Janik is correct: sometimes it is best to just walk away. It might be worth contacting them, explain what you want to do (photos for a calendar, portfolio, etc.) and ask for permission for a future shoot.

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Dec 24, 2011 08:07:06   #
rocco_7155 Loc: Connecticut/Louisiana
 
The fact that he approached you himself and didnt call authorities or Law Enforcement implies that it was a private property/privacy issue rather than a strict security issue. I've spent some time around these guys and they are hired to protect pilots property. There are more private plane thefts than you might imagine.

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Dec 24, 2011 08:14:32   #
rpavich Loc: West Virginia
 
The issue is that if you were on public property then he was in the wrong.
Contrary too public opinion public photography isn't a crime. Many (even cops) try to bully photogs into giving up their rights.


Be polite and stand your ground...explain the law to him.

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Dec 24, 2011 08:29:06   #
Roger Hicks Loc: Aquitaine
 
rpavich wrote:
The issue is that if you were on public property then he was in the wrong.
Contrary too public opinion public photography isn't a crime. Many (even cops) try to bully photogs into giving up their rights.


Be polite and stand your ground...explain the law to him.


Absolutely true, but a lot depends on how badly you want the photo, how much time you want to waste, etc. There are times when I will do exactly as you say, not least (again as you say) to remind people of the law; but there are also times when it's not worth the grief, if I'm not that interested in the picture anyway.

That's why I said I'd have asked him politely why he was objecting.

Cheers,

R.

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Dec 24, 2011 08:34:09   #
rpavich Loc: West Virginia
 
Roger Hicks wrote:
rpavich wrote:
The issue is that if you were on public property then he was in the wrong.
Contrary too public opinion public photography isn't a crime. Many (even cops) try to bully photogs into giving up their rights.


Be polite and stand your ground...explain the law to him.


Absolutely true, but a lot depends on how badly you want the photo, how much time you want to waste, etc. There are times when I will do exactly as you say, not least (again as you say) to remind people of the law; but there are also times when it's not worth the grief, if I'm not that interested in the picture anyway.

That's why I said I'd have asked him politely why he was objecting.

Cheers,

R.
quote=rpavich The issue is that if you were on pu... (show quote)


Very true..

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Dec 24, 2011 09:12:29   #
Terry Scott Reed Loc: Reading, PA
 
He was wrong to ask, but you were right to comply and "live to shoot another day." (assuming you were on public land)
Regarding thefts, and terrorism in general, are there any proven links or stats that show a connection between photography and criminal or terroristic acts out there? I don't know of any. I'm not a crook, probably don't think like one, either, but I don't think I'd see any merit in a photo of a plane I intended to steal. What could I possibly learn? Regarding tail number, if I'm stealing it, what do I care who owns it, and couldn't I just write the number down, and attract a lot less attention? Educate a niave one, UHH-ers!

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Dec 25, 2011 02:00:29   #
dirtpusher Loc: tulsa oklahoma
 
Dblunt76 wrote:
I recently visited a small municipal (public) airport and was taking pictures of small planes parked on the ramp. Through a fence I may add. The airport manager approached me and asked me to stop shooting. I do know that you can enter the aircraft's tail number and Google will provide various registration/ownership information. It was no big deal and I did not want to start an argument so I stopped shooting. Was the guy out of bounds and I should have just ignored him?


planes are stolen an every so often we get notices when they are. never know what people are upto

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Dec 25, 2011 02:19:03   #
dirtpusher Loc: tulsa oklahoma
 
Terry Scott Reed wrote:
He was wrong to ask, but you were right to comply and "live to shoot another day." (assuming you were on public land)
Regarding thefts, and terrorism in general, are there any proven links or stats that show a connection between photography and criminal or terroristic acts out there? I don't know of any. I'm not a crook, probably don't think like one, either, but I don't think I'd see any merit in a photo of a plane I intended to steal. What could I possibly learn? Regarding tail number, if I'm stealing it, what do I care who owns it, and couldn't I just write the number down, and attract a lot less attention? Educate a niave one, UHH-ers!
He was wrong to ask, but you were right to comply ... (show quote)


what he should have done was gone to the fob an asked permission we run people off all time that dont have that respect. people steal parts there all kinds of reasons now days wasn't like that back in the 60's 70's an 80's parts wind up on ebay but the thieves dont realize each part has a staped number on them an each part put on a plane has to be recorded in that planes log book. each log book stays with that plane till it if ever it gets scraped. thats how we catch the ebay thieves.one guy we busted had several photographs on computer an print telling where those planes are. we run anbody off we have doughts about. cut an dried. what would you do if some guy drove up to youre house started takin pictures. if you ask thats a different story an you explain what youre wanting to do bet you ask him who he is an lil more about him. parts of airports are public an parts are not. terry to say he was wrong i agree to disagree with that statement. airport are being paid to protect thier coustomers property. if you be stupid with him we will do all we can to have way more information about that person than he will want us to know. airports are goverened by the f.a.a. thats... FEDERAL... aviation aminastration. feds can wind up on youre door stoop if we mark it suspecious.

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Dec 25, 2011 05:12:54   #
Sam55
 
Dblunt76 wrote:
I recently visited a small municipal (public) airport and was taking pictures of small planes parked on the ramp. Through a fence I may add. The airport manager approached me and asked me to stop shooting. I do know that you can enter the aircraft's tail number and Google will provide various registration/ownership information. It was no big deal and I did not want to start an argument so I stopped shooting. Was the guy out of bounds and I should have just ignored him?


I have been to the local airport several times with my camera. The first thing that i did however was to go inside and ask if i would be allowed to take some pictures of some of the aircraft that were parked there. A couple were of particular interest to me. Not only was I told yes, they allowed me to go out through the doors onto the asphalt and I did not have to fight the fence and bushes to get a good shot!

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Dec 25, 2011 05:58:13   #
Cappy Loc: Wildwood, NJ
 
Sam55 wrote:
Dblunt76 wrote:
I recently visited a small municipal (public) airport and was taking pictures of small planes parked on the ramp. Through a fence I may add. The airport manager approached me and asked me to stop shooting. I do know that you can enter the aircraft's tail number and Google will provide various registration/ownership information. It was no big deal and I did not want to start an argument so I stopped shooting. Was the guy out of bounds and I should have just ignored him?


I have been to the local airport several times with my camera. The first thing that i did however was to go inside and ask if i would be allowed to take some pictures of some of the aircraft that were parked there. A couple were of particular interest to me. Not only was I told yes, they allowed me to go out through the doors onto the asphalt and I did not have to fight the fence and bushes to get a good shot!
quote=Dblunt76 I recently visited a small municip... (show quote)


Sam, I believe you handled it the best of all the responses.
George

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Dec 25, 2011 07:06:59   #
FrankKello
 
If you are standing on public proerty, you can take pictues of whatever you can see. However, if you are on airport property, the owner or manager has a right to make you stop. Also, when taking pictures you can not climb up on a ladder to take pics of something on the other side of a solid fence as you would be violating expected privacy rights. If the fence is a chain link fence that you can see through from a public spot, you can take pics of what is on the other side of that fence as there is no expectation of privacy. If you are going to be in an area for some time such as the airport, it would be best to let someone know ahead of time what you want to do. Take into consideration how you would feel if someone was standing on the sidewalk taking pics of your house and car . You would most likely want to know what was going on.

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Dec 25, 2011 08:01:46   #
usaellie101 Loc: Spring Hill, Florida
 
Explain the law to him and he was most likely to grab that camera and smash you and your camera to the ground. Be careful when confronting objections. Being photographed is a real high emotional issue and people who say stop taking pictures generally mean it. The right place and person to EXPLAIN the law to that guy is in a courtroom. Good Luck . Otherwise it's a big world. Find something else to shoot.


rpavich wrote:
The issue is that if you were on public property then he was in the wrong.
Contrary too public opinion public photography isn't a crime. Many (even cops) try to bully photogs into giving up their rights.


Be polite and stand your ground...explain the law to him.

| Reply
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