Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Why Shoot RAW?
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 next>>
Jul 16, 2013 17:33:57   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
I screwed up. Here are two images, each made from the initial RAW file. There I was, sitting, looking out the window, when I saw an H3 helicopter heading toward Sky Harbor Airport. This was back in March of 2010. I had not had my digital camera for all that long and had mostly photographed in P mode. The camera was set to Manual, as I was working on moving away from the auto settings.

I neglected to remember the mode setting and in my haste to grab a photo of this military helicopter flying overhead, I just grabbed the camera, headed out the door, pointed and shot. Of course, you can imagine my disappointment when I viewed the file. Sticking to my practice of never deleting any image, it was archived.

The first image is a straight out of the camera image. The second was what I could recover and crop in Adobe Bridge. There was enough image data in the RAW file to be able to get an OK image from a horrible mistake. I don't believe a jpg original image would have been usable. This should help some of you folks who are vacillating between RAW and JPG formats.
The unedited image
The unedited image...
The edited image
The edited image...

| Reply
Jul 16, 2013 17:40:10   #
Wahawk
 
Shooting in "P" mode would have Prevented the Problem, cuz the "P" mode stands for Professional Pictures!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

| Reply
Jul 16, 2013 17:48:23   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
Wahawk wrote:
Shooting in "P" mode would have Prevented the Problem, cuz the "P" mode stands for Professional Pictures!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


I nose dat.
8-)

| Reply
Jul 16, 2013 17:48:52   #
JPL
 
Most people never do any mistakes when taking pics!

One of the advantages with RAW (that is not possible in Professional Pictures mode) is that you can benefit from deliberately adjust for "mistake" pics. F.x. when you need higher shutter speeds than your lens and light allows, the camera meter says you should select 1/100 when you want 1/500, then you just select your 1/500 and fix the dark pic in post processing.

This is of course not possible without some sacrifice. You get more noise and maybe some other minor problems in the pic. But in certain circumstances this can be a good way to extend your possibilities for a good picture.

| Reply
Jul 17, 2013 00:50:28   #
St3v3M
 
Thank you!

| Reply
Jul 17, 2013 06:40:57   #
Dlevon
 
rmalarz wrote:
I screwed up. Here are two images, each made from the initial RAW file. There I was, sitting, looking out the window, when I saw an H3 helicopter heading toward Sky Harbor Airport. This was back in March of 2010. I had not had my digital camera for all that long and had mostly photographed in P mode. The camera was set to Manual, as I was working on moving away from the auto settings.

I neglected to remember the mode setting and in my haste to grab a photo of this military helicopter flying overhead, I just grabbed the camera, headed out the door, pointed and shot. Of course, you can imagine my disappointment when I viewed the file. Sticking to my practice of never deleting any image, it was archived.

The first image is a straight out of the camera image. The second was what I could recover and crop in Adobe Bridge. There was enough image data in the RAW file to be able to get an OK image from a horrible mistake. I don't believe a jpg original image would have been usable. This should help some of you folks who are vacillating between RAW and JPG formats.
I screwed up. Here are two images, each made from ... (show quote)


Shouldn't screw up in the first place! However your point is well taken.

| Reply
Jul 17, 2013 08:13:36   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
Dlevon wrote:
Shouldn't screw up in the first place! However your point is well taken.


This is quite true. However, we all do at some time.

The fact that RAW vs. JPG has surfaced so many times here led me to think this might be a useful visual presentation for the benefits of using RAW format.
--Bob

| Reply
Jul 17, 2013 08:37:50   #
ncshutterbug
 
Excellent example! It is very difficult for me to save most photos with so much overblown white. You did a beautiful job!

| Reply
Jul 17, 2013 08:44:27   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
ncshutterbug wrote:
Excellent example! It is very difficult for me to save most photos with so much overblown white. You did a beautiful job!


Thanks for the compliment. With all of the discussion on this topic, I thought an example would be, as they say, worth a 1000 words.
--Bob

| Reply
Oct 11, 2013 05:22:07   #
georgevedwards
 
A good example. Also gives evidence to those who have been recommending overexposing digital photographs as opposed to underexposed. (I thing the theory is that there is more info on the light side of the exposure spectrum that on the dark side) I do find it hard to understand why you did not blow out any highlights with that extremely light photo; possible it had a small aperture opening just too slow of a shutter speed? Why did it overexpose in the first place? A high ISO? Just a really bright day? But the movement has been frozen well for a moving object...do you still have the data on the settings?
rmalarz wrote:
I screwed up. Here are two images, each made from the initial RAW file. There I was, sitting, looking out the window, when I saw an H3 helicopter heading toward Sky Harbor Airport. This was back in March of 2010. I had not had my digital camera for all that long and had mostly photographed in P mode. The camera was set to Manual, as I was working on moving away from the auto settings.

I neglected to remember the mode setting and in my haste to grab a photo of this military helicopter flying overhead, I just grabbed the camera, headed out the door, pointed and shot. Of course, you can imagine my disappointment when I viewed the file. Sticking to my practice of never deleting any image, it was archived.

The first image is a straight out of the camera image. The second was what I could recover and crop in Adobe Bridge. There was enough image data in the RAW file to be able to get an OK image from a horrible mistake. I don't believe a jpg original image would have been usable. This should help some of you folks who are vacillating between RAW and JPG formats.
I screwed up. Here are two images, each made from ... (show quote)

| Reply
Oct 11, 2013 06:52:56   #
nairiam
 
ncshutterbug wrote:
Excellent example! It is very difficult for me to save most photos with so much overblown white. You did a beautiful job!


Armalarz
The above says it all. Thanks for showing.

| Reply
Oct 11, 2013 07:57:09   #
lbrandt79
 
I have this argument regularly with friends. If you get the exposure right from the 'get go' I think raw is an incredible waste of time. I use it very sparingly.

| Reply
Oct 11, 2013 08:02:07   #
lambern3
 
Well I learned something today, thank you all.

| Reply
Oct 11, 2013 11:00:45   #
napabob (a regular here)
 
the difference is you buy your bread already baked, or you get the dough and bake it yourself, I prefer baking it my self. And it could be a waste of time if you are only into snapshots, thats fine for some but if you want control of the whole process, shooting in manual & RAW is the answer.

| Reply
Oct 11, 2013 11:58:29   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
napabob wrote:
the difference is you buy your bread already baked, or you get the dough and bake it yourself, I prefer baking it my self. And it could be a waste of time if you are only into snapshots, thats fine for some but if you want control of the whole process, shooting in manual & RAW is the answer.


:thumbup:

| Reply
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 next>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2019 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.