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Posts for: cfbudd
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Mar 27, 2017 14:10:50   #
cfbudd wrote:
I think the 2nd one is cool without any resizing or repositioning of anything.


Oh, and why? Because it states your business. The first one does nothing for you.
 
Mar 27, 2017 14:08:51   #
toptrainer wrote:
I had a pro create a logo for me, which one do you like, and why? and would you change anything in it.


I think the 2nd one is cool without any resizing or repositioning of anything.
Mar 27, 2017 13:55:47   #
Dave Craig wrote:
Here is my dilemma I just purchased a studio light/flash and I can’t get it to wok correctly with my camera I have a 5d mark ll setup with a cannon 70-200 2.8 IS L USM lens when I hook to my remote trigger the camera says the flash power is off yet it will flash when I shoot, I only have the control over the flash on the studio light itself The studio light and trigger manual say it will work on a 5d ll. so what am I doing wrong, I’m stumped! And yes I'm a newbie.


If you don't want the flash to fire, you have to turn the trigger off. The camera has no idea what's going on with the trigger.
Mar 24, 2017 22:44:30   #
repleo wrote:
Another reason to go mirrorless !!!


Huh??
Mar 24, 2017 16:00:44   #
John Gerlach wrote:
What I said in the book years ago is likely true. I do believe most photographers probably prefer aperture-priority (perhaps as they do today), and so did Barbar back then. I tried it years ago when I first went to digital in 2003, but the problems it created were so serious I soon abandoned it. And I have rarely used it for any reason since. Prior to 2003, I only used manual with film, so I did not find out how often light in the viewfinder caused underexposure. I avoided that problem accidently by just using manual exposure with film, but digital made the pitfalls readily evident. So back to manual, especially for landscapes for many reasons. If you don't think you have a light through the viewfinder problem with your system, try this test. Put the camera on any auto mode and a polarizer over the lens. Point the camera at a dark area in the shade, but arrange the camera so sun can shine into the uncovered viewfinder. Look at the auto exposure that is set by the camera. Now cover the viewfinder with your hand or close the curtain. If there is a difference, that is the problem. If the unblocked viewfinder says 1/8 second at f/16, and the covered viewfinder says 1/30 at f/16, that means the image will be seriously too dark with auto exposure due to ambient passing into the viewfinder.
What I said in the book years ago is likely true. ... (show quote)


I'm lost. What has light in the viewfinder and the problems it caused you to do with using aperture-priority exposure? And how does manual exposure then solve your problem by preventing light from entering the viewfinder?
Mar 24, 2017 15:01:03   #
John Gerlach wrote:
Hi Hogs,

I am about to begin the second revision of my landscape photography book by Focal Press.? Exposure and metering are important skills to master. Over 40 years of photographing close-ups, wildlife. and countless landscapes for fun and to earn a living, I have never found a situation where aperture-priority works better than the other choices I prefer that include shutter-priority, manual, shutter-priority and Auto ISO, or just manually setting a known exposure for stuff too small to meter like stars. Can any one think of a situation where aperture-priority really works best in case it should be in the updated book. I never have found a reason to use aperture-priority, but that doesn't mean there aren't any! Thanks for considering this question.
Hi Hogs, br br I am about to begin the second rev... (show quote)


"-so aperture priority is often used by landscape photographers.", page 65 of the original Focal Press book by John and Barbara Gerlach on the subject of landscape photography, "Digital Landscape Photography".
 
Mar 24, 2017 14:42:08   #
John Gerlach wrote:
Hi Hogs,

I am about to begin the second revision of my landscape photography book by Focal Press.? Exposure and metering are important skills to master. Over 40 years of photographing close-ups, wildlife. and countless landscapes for fun and to earn a living, I have never found a situation where aperture-priority works better than the other choices I prefer that include shutter-priority, manual, shutter-priority and Auto ISO, or just manually setting a known exposure for stuff too small to meter like stars. Can any one think of a situation where aperture-priority really works best in case it should be in the updated book. I never have found a reason to use aperture-priority, but that doesn't mean there aren't any! Thanks for considering this question.
Hi Hogs, br br I am about to begin the second rev... (show quote)


This is all a gigantic spoof! And we UHH'ers have wasted 10 pages so far. Refer to your own writing, John. "Aperture-priority-is probably the most widely used exposure mode of serious photographers.", and "Barbara prefers Aperture-priority-", page 62 of your and Barbara's book, "Digital Wildlife Photography", Focal Press, 2013.
Mar 24, 2017 14:16:37   #
John Gerlach wrote:
I do pans and HDR and focus stacking/in-camera HDR combos, and HDR alone. I just select the aperture I want and to keep the same, and manually adjust the shutter to get to the same result as using aperture-priority. I don't have much luck with in-camera autobracketing because the camera shoots the series of images too fast, causing less sharp images due to shutter bounce.
Mar 24, 2017 14:12:11   #
John Gerlach wrote:
I do pans and HDR and focus stacking/in-camera HDR combos, and HDR alone. I just select the aperture I want and to keep the same, and manually adjust the shutter to get to the same result as using aperture-priority. I don't have much luck with in-camera autobracketing because the camera shoots the series of images too fast, causing less sharp images due to shutter bounce.


OMG! How insane! That's what 'mirror up' and 'shutter delay' are for. Surely Canon's have those features.
Mar 15, 2017 15:33:29   #
MtnMan wrote:
Many of us with SLRs used color slide film.

We have thousands of slides waiting to be scanned someday.


Thanks for the reminder! There goes my vacation.
Mar 15, 2017 15:30:19   #
Be sure to shoot RAW.
 
Mar 14, 2017 10:14:15   #
Greenbean wrote:
Hi..............My name is Bill. After living most of my adult life in the beautiful Adirondack Mountains in up state NY, I now live in the flat lands of Florida. My dad was a professional photographer during the 1930's and 40's so I did sort of grow up in a studio. Back then it was strictly black and white and the only editing tool was the skill of the photographer. I have enjoyed taking pictures over the years but now am planning some photo safaris around the state. I love nature so tend to spend most of my energy attempting to capture mother nature at her best. Thanks for allowing me this opportunity to join your group!
Hi..............My name is Bill. After living most... (show quote)


Welcome! Always nice to have a youngster join us.
Mar 11, 2017 13:26:01   #
cfbudd wrote:
The cardinal seems not to be in focus. If you look at the railing, it seems it is in focus not on the same plane as the cardinal's eye. This might be a fine-tuning problem, and I suggest that you check the focus of your 5300 with this lens. (I assume the 5300 has fine-tune capability.)

Also, 1/80 is way way to slow to expect sharp images. VR can help camera movement but not subject movement. I have this lens and I consider it to be tack sharp.


PS: I checked the focus point, and it is behind the cardinal's eye on the back of his head.
Mar 11, 2017 13:21:43   #
The cardinal seems not to be in focus. If you look at the railing, it seems it is in focus not on the same plane as the cardinal's eye. This might be a fine-tuning problem, and I suggest that you check the focus of your 5300 with this lens. (I assume the 5300 has fine-tune capability.)

Also, 1/80 is way way to slow to expect sharp images. VR can help camera movement but not subject movement. I have this lens and I consider it to be tack sharp.
Mar 6, 2017 10:47:00   #
Pc45 wrote:
The Owens Valley, from Lone Pine and the Alabama Hills all the way to north of Bishop is a photographers dream. Between the geologic wonders of the Sierras and the White Inyos and the valley in between coupled with the meteorological wonders this topography creates, it just don't get any better.


It's 'Sierra', not 'Sierras '. My pet peeve!
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