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Photo Gallery
Day 316 - Daily Challenge - "Unique Veterans Day" - 11-11-2012
If you would like to post a reply, then please login (if you already have an account) or register (if you don't).
Page: <<prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 21 next>>
Nov 11, 2012 13:58:11   #
Roadrunner (a regular here)
 
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
Roadrunner wrote:
JFan.........Thank you very much for hosting today, thank you for serving....

Jim

USN 1955 - 1963


Well I didn't get half way down page one without a tear! Thank you RR and Subroto for your elequence and accompanying pictures.

My hero - my dad. Ran away to sea from a small Scottish hamlet at 15 years of age and spent six years in the Merchant Navy on the North Atlantic Run. Torpedo'd twice and once spent 10 days in a half submerged life raft. That's all I know, most "Vets" don't like to talk much, although I did get to hear of more than one memorable bar room brawl! He probably still holds the record today for the youngest person to obtain his Master's Ticket at 24 yrs old. He became a Trinity House Pilot and maintained his crowning pinnacle was piloting the Tall Ship - The Danmark - out of Falmouth harbour under full sail in 1966 - this picture was taken on board. Sadly he lost his life just short of 50, trying to board a crippled ferry with hundreds of people on board in storm force conditions. The second picture shows the pilot cutter the L.K.Mitchell so named in his honour, which is still in active service in Falmouth today 38yrs after he was killed and is regarded by all that use her services as safe, solid and inordinately dependable:0)

I have a picture somewhere of my son at three years of age at the helm of a boat in 1998 at the start of another Tall Ships race from Falmouth. The pilot cutter is on the horizon coming towards us - wheels within wheels and the inexorable circle of life!
quote=Roadrunner JFan.........Thank you very much... (show quote)


That is quite a testimony and really touching.
 
Nov 11, 2012 14:06:31   #
SheenaghGebhard
 
Roadrunner wrote:
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
Roadrunner wrote:
JFan.........Thank you very much for hosting today, thank you for serving....

Jim

USN 1955 - 1963


Well I didn't get half way down page one without a tear! Thank you RR and Subroto for your elequence and accompanying pictures.

My hero - my dad. Ran away to sea from a small Scottish hamlet at 15 years of age and spent six years in the Merchant Navy on the North Atlantic Run. Torpedo'd twice and once spent 10 days in a half submerged life raft. That's all I know, most "Vets" don't like to talk much, although I did get to hear of more than one memorable bar room brawl! He probably still holds the record today for the youngest person to obtain his Master's Ticket at 24 yrs old. He became a Trinity House Pilot and maintained his crowning pinnacle was piloting the Tall Ship - The Danmark - out of Falmouth harbour under full sail in 1966 - this picture was taken on board. Sadly he lost his life just short of 50, trying to board a crippled ferry with hundreds of people on board in storm force conditions. The second picture shows the pilot cutter the L.K.Mitchell so named in his honour, which is still in active service in Falmouth today 38yrs after he was killed and is regarded by all that use her services as safe, solid and inordinately dependable:0)

I have a picture somewhere of my son at three years of age at the helm of a boat in 1998 at the start of another Tall Ships race from Falmouth. The pilot cutter is on the horizon coming towards us - wheels within wheels and the inexorable circle of life!
quote=Roadrunner JFan.........Thank you very much... (show quote)


That is quite a testimony and really touching.
quote=SheenaghGebhard quote=Roadrunner JFan........ (show quote)


Thank you - as is there a camaradarie amongst thieves, so is there amongst sailors - he was not on duty that day, but chose to go ahead of others.....there was another selfless individual who dived into mountainous seas to try to save him - I'm glad he had the kindness of human contact before slipping over the edge:0)
Nov 11, 2012 14:26:04   #
PAToGraphy (a regular here)
 
jfantasma wrote:
Hello everyone and sorry for the late link. I spent half the day today taking photos for today's challenge. I took more than 300 pictures.

Today is a very special day for us. A day we can take out to say thank you to the individuals that are risking their lives to protect our freedom. Of course I didn't have to tell you that but I wantd to point out a few things I have noticed.

A "Veteran" doesn't necessarily mean someone who has been at war. Of course anytime people in general talk about this subject war is usually the topic that comes up. There are many individuals that serve in the military that will not see war, but that does not mean that hey arenot serving their country. Every job in the military is important... Whether a soldier sits behind a desk or is out rolling around in the mud. That soldier that has the so called "coosh job" has a lot of responsibilities as well. It is this person's responsibility to ensure that those soldier's on the front lines are getting paid, medical records are straight, promotion records are straight, life insurance policies are correct.... I think you get the point I am trying to make. I probably would have been wrapped up in that bunch of people that talked about those soldiers... saying they weren't really "soldiers" in those jobs. If it was not for me getting injured during my lst mission, I would have never learned to appreciate them. I turned into one of them pencil pushers at the end of my career because my injuries prevented me from doing my assigned job. Please consider this when posting your photos today.

OKAY... So I was thinking for today it can kind of be a free for all with one exception.... It MUST pertain to Veterans Day. You can post photos of a person you know who is or was a veteran. It can be a memorial for veterans. Remember therer are also veteran police and firefighters too so lets not forget them too. They protect our homefront. I would like to see something unique from your town that honors these veterans.

The last thing is HAVE FUN!!!
Hello everyone and sorry for the late link. I spen... (show quote)


p1 Fantastic start and wonderful narrative to get started.
Nov 11, 2012 14:27:13   #
PAToGraphy (a regular here)
 
modest genius wrote:
already posted elsewhere under 11.11.11.


p1 Have never seen anything like "Hello Goodbye" What a capture!
Nov 11, 2012 14:28:35   #
PAToGraphy (a regular here)
 
Roadrunner wrote:
JFan.........Thank you very much for hosting today, thank you for serving....

Jim

USN 1955 - 1963


p1 Thanks, RR, for serving.
Nov 11, 2012 14:31:54   #
PAToGraphy (a regular here)
 
subroto mukerji wrote:
I seen jfan's amazing pics, I seen the Roadrunner's wonderful photographs, I seen modest's memorial photos (last one was superb, modest) --- but there are millions here who've been fighting a war they know they can't win, generation after generation. Ever fought a war you know you'll never win, Double R ?? It can make the strongest turn to jelly.
Yet, for hundreds of years, the once-richest nation in the world has been systematically stripped of her uncountable wealth by a succession of foreign invaders, who've left in their wake some of the poorest and yet some of the noblest veterans of this unholy war.
This post is therefore a tribute to these veterans -- survivors of an unending battle against poverty, aided and abetted by a succession of governments that mouth platitudes, skim the cream and leave the poor toiling in the mud.
I seen jfan's amazing pics, I seen the Roadrunner'... (show quote)


p1. So important to be reminded of wars like this that continue in so many places around the globe. Thank you for this post. And still, this woman who has little compared to what I enjoy, managed a bit of a smile. Shame on me for the times I complain.
 
Nov 11, 2012 14:36:35   #
PAToGraphy (a regular here)
 
RiverNan wrote:
jfantasma how is it possible that i cannot find the words to convey what I am feeling. I so do appreciate what our soldiers and veterans sacrafice to protect this great land of the free. Yet I hate everything that forces this need.
Oh what will it take to find peace among all the brothers and sisters. Thank you Jfantasma and all the others for the services you provide.


p2 Nan, I so much agree. I keep thinking about Rodney King's simple but profound statement, "Why can't we all just get along?" Why not? Maybe the answer lies in "selfish greed" - of individuals and nations. I don't know, but I know I don't like it and would be very happy never to see a flag draped coffin again or see the terror on the face of someone living with PTSD because "they served and, therefore, saw and/or had to act".
Nov 11, 2012 14:39:26   #
PAToGraphy (a regular here)
 
SheenaghGebhard wrote:
Roadrunner wrote:
JFan.........Thank you very much for hosting today, thank you for serving....

Jim

USN 1955 - 1963


Well I didn't get half way down page one without a tear! Thank you RR and Subroto for your elequence and accompanying pictures.

My hero - my dad. Ran away to sea from a small Scottish hamlet at 15 years of age and spent six years in the Merchant Navy on the North Atlantic Run. Torpedo'd twice and once spent 10 days in a half submerged life raft. That's all I know, most "Vets" don't like to talk much, although I did get to hear of more than one memorable bar room brawl! He probably still holds the record today for the youngest person to obtain his Master's Ticket at 24 yrs old. He became a Trinity House Pilot and maintained his crowning pinnacle was piloting the Tall Ship - The Danmark - out of Falmouth harbour under full sail in 1966 - this picture was taken on board. Sadly he lost his life just short of 50, trying to board a crippled ferry with hundreds of people on board in storm force conditions. The second picture shows the pilot cutter the L.K.Mitchell so named in his honour, which is still in active service in Falmouth today 38yrs after he was killed and is regarded by all that use her services as safe, solid and inordinately dependable:0)

I have a picture somewhere of my son at three years of age at the helm of a boat in 1998 at the start of another Tall Ships race from Falmouth. The pilot cutter is on the horizon coming towards us - wheels within wheels and the inexorable circle of life!
quote=Roadrunner JFan.........Thank you very much... (show quote)


Sheenagh, what a beautiful story. Dad looks like a young Prince Philip. What a splendid cutter!
Nov 11, 2012 14:55:57   #
PAToGraphy (a regular here)
 
I do not have a long heritage of Veterans in my family. My paternal grandfather served in WW! in the Royal Canadian Army. My father was exempted as his brother enlisted in WWII and at the time, one son could be left to care for the family (that was what I was told). That would have been my Dad. My uncle had never married and was young (early 20s). He had saved all the $ he had made in a few years as an administrative secretary to Fischer (of the Fischer Body Company in Detroit, MI) No one knew what Uncle Bill had done - enlisting, saving his money. On the day he left, he gave his younger brother, my Dad, a briefcase which held all the $$ he'd saved saying something like, "Of all of us 4, you are the one to go to college and this will help". My Dad ended up going to Michigan Tech and earning a degree in Electrical Engineering. You have cable TV today partly because of him. After he died, I learned from his cronies, how instrumental my father was in not only Cable TV but in the design and laying of transatlantic cable. So he served his country in other ways.

My husband served in the Viet Nam years - teaching GIs how to build air strips. He never saw Viet Nam - at the very last minute his orders were changed. His brother in law was one of many who served and returned changed forever and still dealing with PTSD.

Hmm. Never meant to carry onÂ…(Nan, I'm talking and I can't shut up!)
A bench in our town park given to various towns by Coles Transportation and War Museum up in Bangor, ME

At Coles War Museum - a chopper from Nam

Memorial to Korean Vets at the same place

View from the front

Thank you to all and to our northern neighbors who have stood with us in many a conflict. (Sorry I don't have a Union Jack too to recognize our UK allies)

Nov 11, 2012 15:16:27   #
jfantasma (banned)
 
You are welcome for hosting today. As a Veteran this is a tiny way I can honor those who preceded me and those who are still serving as well as those who will serve in our future.

Modest Genius - Thank you for reposting here. Great photos the the different views you used. That last one is so majestic.

Roadrunner - Now how can we compare to those photos. Love em. My family finds it unusual that I always wear my hat now. I never wore them before. I stuck my Air Assault wings on it, my sniper badge, of course I have my expert rifle/pistol badge on it. Then after my injuries I worked for Secretary of the Army Dr. Francis J Harvey and them Mr. Peter Geren. so I wear my Department of the Army Staff Badge too. So yes I would say I am proud too. Thank you for sharing

Clicker - Fantastic photos as usual. Love those sad images of fallen soldiers, LEST WE FORGET!!!

MG - It was my pleasure to serve all of you wonderful people. There were times during my service that I doubted my service and those I was serving, but the first time I got off the airplane when we returned from deployment, there were crowds of people standing there cheering for us and thanking us. Since then I never doubted any of it again. I remembered that there are people out there who appreciate the sacrifices our soldiers are making. Thank you for thanking me! That is fine with your widcard. Hey if you have a family member that served feel free to post some. Archives are welcome too. I mean we aren't understanding people or anything you know LOL.

Subroto - Thank you for the comment. I totally agree with you. There are several countries that are debris ridden from war. Some will probably never recover and none will fully recover at all. Thank you for the enlightenment.

Rivernan - Sometimes it is better to say nothing than to not know what to say. It is what you show and not what you say. Thank you For Wom The Bell Tolls!! Excellent photos by the way.

Judy - Thank you! a Handsome guy indeed, But U think he is the lucky one.

Nan - Did you know that in the Army, we are not allowed to smile in our official photos? Your cousin has a great smile, bright and warming. I bet he warms up the room huh. Great photo thank you for posting.

Sue Jay - It is awesome that those young ones understand the meaning. It makes me smile to see them paying tributre. After all they are our future. Thanks for sharing. The band seems to lighten the mood a bit on days and events like these.

Plessner - That is a site I know so well. Them boots and kevlar helmets mounted like that on top of the rifle. At one of the camps we were at in Iraq, there was an entire field of them for the soldiers that had fallen. It got to the point at one time that the leadership was telling soldiers to buy an extra pair of boots. Thank you! The memorials in D.C. are great. When I worked in D.C. the Executive Officer for the Secretary of the Army was the commader for the Old Guard (Honor Guard). We got to watch the changing of the guard. The discipline that it takes to be in this elite group is amazing. They stitch thier own uniforms by hand and spend hours upon hours every single day making their uniforms look great.

Dansmith - Wow that is an amazing part of history right there. It is sad that awards are given to those who paid the ultimate sacrifice instead of those that are still living and being brave everyday. I hate the fact that they call the Medal of Honor "winners", winners. What did they win besides a medal to wear on their uniform in their casket? and those that are still living that "Won" didn't really win anything. Just a medal to hang up on the wall and a title that... yes is a "symbol" that shows the calibur of a man. But other than that has no meaning. A few extra dollars for saving the lives of fellow soldiers and losing a bunch of friends. In my personal opinion, I think every soldier on those frontlines should get the same respect. We are all expected to act on these values.

SheenaghGebhard - That is a very sad story but I am glad that you shared it. Love the photos what a great tribute.

Dane - Thank you for your service! nice tribute!

Georgiann - It is not the calibur of your comments it is the aoppreciation you show that counts. Excellent photos and a great tribute.

Oneyedjack - Thank you for your service. I like that photo and I hate it at the same time. Only beacause of what it resembles.

Pat (Mom) - Thank you. Love your photos and the story about your family. It is great to know your family history and share it with us and the younger generation in your family so that they can understand how it came to be. Your Father was a great man. He honored his brother by doing as he asked. In return he was able to have a beautiful family that can be proud to call him family. Thank you for sharing. Thank your dad for cable!! LOL that is a truley amazing story.
Nov 11, 2012 15:19:35   #
mgstrawn
 
Thank You ~


 
Nov 11, 2012 15:23:39   #
mgstrawn
 
subroto mukerji wrote:
I seen jfan's amazing pics, I seen the Roadrunner's wonderful photographs, I seen modest's memorial photos (last one was superb, modest) --- but there are millions here who've been fighting a war they know they can't win, generation after generation. Ever fought a war you know you'll never win, Double R ?? It can make the strongest turn to jelly.
Yet, for hundreds of years, the once-richest nation in the world has been systematically stripped of her uncountable wealth by a succession of foreign invaders, who've left in their wake some of the poorest and yet some of the noblest veterans of this unholy war.
This post is therefore a tribute to these veterans -- survivors of an unending battle against poverty, aided and abetted by a succession of governments that mouth platitudes, skim the cream and leave the poor toiling in the mud.
I seen jfan's amazing pics, I seen the Roadrunner'... (show quote)


It's good to see you, Subroto ~ very poignant and lovely photo (pg. 1)
Nov 11, 2012 15:25:23   #
Sendai5355
 
Thanks to all ours and our ally veterans that have served and are serving. With this in mind, I want to quote the last stanza of a poem I heard long ago. I don't know the author but it goes something like this:

"and when he gets to heaven,
to Saint Peter he will tell:
"Just another soldier reporting, Sir
I've served my time in hell."

Army Corps of Engineers 1966-1969.
Nov 11, 2012 15:28:11   #
jfantasma (banned)
 
Here are a few more from yesterdays shoot.






Nov 11, 2012 15:33:09   #
mgstrawn
 
Page 2

Nan - lovely photo and touching words! I love the perspective of the flag photo.

Suejay - just lovely photos! Thanks for posting from across the pond.

Plessner - Wow! All are wonderful . . . The hand photo is great ~

Dan - Thank you for sharing - great job and detail of the medals!
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