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Crop sensor camera verses full frame
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May 14, 2018 13:11:21   #
Mike Holmes
 
If this has been discussed before I apologize but I am new to photography and it seems to me that crop sensor cameras give you more bang for your buck. Assuming the crop sensor dslr has reasonable high resolution i.e. 24mp. With a crop sensor camera the cost of the lenses is less because of the 1.5 increase in magnification and the camera is also less money. I assume the image quality is somewhat better with full frame cameras but unless you are making very large prints will the results really be that apparent?
 
May 14, 2018 13:21:38   #
Shel B
 
I made the switch about a year ago. For most purposes I would say that the half frame is perfectly adequate. I see little if, any, difference between half and full frame when I view the images on my 55 inch high def tv. I haven't made any huge prints with the full frame. I have a 30x40 print made from my really, really old Panasonic half frame...6 megapixels, I think...and that photo held together well. All that said, I'm glad I made the switch.
May 14, 2018 13:23:00   #
mwsilvers (a regular here)
 
Mike Holmes wrote:
If this has been discussed before I apologize but I am new to photography and it seems to me that crop sensor cameras give you more bang for your buck. Assuming the crop sensor dslr has reasonable high resolution i.e. 24mp. With a crop sensor camera the cost of the lenses is less because of the 1.5 increase in magnification and the camera is also less money. I assume the image quality is somewhat better with full frame cameras but unless you are making very large prints will the results really be that apparent?
If this has been discussed before I apologize but ... (show quote)

The general topic of crop vs FF cameras or lenses has been brought up by newbies, and sometimes not so newbies, at least a few times a week, every week, for years. A few quick searches will result in more factual information, opinions, and misinformation then you'll ever want to read.
May 14, 2018 13:26:10   #
Mike Holmes
 
Thanks I will do a search. Sorry to rehash a old subject!!!
May 14, 2018 13:28:20   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
Mike Holmes wrote:
Thanks I will do a search. Sorry to rehash a old subject!!!


But you'll only find the posts where someone has put meaningful/related words in the title.
May 14, 2018 13:34:08   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
Here's a few pages to start with.

http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-453259-1.html

--
 
May 14, 2018 13:40:53   #
bkyser (a regular here)
 
For what it's worth, I have some 80" prints hanging that were done with a D-7000 crop sensor hung in office buildings that look fine when viewed close up (like within a foot or 2) not sure how large you think you need to print?
May 14, 2018 14:02:47   #
dsmeltz (a regular here)
 
Mike Holmes wrote:
If this has been discussed before I apologize but I am new to photography and it seems to me that crop sensor cameras give you more bang for your buck. Assuming the crop sensor dslr has reasonable high resolution i.e. 24mp. With a crop sensor camera the cost of the lenses is less because of the 1.5 increase in magnification and the camera is also less money. I assume the image quality is somewhat better with full frame cameras but unless you are making very large prints will the results really be that apparent?
If this has been discussed before I apologize but ... (show quote)


This all depends on what you are trying to accomplish and in what kind of conditions. There are those who swear by APS-C sensors for their reach when shooting sports or action wildlife. Others who depend on the low light capabilities of FF cameras for shooting street, event, concert etc... But, yes in certain settings a crop will get you "better bang for your buck"

A side note, professional sports photographers tend toward FF (though some use APS-C in certain settings) because they only care about the "better bang" at almost any cost. To them $10,000 for a lens seems reasonable.
May 14, 2018 14:36:00   #
repleo (a regular here)
 
Mike Holmes wrote:
If this has been discussed before I apologize but I am new to photography and it seems to me that crop sensor cameras give you more bang for your buck. Assuming the crop sensor dslr has reasonable high resolution i.e. 24mp. With a crop sensor camera the cost of the lenses is less because of the 1.5 increase in magnification and the camera is also less money. I assume the image quality is somewhat better with full frame cameras but unless you are making very large prints will the results really be that apparent?
If this has been discussed before I apologize but ... (show quote)


Your brief summation is pretty good. Crop sensor gear is also much smaller and lighter than FF. If you are thinking of getting a crop sensor camera, be sure to educate yourself on DSLR vs Mirrorless and on APS-C vs Micro 4/3 cameras. Don't just look at the camera - look at the whole system including lenses and their strengths and weaknesses for the uses you intend.
May 14, 2018 14:57:10   #
rmorrison1116 (a regular here)
 
Mike Holmes wrote:
Thanks I will do a search. Sorry to rehash a old subject!!!


Why are you sorry for bringing up a topic that has been previously discussed?!
There are far more members here who are more than willing to discuss just about any topic, old or new, than there are members who make it a point to scold folks for introducing a topic that has previously been discussed. After all, what is the purpose of having an interactive social media discussion web site if all one does it search for previous discussions. Doesn't sound very social or interactive to me.
May 14, 2018 16:19:52   #
mwsilvers (a regular here)
 
Mike Holmes wrote:
Thanks I will do a search. Sorry to rehash a old subject!!!


That's not a problem. If you do a search though you are likely to find much more information on this topic then you'll get in this thread.
 
May 14, 2018 16:19:56   #
bkyser (a regular here)
 
repleo wrote:
Your brief summation is pretty good. Crop sensor gear is also much smaller and lighter than FF. If you are thinking of getting a crop sensor camera, be sure to educate yourself on DSLR vs Mirrorless and on APS-C vs Micro 4/3 cameras. Don't just look at the camera - look at the whole system including lenses and their strengths and weaknesses for the uses you intend.


Go to a camera store and compare a D-500 to any FF camera below a D-800, it's larger and heavier than the D-750, D700, and D600. It's also incredible in low light, and the focus system is incredible.

The "lines" between FF and DX are getting "blurred"
May 14, 2018 16:49:47   #
Kmgw9v (a regular here)
 
DX cameras are great; but if there is a chance you will come down with Full Frame GAS in the future....
Full frame lenses are expensive--but you get what you pay for in the end.
May 14, 2018 16:58:57   #
TriX (a regular here)
 
It’s commonly thought that being able to enlarge to a larger size print is the advantage with full frame - it isn’t - good sized prints have been made from 8 MP cameras. The key advantage is better low noise performance at high ISOs. Depending on what you like to shoot, a surprisingly large percentage of shots are taken in low available light where a flash isn’t usable/permitted, and when you need to shoot at ISO 6400 to 12,800 (which is typical for available light with indoor sports, churches, ceremonies, indoor weddings and performances, Astro photography, etc.) you'll understand why the extra cost and weight of FF is worth it.
May 14, 2018 19:17:41   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
In my opinion if one uses the M43 or the APS-C cameras from Fuji or the Sony ML APS-C (as in A6000) I think it's fine. However, using something like Nikon or Canon DSLR in APS-C one often has to use FX or EF lenses and I feel it's waste because one doesn't use the full image formed by the lenses.
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