Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Home | Photography Digest | Active Topics | Newest Pictures | Search | Login | Register | Help
Main Photography Discussion
Worst Digital Photography Suggestion/Tip?
(?)
If you would like to post a reply, then please login (if you already have an account) or register (if you don't).
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 11 next>>
Feb 12, 2018 07:20:56   #
Feiertag (a regular here)
 
Mine was to shoot in Aperture Priority Mode. When I started taking photos of birds and becoming familiar with my Canon T3i, I was advised by the seasoned photographers, to do so.

As I look at my older shots, many very ruined by blur.

What was the worst suggest that you have been given?
 
Feb 12, 2018 07:26:27   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
Feiertag wrote:
Mine was to shoot in Aperture Priority Mode. When I started taking photos of birds and becoming familiar with my Canon T3i, I was advised by the seasoned photographers, to do so.

As I look at my older shots, many very ruined by blur.

What was the worst suggest that you have been given?


Shooting in shutter priority.

Aperture is good for many situations, but not where the subject is likely to be moving fast. Sloths, yes; birds, no.
Feb 12, 2018 07:27:51   #
Feiertag (a regular here)
 
jerryc41 wrote:
Shooting in shutter priority.

Aperture is good for many situations, but not where the subject is likely to be moving fast. Sloths, yes; birds, no.

Ha ha Jerry. B^)
Feb 12, 2018 07:29:30   #
ELNikkor (a regular here)
 
Shooting on "A". You get the timing right, and, the camera thinks about it, then decides the flash has to pop up and cue awhile before it is ready, and the flash would have ruined the shot anyhow...
Feb 12, 2018 07:43:54   #
WessoJPEG (a regular here)
 
Feiertag wrote:
Mine was to shoot in Aperture Priority Mode. When I started taking photos of birds and becoming familiar with my Canon T3i, I was advised by the seasoned photographers, to do so.

As I look at my older shots, many very ruined by blur.

What was the worst suggest that you have been given?


Shooting in auto.
Feb 12, 2018 07:49:53   #
Gene51 (a regular here)
 
Feiertag wrote:
Mine was to shoot in Aperture Priority Mode. When I started taking photos of birds and becoming familiar with my Canon T3i, I was advised by the seasoned photographers, to do so.

As I look at my older shots, many very ruined by blur.

What was the worst suggest that you have been given?


I use that all the time - and I shoot lots of birds in flight. Never noticed an issue. But they gave you incomplete advice - you still have to remain conscious of your shutter speed and ISO.
 
Feb 12, 2018 07:51:04   #
SueScott (a regular here)
 
I keep seeing on Facebook advice about smearing Vaseline on a lens to create a "dreamy look" to one's photos. Who in their right mind would ever do such a STUPID thing to their equipment!
Feb 12, 2018 07:57:03   #
boberic (a regular here)
 
Leave the camera at home, we will only be out for a few minutes
Feb 12, 2018 07:58:16   #
Feiertag (a regular here)
 
Gene51 wrote:
I use that all the time - and I shoot lots of birds in flight. Never noticed an issue. But they gave you incomplete advice - you still have to remain conscious of your shutter speed and ISO.

Thank you for the comment, Gene. I usually kept my aperture wide open to get the speed and kept the ISO at a minimum. Keep in mind, I was at the learning stage which hasn't changed. I learn something each day.

I now strikingly shoot manual with auto ISO for my birding shots.
Feb 12, 2018 08:00:36   #
ronz
 
Back in the film days we put rubber cement around the edges of a FILTER, not the Lens and you did get some nice effects. The good part is you could easily rub the rubber cement off when you were finished with the shoot. Now they have filters which do a much better job or use PS.
Feb 12, 2018 08:24:22   #
Rick from NY
 
SueScott wrote:
I keep seeing on Facebook advice about smearing Vaseline on a lens to create a "dreamy look" to one's photos. Who in their right mind would ever do such a STUPID thing to their equipment!


Actually, in the pre digital days when you did not have the option of "fixing it in post", Vaseline on a lens (actually most of us put it on a filter, not directly on the lens) was a viable way to achieve soft focus if one did not have their Softar filter with him or couldn't manage to borrow a pair of nylons from a female. (if you are under 60, Google nylons). And those who did in fact smear the goo on their lenses directly did not have to worry about ruining the coatings on the lenses since old time lenses were not super multicoated as they are today. In fact, before all of the many different coatings now available and before there were microfiber cloths, if one found oneself in the field without lens tissue and lens cleaner solution, one cleaned his lens with the bottom of his tee shirt and some breath fog or, if all else failed, spit. Yeah - I know - but in an emergency, it worked.
 
Feb 12, 2018 10:27:41   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
For digital - advice to underexpose "for saturation" is the worst DSLR advice I've heard and occasionally still read. You only get noisy underexposed images, nothing quality. Rather, expose for the highlights, up to the edge of over-exposure, whether JPEG or RAW. Address saturation and vibrance in Post using an image captured at the best possible digital exposure.
Feb 12, 2018 12:53:12   #
G Brown (a regular here)
 
Telling beginners to shoot in manual...
Can't tell you how many times that comes up.....

Shooting manual is great.....once you have learned that you 'can actually' get great shots by letting the camera 'help'. Walk before you run......

There is a good reason why nearly all cameras come with program modes.
Feb 12, 2018 12:59:56   #
jcboy3 (a regular here)
 
SueScott wrote:
I keep seeing on Facebook advice about smearing Vaseline on a lens to create a "dreamy look" to one's photos. Who in their right mind would ever do such a STUPID thing to their equipment!


Use a filter.
Feb 12, 2018 13:51:15   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
G Brown wrote:
Telling beginners to shoot in manual...
Can't tell you how many times that comes up.....

Shooting manual is great.....once you have learned that you 'can actually' get great shots by letting the camera 'help'. Walk before you run......

There is a good reason why nearly all cameras come with program modes.


If the beginner wants to learn about the technical side of photography then he/she should start in manual. If he/she doesn't care about the technical side then it doesn't matter. For an advanced photographer using any mode doesn't matter. An advanced photographer doesn't need suggestion or tip on which mode to use.
You can get the camera to set to any settings you want by leaving it on program mode so there is no need to use manual mode to control the camera your way. The manual mode helps the learning process if one cares to learn. Starting with program mode one tends to get stuck with it which is not a bad thing unless one later wants to use the manual mode.
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 11 next>>
Main Photography Discussion
Home | Latest Digest | Back to Top | All Sections
Contact us | Privacy policy | Terms of use
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2018 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.