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Canon vs Nikon: Which is better?
Here is the truth one of them doesn't want you to know
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Main Photography Discussion
Old lenses on Nikon D5100
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Jun 29, 2012 02:45:34   #
joanpartridge
 
I'm debating getting a Nikon d5100 or a Canon T3i. My Dad, who used to shoot architecture professionally using Nikons (pre DSLR) has a lot of old lenses he might give me. He does not have any old Canon lenses. How useful would these old lenses be? How easy are they to use on a Nikon d5100? How is the crop factor effected and how easy is it to guess what the frame of the picture is actually going to be? So I guess I am really asking, all other things being equal, should my choice of a new DSLR be weighed toward the Nikon just because I have access to old lenses?
 
Jun 29, 2012 07:14:05   #
snowbear
 
You can use old Nikon lenses on the D5100. You may not have auto-focus and the meter may not work, but they will mount and they will take photos. If you go to the Nikon website and look at the specifications on the D5100, you will see a list of lens categories that can be used and the limitations. My macro (close up) lens is an old Nikon from around 1980, and I use it on a D40 (closer to a D3000 than the D5100). A readily supply of free or or inexpensive high-quality lenses is certainly something to consider.

The crop factor on a Nikon APC-S body is 1.5, while the Canons are 1.6. It is not an issue - you are looking through the lens. The actual photo will be a slightly larger area than you see.

Go to a store and hold both models. You should go with one that feels "right" in your hand, where you can reach all of the controls comfortably.
Jun 29, 2012 14:02:23   #
joanpartridge
 
Thanks Snowbear. I am so glad you responded. You have cut through my confusion very nicely.
Jun 29, 2012 14:15:25   #
snowbear
 
joanpartridge wrote:
Thanks Snowbear. I am so glad you responded. You have cut through my confusion very nicely.

The key with the older Nikkors is the manual focus and possible metering issues. Check the website for the list and download a copy of the user's manual.
Jun 29, 2012 14:16:26   #
tk
 
I have done this. Yes, they work BUT no AF and you must adjust Aperture on lens.
Jun 29, 2012 15:23:39   #
St3v3M (a regular here)
 
joanpartridge wrote:
I'm debating getting a Nikon d5100 or a Canon T3i. My Dad, who used to shoot architecture professionally using Nikons (pre DSLR) has a lot of old lenses he might give me. He does not have any old Canon lenses. How useful would these old lenses be? How easy are they to use on a Nikon d5100? How is the crop factor effected and how easy is it to guess what the frame of the picture is actually going to be? So I guess I am really asking, all other things being equal, should my choice of a new DSLR be weighed toward the Nikon just because I have access to old lenses?
I'm debating getting a Nikon d5100 or a Canon T3i.... (show quote)


Wisdom state that you stay with the system that you know, but since you asked,
CANON REBEL T3i VS NIKON D5100
http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-T3i-vs-Nikon-D5100
Winner NIKON D5100
 
Jun 30, 2012 06:25:55   #
ecobin (a regular here)
 
I use my Nikon pre-dslr lenses (28-85mm & 70-200mm) on my D80 and everything works including autofocus and metering.
Jun 30, 2012 08:44:49   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
ecobin wrote:
I use my Nikon pre-dslr lenses (28-85mm & 70-200mm) on my D80 and everything works including autofocus and metering.

The D5100 doesn't have a focusing motor in the body, so it relies on a motor in the lens.
Jun 30, 2012 08:47:12   #
TJ28012
 
ecobin wrote:
I use my Nikon pre-dslr lenses (28-85mm & 70-200mm) on my D80 and everything works including autofocus and metering.


Can you use un-modified "Non-AI" lenses on a D80? How about on a D5100?
Jun 30, 2012 08:47:42   #
brianjdavies
 
This is a timely topic. I have just bought a Nikon D5100 as a second (or third....) body. I was attracted by the swivelling LCD screen as I was getting cricks in my neck doing macrophotograhy at strange angles. I have many old AI-s Nikon lenses, and I intend to try them on the 5100, though the manual points out that metering won't work. No problem, as I have a couple of hand-held meters anyway.

Do let us know what you decided Joan. Both are really good cameras.
Jun 30, 2012 08:56:41   #
snowbear
 
TJ28012 wrote:
Can you use un-modified "Non-AI" lenses on a D80? How about on a D5100?

No, not the non-AI lenses (D80). If you still have the user's manual, pages 117 & 118 give you a rundown on compatibility.

Edit:It appears the D5100 can use non-AI lenses but you lose metering. I just found this chart - the author converts the non-AI lenses; I think the conversions are classified AI-d.
http://www.aiconversions.com/compatibilitytable.htm
 
Jun 30, 2012 10:09:09   #
h2odog
 
If you could swing it and get a Nikon D7000, you would be able to use all the old Nikon lenses and and having the info window on top of the camera is extremely useful. I originally had the D3100, sold it for the D7000 and couldn't be happier.
Jun 30, 2012 10:29:20   #
Screamin Scott (a regular here)
 
As already noted, there will be no problems mounting & using the old lenses on a D5100. Some situations will be harder to capture (eg: fast action or rapidly changing light levels) but for most scenarios, it's not hard at all. I use a lot of older manual focus lenses on a D70s (doesn't meter or focus with MF glass)without a problem. Most of the shots on my Flickr stream were taken that way. Some of the newer ones were shot using a D300, but still with older MF lenses.
Jun 30, 2012 13:29:17   #
St3v3M (a regular here)
 
jerryc41 wrote:
The D5100 doesn't have a focusing motor in the body, so it relies on a motor in the lens.


Hey Jerry, I keep hearing about this. Is it a big deal?
Jun 30, 2012 13:29:17   #
St3v3M (a regular here)
 
jerryc41 wrote:
The D5100 doesn't have a focusing motor in the body, so it relies on a motor in the lens.


Hey Jerry, I keep hearing about this. Is it a big deal?
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