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Eclipse Prep
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Aug 16, 2017 19:45:39   #
dfcredo
 
I'm getting ready for the eclipse and practicing photographing the sun (with solar filter); but having sharpness issues. Tripoded, Mirror Up,Remote release, ISO 200, f8, 1/000 with an 80-400 at 400. Photo still seems a bit off.
Suggestions?


 
Aug 16, 2017 19:59:17   #
ggttc
 
Is that 1/1000 of sec shutter speed?

If it is the image should look nothing like that.

Tons of CA....

Hmmmmm....
F 7.1 1/500 ISO 200 No mirror lock up
F 7.1 1/500  ISO 200 No mirror lock up...
(Download)
Aug 16, 2017 22:58:41   #
rehess (a regular here)
 
dfcredo wrote:
I'm getting ready for the eclipse and practicing photographing the sun (with solar filter); but having sharpness issues. Tripod, Mirror Up,Remote release, ISO 200, f8, 1/000 with an 80-400 at 400. Photo still seems a bit off.
Suggestions?
I'm not sure why you need mirror up when the shutter speed is 1/1000 ... but it isn't doing any harm. The photo looks seriously over-exposed to my eyes. In your situation I would go with lowest possible ISO setting, smallest aperture you're comfortable working with, and then try faster shutter speeds and see if "doubling" the speed {going from 1/1000 to 1/2000 for example} improves the image any. You still have several days until the eclipse, so you could try increasing lower exposure until the image begins to look more reasonably dark.

During the eclipse, of course, you'll have a minute or two two examine your image and make last-minute improvements.
Aug 16, 2017 23:37:56   #
Math78
 
You are not focused on the sun. You should be able to clearly see a sunspot right now. Auto focus can work, but it can be difficult to lock on to the low contrast solar disk. I find ISO 100, 1/100 sec at f8 works pretty good with my filter.
Aug 17, 2017 06:04:56   #
Lowrider
 
What kind of solar filter are you using? I have been shooting at ISO 400, F/8, 1/2-1 sec and my pictures have been fine. I don't know what camera you are using but both Canon and Nikon have good websites on how to photograph the eclipse.
Aug 17, 2017 06:15:28   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
dfcredo wrote:
I'm getting ready for the eclipse and practicing photographing the sun (with solar filter); but having sharpness issues. Tripoded, Mirror Up,Remote release, ISO 200, f8, 1/000 with an 80-400 at 400. Photo still seems a bit off.
Suggestions?


Keep practicing. You'll get there.
 
Aug 17, 2017 06:56:15   #
swsands
 
dfcredo wrote:
I'm getting ready for the eclipse and practicing photographing the sun (with solar filter); but having sharpness issues. Tripoded, Mirror Up,Remote release, ISO 200, f8, 1/000 with an 80-400 at 400. Photo still seems a bit off.
Suggestions?


Well there's the problem!!! You are dividing by zero!! That causes all kinds of problems! :)
Aug 17, 2017 13:03:22   #
PHRubin (a regular here)
 
Is the filter a proper solar filter? From the camera settings you indicate and the overexposed look of the image, I suspect not. You should NOT be able to see anything through it other than the sun.
Aug 17, 2017 14:10:34   #
ebercovici
 
I thought of a logical way to observe and photograph the eclipse. The time-tested way to observe the sun was with a pinhole box. You could take a box that has a lid and attach a piece of white paper to the bottom. Make a pinhole opening in the center of the lid and another hole into which you will insert the end of a macro lens. Secure the macro lens to the box with black electrical tape. Observing and photographing an image through a digital camera and a pinhole "camera" should be totally safe for your camera and your eyes. Remember to point the pinhole device at the sun. My last sentence was a joke.
Aug 17, 2017 15:14:02   #
russchristopher
 
I also tend to suspect an issue with your solar filter. There should certainly be much more contrast between the yellow-red glow of the sun from the surrounding blackness if the filter is working as it should. The more expensive and well fitting the filter, the more sharp the margins of the sun should be. Even your camera's auto setting should give you a decent image.
Aug 17, 2017 16:35:13   #
ggttc
 
russchristopher wrote:
I also tend to suspect an issue with your solar filter. There should certainly be much more contrast between the yellow-red glow of the sun from the surrounding blackness if the filter is working as it should. The more expensive and well fitting the filter, the more sharp the margins of the sun should be. Even your camera's auto setting should give you a decent image.


That makes sense...take the filter off your camera and go outside. Point it at the brightest thing you can find (not the sun)...if you can see anything but total blackness your filter is not safe.
 
Aug 17, 2017 17:14:49   #
russchristopher
 
I would give you an A for that answer. I am unable to view anything through my solar filter or glasses except the ball of light from the sun.
Aug 17, 2017 22:24:08   #
wmurnahan (a regular here)
 
That don't look like it has the proper solar filter.
Aug 19, 2017 08:49:27   #
dfcredo
 
Thanks. I lowered ISO to 100, f/8 @ 1/125 auto focus with no mirror up. Had some slight clouds around.

Seems a little sharper. I'll keep practicing. Should i remove the skylight protective filter before adding the solar filter? It was on for these.

Thanks for your input.




Aug 19, 2017 09:32:03   #
wmurnahan (a regular here)
 
Take off the skylight, the only thing it is doing is shooting through another layer.
 
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