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How to set up softboxes so there is no reflection in the glass
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Jul 28, 2017 11:44:18   #
Golden Rule
 
I set up an umbrella tilted upward on the right and had a small lamp on the left side because I only have one strobe. I did not use my two softboxes on this experiment but will most likely need them? My problem is there wasn't enough light for the real cat to bring out any detail. I had some noise due to low light but I don't want reflection coming off the glass in the picture on the wall. Any solutions on setting up my lighting? I have one strobe with umbrella and two softboxes to work with.I don't like the dullness of the whole photo. Thanks!


(Download)


(Download)
 
Jul 28, 2017 11:50:12   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
Just to clarify, do you have strobes for the soft boxes?
--Bob
Golden Rule wrote:
I set up an umbrella tilted upward on the right and had a small lamp on the left side because I only have one strobe. I did not use my two softboxes on this experiment but will most likely need them? My problem is there wasn't enough light for the real cat to bring out any detail. I had some noise due to low light but I don't want reflection coming off the glass in the picture on the wall. Any solutions on setting up my lighting? I have one strobe with umbrella and two softboxes to work with. Thanks!
I set up an umbrella tilted upward on the right an... (show quote)
Jul 28, 2017 12:03:53   #
Golden Rule
 
rmalarz wrote:
Just to clarify, do you have strobes for the soft boxes?
--Bob


No. It is a constant light.
Jul 28, 2017 12:08:34   #
chapjohn
 
One thing to consider is making your light souce bigger than your subjects to get the same light in the whole picture. A reflecting umbrella with off camera flash might be an option.
Jul 28, 2017 12:19:59   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
Perfect. I'd use those, Set each of them at 45 degrees to the reflective surface. Turn all other lights off in the room. That should do it.
--Bob
Golden Rule wrote:
No. It is a constant light.
Jul 28, 2017 12:31:56   #
R.G. (a regular here)
 
I think it will help if you avoid standing square on to the glass. If, for example you stood slightly to the left and had your main source of light even further left (i.e. to the left of you), there wouldn't be any reflections coming back to the camera - they would all be off to the right. And to counteract the shadows you could bounce off of the ceiling using a directional light, either behind you or to your right (but not at eye level, to avoid direct reflections).
 
Jul 28, 2017 12:33:07   #
Golden Rule
 
rmalarz wrote:
Perfect. I'd use those, Set each of them at 45 degrees to the reflective surface. Turn all other lights off in the room. That should do it.
--Bob


Thank you so much! I am going to do just that and give it a go this weekend!
Jul 29, 2017 13:27:02   #
Flyerace (a regular here)
 
Just to clarify cat actions. The first photo shows lovely flowers in a glass vase. The second without the flowers. Did the cat sweep the flowers off the credenza? (LOL)
Jul 30, 2017 12:18:30   #
amfoto1 (a regular here)
 
You are thinking about and approaching this wrong.

You actually NEED some reflections in the glass to "define" a clear object. Without some reflections, it will virtually disappear and at best appear two dimensional.

For example, the following image was shot with a big, white softbox on one side of the object and a large black flag opposite, both of which reflect in the clear glass to define the shape of the object and to give a more three-dimensional impression...


Another example, this time with the subject set on a translucent light table and illuminated from below to define the shape and three-dimensionality of the object...


A Circular Polarizing filter can used to control some reflections. In the below example - done by window light, with reflectors - a C-Pol was used carefully so that the transparent packaging was apparent, but the product inside was still fully visible...


In fact, it's the same with a reflection in a person's or animal's eye... A "catch light" is important to make an animal look alive and vital. Without it they'll look artificial, inanimate...


"Eliminating reflections" from the glass vase would also eliminate the catch light in the cat's eyes.

In other words, don't try to ELIMINATE the reflections... USE THEM! They're important aspects of the image.

BTW: Both your example images are at least a full stop under-exposed. Why are you using ISO 200. With a D750 should be able to shoot at least ISO 800 without any noise issues. That might also allow you to stop the lens down to f/4 or f/5.6 (in your first example, the painting on the wall and it's frame are slightly "soft" due to shallow depth of field... while the cat, vase and flowers in front of them are nice and sharp... but maybe that was intentional). Under-exposure leads to noise when you have to boost exposure in post-processing. To minimize noise, you're usually better off slightly over-exposing and "pulling" image exposure back down a little (1/3 to 1/2 stop, max).

Yours is a very cooperative cat!
Aug 1, 2017 13:23:43   #
Golden Rule
 
Very well stated amfoto1. I will slightly over-expose this next time and yes, I want the picture behind the cat to be sharp too. Trying to challenge myself with this photo for fun and learning.

amfoto1 wrote:
You are thinking about and approaching this wrong.

You actually NEED some reflections in the glass to "define" a clear object. Without some reflections, it will virtually disappear and at best appear two dimensional.

For example, the following image was shot with a big, white softbox on one side of the object and a large black flag opposite, both of which reflect in the clear glass to define the shape of the object and to give a more three-dimensional impression...


Another example, this time with the subject set on a translucent light table and illuminated from below to define the shape and three-dimensionality of the object...


A Circular Polarizing filter can used to control some reflections. In the below example - done by window light, with reflectors - a C-Pol was used carefully so that the transparent packaging was apparent, but the product inside was still fully visible...


In fact, it's the same with a reflection in a person's or animal's eye... A "catch light" is important to make an animal look alive and vital. Without it they'll look artificial, inanimate...


"Eliminating reflections" from the glass vase would also eliminate the catch light in the cat's eyes.

In other words, don't try to ELIMINATE the reflections... USE THEM! They're important aspects of the image.

BTW: Both your example images are at least a full stop under-exposed. Why are you using ISO 200. With a D750 should be able to shoot at least ISO 800 without any noise issues. That might also allow you to stop the lens down to f/4 or f/5.6 (in your first example, the painting on the wall and it's frame are slightly "soft" due to shallow depth of field... while the cat, vase and flowers in front of them are nice and sharp... but maybe that was intentional). Under-exposure leads to noise when you have to boost exposure in post-processing. To minimize noise, you're usually better off slightly over-exposing and "pulling" image exposure back down a little (1/3 to 1/2 stop, max).

Yours is a very cooperative cat!
You are thinking about and approaching this wrong.... (show quote)
Sep 19, 2017 20:51:17   #
Golden Rule
 
Okay, I gave this another try with my softboxes at a 45 degree angle and no glare on the glass!


(Download)


(Download)
 
Sep 20, 2017 07:22:17   #
CHRISTINA71
 
Golden Rule wrote:
Okay, I gave this another try with my softboxes at a 45 degree angle and no glare on the glass!


Beautiful!
Sep 29, 2017 23:08:36   #
papa (a regular here)
 
Golden Rule wrote:
Okay, I gave this another try with my softboxes at a 45 degree angle and no glare on the glass!


Let me see is it, "The one with the gold, makes the rules", or...? (snicker) That's a much better exposure and contrary to whosit's comment there are still catch-lights in the cats eyes. Maybe that would work with Rembrandt lighting, too. I'll give 'er a go and let you know. LOL.
Nov 8, 2017 11:02:57   #
iggy
 
Just for grins. Next time you photograph your cat in front of the painting, use the same bowl and pitcher as props.
Nov 12, 2017 06:52:33   #
bmike101 (new user)
 
amfoto1 wrote:

Under-exposure leads to noise when you have to boost exposure in post-processing. To minimize noise, you're usually better off slightly over-exposing and "pulling" image exposure back down a little (1/3 to 1/2 stop, max).


So that is why my pictures are noisy when I magnify them! That is a great piece of advice. So then my camera is right when it says my image is under-exposed. I would always set it to where it says my images are a little under-exposed and my pictures are always a little noisy.
 
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