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Depth Perception
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Jun 21, 2017 08:41:35   #
melueth
 
Hey all - just came back from a neat trip to the Berkshires to try my hand at some waterfall photography. I learned a great deal, but am still a little baffled by this geological dilemma. The rock face that obscures a part of the waterfall below is a pretty fair distance from the actual falling water, but it doesn't look that way in any of my shots. The shots look very 2 dimensional, and i'm wondering if there's a way to either take the shot so that the distance between the 2 objects is more apparent, or post process it to bring that feature out. I took this one without a tripod, unfortunately; i just wasn't prepared when i set out, but found myself there and had to at least try a shot! Shot in RAW, ISO 250; 33mm; f10; 1/30. Any ideas?

Marylea
Race Brook Upper Falls
Race Brook Upper Falls...
(Download)
 
Jun 21, 2017 09:00:21   #
SonyA580
 
I would try some contrast adjustments to separate the rock from the water. I increased the darker levels in Photoshop and it made a big difference. You could also do the same thing on the RAW file. Nice shot!
Jun 22, 2017 06:39:25   #
fuminous
 
Yes, SonyA580 is right; tonal value changes might provide the aerial perspective you're wanting.

Darker, sharper, more contrast in foreground (elements advance), lighter, less contrast in background (elements recede).
Jun 22, 2017 08:56:33   #
melueth
 
Thanks very much! I'd done some of that, but not outside of Lightroom.

ML
Jul 13, 2017 21:17:01   #
Charmdragon
 
Without seeing the whole scene with at least a 180-degree perspective, I believe what you are looking for is the 'perception' of depth. One way is to change your f-stop to make the rockface appear out of focus. That brings the focus of your subject (the waterfall) into stronger focus (the difference is creating a separation in the viewer's eye). You may have to zoom in or get physically closer (I can't tell from your image if that is possible). Another option may be to darken the rockface as though it is shade which will also highlight your subject with separation. An interesting tip I was given about waterfalls is that the water does travel the exact same path every moment. So once you have the focus and composition you want...take about five extra shots a few seconds apart. When you review them for processing, you will likely find a favored path from one image over all the others that enhances the presentation of the waterfall.
Jul 14, 2017 06:59:14   #
melueth
 
Charmdragon wrote:
Without seeing the whole scene with at least a 180-degree perspective, I believe what you are looking for is the 'perception' of depth. One way is to change your f-stop to make the rockface appear out of focus. That brings the focus of your subject (the waterfall) into stronger focus (the difference is creating a separation in the viewer's eye). You may have to zoom in or get physically closer (I can't tell from your image if that is possible). Another option may be to darken the rockface as though it is shade which will also highlight your subject with separation. An interesting tip I was given about waterfalls is that the water does travel the exact same path every moment. So once you have the focus and composition you want...take about five extra shots a few seconds apart. When you review them for processing, you will likely find a favored path from one image over all the others that enhances the presentation of the waterfall.
Without seeing the whole scene with at least a 180... (show quote)


Great tips - thanks very much! It was a rugged climb to get to this waterfall, and this was as close as i could get, but i'm going back next June and will be better prepared! Thanks again.

ML
 
Jul 16, 2017 18:04:25   #
SoHillGuy (a regular here)
 
The use of a wider angle lens would have shown more separation. If you concentrate on the lower portion of your photo you will see the separation from the upper portion. It just not that obvious due to the angle of the perspective.
Jul 18, 2017 08:12:05   #
rpavich
 
melueth wrote:
Hey all - just came back from a neat trip to the Berkshires to try my hand at some waterfall photography. I learned a great deal, but am still a little baffled by this geological dilemma. The rock face that obscures a part of the waterfall below is a pretty fair distance from the actual falling water, but it doesn't look that way in any of my shots. The shots look very 2 dimensional, and i'm wondering if there's a way to either take the shot so that the distance between the 2 objects is more apparent, or post process it to bring that feature out. I took this one without a tripod, unfortunately; i just wasn't prepared when i set out, but found myself there and had to at least try a shot! Shot in RAW, ISO 250; 33mm; f10; 1/30. Any ideas?

Marylea
Hey all - just came back from a neat trip to the B... (show quote)


Yes, there is a way; get closer and use a wider lens. Longer lenses at farther distances tend to mash the "near / far" distinction between objects whereas wide lenses tend to accentuate them.

Lens selection is a tool in your arsenal to use to create certain effects like object relationship in a photo.
Jul 19, 2017 08:45:43   #
melueth
 
Got it on the wider angle lens and proximity. I have another trip to this area planned for next year and will be better prepared for this one! Thanks for your insights and for taking a look!

Marylea
Jul 25, 2017 09:04:08   #
docdish
 
You have a hyper-focal shot. If you want depth try opening the lens and spot focusing on your main subject. Most "program" settings are trying very hard to get everything in focus. You could use a "softening" tool on the foreground.
Jul 26, 2017 06:46:15   #
melueth
 
docdish wrote:
You have a hyper-focal shot. If you want depth try opening the lens and spot focusing on your main subject. Most "program" settings are trying very hard to get everything in focus. You could use a "softening" tool on the foreground.


Right - this was taken in aperture priority mode. I get a second chance next June and this will be tried. Thanks for the advice!

ML
 
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