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Avoiding / Minimizing Glare in photos
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Jun 8, 2017 15:46:21   #
Harry_64
 
I am trying to take photos of old family photographs. The problem is the photos are framed and the glass covering is convex. The photos/frames are probably between 80 and 100+ years old. I do not want to remove photos from frames for fear of damaging either the frame or photos. Is there a way to either photograph the photos without glare or to remove the glare using Photoshop?


 
Jun 8, 2017 15:50:51   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
You might try a high quality Polarizer, such as a B+W Kaesemann Circular Polarizer with Multi-Resistant Coating. Or, some very intricate lighting setup.
--Bob


Harry_64 wrote:
I am trying to take photos of old family photographs. The problem is the photos are framed and the glass covering is convex. The photos/frames are probably between 80 and 100+ years old. I do not want to remove photos from frames for fear of damaging either the frame or photos. Is there a way to either photograph the photos without glare or to remove the glare using Photoshop?
Jun 8, 2017 15:57:36   #
RWR (a regular here)
 
Harry_64 wrote:
I am trying to take photos of old family photographs. The problem is the photos are framed and the glass covering is convex. The photos/frames are probably between 80 and 100+ years old. I do not want to remove photos from frames for fear of damaging either the frame or photos. Is there a way to either photograph the photos without glare or to remove the glare using Photoshop?

If you cannot position the lights so as to eliminate glare with only a polarizer on the lens, you may also need to use polarizers on the lights.
Jun 8, 2017 16:29:27   #
blue-ultra (a regular here)
 
If you are careful, there is not a problem with removing the photographs. I have done it in the past without too much trouble. You just need to take your time. It is a lot easier than all those expensive polarizers... and you will get better results as the glass without doubt will have dust on the inside...

bob
Jun 8, 2017 16:53:28   #
clickalot
 
Assuming you are only interested in the subject contained in the frame, you can capture two or more images with the glass at slightly different angles relative to the main light so the the glare occurs at different locations on the subject of the photograph. The exposure should be the same for images. Then, in PS or PSE you can add all the images in one common stack in separate layers, and then after aligning the subject in all layers, mask out the portions with glare. It can likely be done with 3 or maybe 2 shots of the same subject.
Jun 8, 2017 17:31:56   #
G Brown
 
Take it out of the glare and raise your exposure time - the camera will 'see' in the dark! so a slightly 'dull' picture shouldn't be too much of an effort for it. Do not use flash use time to extend the shutter speed.

At least try it before buying more kit.

Have fun
 
Jun 9, 2017 09:03:12   #
elee950021
 
Harry_64 wrote:
I am trying to take photos of old family photographs. The problem is the photos are framed and the glass covering is convex. The photos/frames are probably between 80 and 100+ years old. I do not want to remove photos from frames for fear of damaging either the frame or photos. Is there a way to either photograph the photos without glare or to remove the glare using Photoshop?


Yes, you can try 4 things. 1. Angle your original (you might have to try different positions) to minimize glare. Bring the image back to square using PS. 2. Turn the room lights off or block any area which might reflect light into original (notice the reflection of something at lower right?) 3. Use a piece of black mat board and cut a hole just big enough to put your camera lens through. The board should block any or most of possible glare. 4. Use removable Krylon Matte spray to treat the glass.
Jun 9, 2017 10:27:16   #
MCHUGH
 
I would go with the suggestion of RWR using a polarizer on the lens and use polarizers on the lights. This is a very useful setup for many applications. I used it back when I was in business on all copy work and I am sure it would work on your job. It was great when coping old prints that had silvered over the years to the point you could not see detail in the shiny dark areas but when photographed this way you could eliminate the shinny area and see the detail. Also took reflections off metal. Just make sure all lights are turned off in the room you are doing your copies, you don't want extraneous light on the photo glass.
Jun 9, 2017 14:47:58   #
cambriaman (a regular here)
 
Wear black clothing and hang a black sheet behind yourself when taking the images. The advice from elee950021 is very good as well.
Jun 9, 2017 18:07:29   #
fetzler
 
McHugh has the right info. Only addition is light positioning. 45 degree angle using two lights works well. You may need to adjust angles because of curved glass.
Jun 10, 2017 01:17:55   #
The Clown in chief45
 
Im sure if you did some long exposures in the dark and basically "light Piant" the photos you could get some great shots, you will just have to experiment with length of exposure and the angle and brightness of the flashlight, maybe even use some different colored fabric, like bandanas, over the flashlight, that would probably add some different tones
 
Jun 10, 2017 20:48:17   #
SusanFromVermont (a regular here)
 
Harry_64 wrote:
I am trying to take photos of old family photographs. The problem is the photos are framed and the glass covering is convex. The photos/frames are probably between 80 and 100+ years old. I do not want to remove photos from frames for fear of damaging either the frame or photos. Is there a way to either photograph the photos without glare or to remove the glare using Photoshop?

I can understand your hesitancy at attempting to remove the photos from the frames. Some of those old frames are put together so well that it makes it harder to remove the backing without damaging or even breaking it [or even possibly the frame]. Age plays a part in that because the wood can become dried out and brittle. I have an old picture [a mezzotint over 100 years old] that needed a new mat, so I did take the backing off - it was thin wood slats and some of them did break. The ornate frame also had some pieces that broke off, but I saved them and was able to put them back on later.

The basic problem with photographing any image under glass is the reflections of light on the glass. If you have any photography lights you can use, arrange them so they are aimed at the ceiling or a wall. This will create "bounced light" which is both indirect and more diffuse. All other sources of light in the room should be turned off. Also, there should not be any reflective surfaces around the area of the photograph [black velvet under and behind the framed photograph is one solution]. There are others more experienced who could undoubtedly describe this in better detail, but this is the basic principle.

Unfortunately, removing the glare in PS will not bring back the underlying photograph.
Jun 15, 2017 21:33:07   #
canon Lee (a regular here)
 
Harry_64 wrote:
I am trying to take photos of old family photographs. The problem is the photos are framed and the glass covering is convex. The photos/frames are probably between 80 and 100+ years old. I do not want to remove photos from frames for fear of damaging either the frame or photos. Is there a way to either photograph the photos without glare or to remove the glare using Photoshop?


In the example you show its not glare but reflections. Place a black backdrop behind you. Use soft box. use adjustable polarizer . darken the room. If possible do a time exposure using natural light not flash.
As an ex picture framer, I recommend you
have an expert remove the photo for a shooting.
Jun 25, 2017 01:04:40   #
etcraig
 
Interesting side note regarding the frame ( nothing to do with the photo). Without being able to look at it more closely the frame may have been made by the American Picture Frame co. It was in Laporte, Indiana or Chicago. They made frames, school furniture and furniture for the war. There was a fire in 1918, from what I understand most of the wood was lost. Because of the war wood was hard to come by so the company went under. The owner moved on to California and did quite well in other areas. These frames and similar ones are found all over the states as it was the largest picture frame company in the states at that time. The frame was made before 1918
Jun 25, 2017 02:16:30   #
BHC (a regular here)
 
Your might want to contact a professional art restorer specializing in photographic restoral. They have specialized chemicals and techniques to loose glued backings and to separate prints from the glass with little or no damage. My first ex-wife had this done with a pair of 100+ year old large oval prints of her grandparents (~18X12). Costly and slow, but very well done.
 
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