Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Home | Photography Digest | Active Topics | Newest Pictures | Search | Login | Register | Help
Photo Analysis
Photo analysis, how to
(?)
If you would like to post a reply, then please login (if you already have an account) or register (if you don't).
Page: 1 2 next>>
May 28, 2017 19:25:07   #
robbbin
 
Hello. I'm a new forum user and very novice photographer. I took some pictures trying out different settings on my new camera and, while I admit I don't really understand all t here is to know about ISO and aperture settings, aspect ratio, depth of field settings, how can I focus on taking a picture of something (for example, a bird) when it's behind other, closer objects (vegetation)? It looks to me like the Autofocus setting took the best pictures. I would REALLY appreciate all your comments. Thanks!


(Download)
 
May 28, 2017 19:34:19   #
AK Grandpa
 
Use spot focus to isolate your subject.
Find a better viewing angle.
😊
May 28, 2017 19:42:14   #
PAR4DCR (a regular here)
 
Your auto focus picked up the grasses and the bird is not in focus. On this type of shot manual focus should be used and the focus on the bird. A higher F stop, say F8 or F11 would probably put the grasses and the bird in focus if that is your intention.

Don
May 28, 2017 19:55:28   #
tramsey
 
Bryan Peterson has a group of books out on improving your photography. I recommend 'Understanding Exposure' to start with. There are others that deal with lighting and others that talk about comprsire and then a whole host of other subjects. There are many other authors but Peterson lays it out so well even I am able to under what he is talking about. Here's a link to Amazon and the books I was talking about. Good luck and welcome to the forum


https://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Exposure-3rd-Photographs-Camera/dp/0817439390
May 28, 2017 23:25:45   #
robbbin
 
Thanks for all the help and comments! :)
May 29, 2017 09:40:14   #
bajadreamer
 
PAR4DCR wrote:
Your auto focus picked up the grasses and the bird is not in focus. On this type of shot manual focus should be used and the focus on the bird. A higher F stop, say F8 or F11 would probably put the grasses and the bird in focus if that is your intention.

Don


I would agree. Using manual focus, depending on the size of lens I am using and whether or not I am on a tripod, is very difficult for me when shooting birds. Either the camera/lens is too heavy to hold while focusing and/or the bird is moving too quickly to use Live View. Using spot focus and trying to find a "hole" in the vegetation to shoot through is the only method I have found to be reliable.

This picture, while not tack sharp focused, is an example.


(Download)
 
May 29, 2017 09:42:32   #
gvarner (a regular here)
 
The algorithm that runs auto focus assumes, among other things, that you want the nearest thing in focus. So spot focusing on the actionable subject, or manual when you can't, is the way to go. Another option is to focus on something else at a similar distance, but this is always just an approximation.
May 29, 2017 10:30:28   #
Bultaco
 
gvarner wrote:
The algorithm that runs auto focus assumes, among other things, that you want the nearest thing in focus. So spot focusing on the actionable subject, or manual when you can't, is the way to go. Another option is to focus on something else at a similar distance, but this is always just an approximation.


It takes a little extra time but iot works.
May 29, 2017 17:17:52   #
Nature_Shooter (a regular here)
 
When shooting any animal, I always spot focus on the eye, or as close to the eye as possible. That will make the bird look sharp.


(Download)
May 30, 2017 10:19:32   #
Meives
 
Many try to keep the ISO low. On ASA film it was important. But not new DSLR cameras. I shoot at 800 or 1600 if needed. Higher ISO would allow the f stop to shut down to F 11 or F 16 and this would give you much greater DOF (depth of field). I am not sure about the focus selection(center weighted average) , but this may harm the capture also. David


May 30, 2017 12:34:47   #
canon Lee (a regular here)
 
robbbin wrote:
Hello. I'm a new forum user and very novice photographer. I took some pictures trying out different settings on my new camera and, while I admit I don't really understand all t here is to know about ISO and aperture settings, aspect ratio, depth of field settings, how can I focus on taking a picture of something (for example, a bird) when it's behind other, closer objects (vegetation)? It looks to me like the Autofocus setting took the best pictures. I would REALLY appreciate all your comments. Thanks!
Hello. I'm a new forum user and very novice photog... (show quote)


You need to learn composition
 
Jun 7, 2017 14:22:15   #
dsmeltz (a regular here)
 
canon Lee wrote:
You need to learn composition


Huh??? What?? Sort of off point a bit.
Jun 9, 2017 00:15:00   #
via the lens (a regular here)
 
robbbin wrote:
Hello. I'm a new forum user and very novice photographer. I took some pictures trying out different settings on my new camera and, while I admit I don't really understand all t here is to know about ISO and aperture settings, aspect ratio, depth of field settings, how can I focus on taking a picture of something (for example, a bird) when it's behind other, closer objects (vegetation)? It looks to me like the Autofocus setting took the best pictures. I would REALLY appreciate all your comments. Thanks!
Hello. I'm a new forum user and very novice photog... (show quote)


Sometimes I miss things, did I miss the part about your camera model/type? If it is a dSLR you should be able to set a focus point when you are taking a photo. I don't know if a point & shoot will do this. So, for example, you would set the focus point on the bird, then the autofocus would know that you want the bird sharp, not the foliage in front or behind the bird. After figuring that out, you can use a single exposure point setting or (Nikon speak) a matrix (multiple type setting) or a center exposure setting. You might start out with the multiple type exposure setting for your camera and see how that does. But you do need to learn how to control the focus point in your camera if you want to shoot things like the photo you show. You'll learn all of it over time with many mistakes! But just keep on wading through and at some point you realize that you might actually know what it is you are doing with a camera...sort of, anyway! I cannot emphasize enough that you need to read the camera manual and a good, well-written book on focus and exposure for your camera, otherwise it is like shooting with a blindfold on.

Photographing wildlife is difficult in any case, you might want to start with something more stationary. Even a sitting bird is moving. If you do photograph wildlife getting the eye sharp is a must and that is difficult to do when you do not know your gear well enough to shoot quickly. Learn the basics of your gear and your shots will improve.
Jun 9, 2017 07:27:52   #
dsmeltz (a regular here)
 
bajadreamer wrote:
I would agree. Using manual focus, depending on the size of lens I am using and whether or not I am on a tripod, is very difficult for me when shooting birds. Either the camera/lens is too heavy to hold while focusing and/or the bird is moving too quickly to use Live View. Using spot focus and trying to find a "hole" in the vegetation to shoot through is the only method I have found to be reliable.

This picture, while not tack sharp focused, is an example.


Have you tried a monopod? It takes the weight with less restriction to movement.
Jun 9, 2017 10:32:09   #
canon Lee (a regular here)
 
dsmeltz wrote:
Huh??? What?? Sort of off point a bit.


Hi yes it is a bit off point but very relevant. Aside from all of the good advice everyone is giving here, I try to fill out the picture with different valuable observations.
Page: 1 2 next>>
Photo Analysis
Home | Latest Digest | Back to Top | All Sections
Contact us | Privacy policy | Terms of use
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2016 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.