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Canon vs Nikon: Which is better?
One camera setting that ruins your pictures
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Main Photography Discussion
switching from DSLR to mirrorless cameras
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Jan 10, 2017 02:31:36   #
whitewolfowner (a regular here)
 
Many photographers here have switched from DSR's to mirrorless systems. Seems many have done so because of the physical weight of the DSR system being to heavy for them either from a disability or from aging. Of course there are other reasons too and all are encouraged to comment.

The question is: if you could, no mater the reason you switched initially, would you go back to the DSLR. If you are happy with the change, let us know why; also please comment if the change has improved your images, or not, and why. If you would like to go back to the DSLR, tell us why. If you did go back we'd like to know why too. Basically, all reasons and experiences are welcome to be presented and discussed.

Also, let us know (for those of us that know little to nothing about the mirrorless world, including me. I am one of those pathetic Nikon users.) what you feel are the good systems and then the better cameras and lenses in those systems too. What would be the dream mirrorless camera and lenses to go with it. And what is your dream DSLR camera and lenses too.
 
Jan 10, 2017 02:42:05   #
oldtigger (a regular here)
 
my dream would be a 50mpx mirrorless fulframe and my pick of the zeiss lenses
Jan 10, 2017 03:02:50   #
mas24 (a regular here)
 
I know two individuals who own mirrorless cameras. One owns a Sony a6000 with 2 kit lenses. It is a crop sensor compact camera. The other owns the expensive full frame mirrorless Sony a7R2 camera, with 42 megapixels. The a6000 is affordable, if on a budget.
Jan 10, 2017 05:48:25   #
wdross (a regular here)
 
whitewolfowner wrote:
Many photographers here have switched from DSR's to mirrorless systems. Seems many have done so because of the physical weight of the DSR system being to heavy for them either from a disability or from aging. Of course there are other reasons too and all are encouraged to comment.

The question is: if you could, no mater the reason you switched initially, would you go back to the DSLR. If you are happy with the change, let us know why; also please comment if the change has improved your images, or not, and why. If you would like to go back to the DSLR, tell us why. If you did go back we'd like to know why too. Basically, all reasons and experiences are welcome to be presented and discussed.

Also, let us know (for those of us that know little to nothing about the mirrorless world, including me. I am one of those pathetic Nikon users.) what you feel are the good systems and then the better cameras and lenses in those systems too. What would be the dream mirrorless camera and lenses to go with it. And what is your dream DSLR camera and lenses too.
Many photographers here have switched from DSR's t... (show quote)


First, Nikon users are not "pathetic" and never have been. I have aged enough to know that a tool is a tool is a tool. And that is the main point of your question. What tool and why. I have chosen 4/3rds and to date Olympus and Olympus lenses. This is for size, weight, and cost. Size because my wife is a owner/travel agent and I will be traveling with her to do work for her. There is no "room" for the extra cost of an oversize carry-on. My camera meets that requirement by costing nothing extra and can be by my feet with actually room for my feet to move. Weight is important since some of these trips are what are called FAM trips and I will be carrying the camera for several hours a day for several days. Cost is very important. Neither of us has won the lottery. For less than $4000 I could buy three lenses plus one teleconverter and cover 14mm to 300mm at f2.8 and 300mm to 400 mm at f4 in full frame angle of view terms. These lenses are as sharp as any on the the market. To match the comparable quality would cost me into the tens of thousands of dollars. I can add in the 300mm f4 at $2500 to get the 600mm and 840mm full frame angle of view. The cheapest lenses in Canon or Nikon for that view are $9000 to $12,500. I know if I was shooting certain styles professionally, the requirements might not match up to 4/3rds. Which, in that case, I would have to look at full frame or medium format, which ever one would match the needs/requirements. But for me, that is not the case. One should only buy the tool that meets their needs within what budget they can afford. And I am doing my best to follow that rule.
Jan 10, 2017 05:54:44   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
whitewolfowner wrote:
Many photographers here have switched from DSR's to mirrorless systems. Seems many have done so because of the physical weight of the DSR system being to heavy for them either from a disability or from aging. Of course there are other reasons too and all are encouraged to comment.

The question is: if you could, no mater the reason you switched initially, would you go back to the DSLR. If you are happy with the change, let us know why; also please comment if the change has improved your images, or not, and why. If you would like to go back to the DSLR, tell us why. If you did go back we'd like to know why too. Basically, all reasons and experiences are welcome to be presented and discussed.

Also, let us know (for those of us that know little to nothing about the mirrorless world, including me. I am one of those pathetic Nikon users.) what you feel are the good systems and then the better cameras and lenses in those systems too. What would be the dream mirrorless camera and lenses to go with it. And what is your dream DSLR camera and lenses too.
Many photographers here have switched from DSR's t... (show quote)


I tried switching, and I went back to my DSLR. First, I tried the Sony NEX 5 and 7. That was after reading a lengthy article by Trey Ratcliff. I didn't like the EVF, the small controls that were so close together, and the image quality. I later tried a couple of the Sony RX100 - sold them. Now I have a Sony A6000 that I use when I want a compact, but I still prefer a DSLR.

I have a pair of D750s with 28-300mm, 35-70mm, 80-200mm, a few others. I'm set for life!
Jan 10, 2017 06:15:19   #
Inglese
 
I have been a Nikon user for many years and very pleased with the quality they produce. I must admit that taking a D7000 and just one zoom lens on my travels does tend to be bulky and somewhat inconvenient in crowds (I go to Italy a lot!). I was tempted by the Fuji X-Pro1 and I must say that it produces wonderful work and just that much easier to pack and carry. I also use the tiny Nikon 1 V1 and a Coolpix A. Will I get rid of the D7000? Of course not but for me, it is horses for course as the saying goes.
 
Jan 10, 2017 06:38:28   #
elliott937
 
What an excellent question to ask. I will be looking over every single response.
Jan 10, 2017 06:47:42   #
fotografz
 
There are pros and cons with either choice. I work with both.

The viewing experience of a mirrorless camera is electronic. The camera can be set to show you a simulation of existing ambient light, or can be set to show exactly what you get (overexposure camera and lens settings = overexposed viewfinder image, same with underexposure, etc.). As the ambient light gets lower, the viewfinder exhibits the effects of "gain" and can cause distracting video smear when the camera is moved from subject to subject (which will eventually be overcome when the resolution and re-fresh speeds are improved).

One advantage/disadvantage of mirrorless is that when the camera is set to automatically replay the last shot, it also appears in the viewfinder. This can be good if you want to see your last shot immediately without taking your eye from the viewfinder, or good when shooting in very bright conditions that makes review on the LCD more difficult. It also can be terribly distracting if you are shooting multiple images in a row. To eliminate that potential distraction, you have to turn off the automatic review altogether, and press a button to access the review on the LCD and in the viewfinder.

Obviously, the mirrorless cameras are smaller because they do not require a mirror box. However, in the case of comparing apples-to-apples (such as full frame sensor cameras), comparable lenses are generally the same size because they all have to cover the FF sensor. So, if you like f/1.4 lenses, the weight/bulk saving may not be as great as one would expect. I personally found that some of the smaller mirrorless cameras become unbalanced with the larger lenses.

What is really nice about mirrorless is the ability to mount almost any brand lens on the camera via a wide array of adapters. A Nikon owner can buy a mirrorless Sony and mount many, if not all, of their existing lenses on it ... and retain AF, etc.

Despite the hype and internet chatter, what I have found is that after a good amount of use with Sony mirrorless cameras to shoot weddings and events in widely varying conditions, the midrange DSLRs (even from 5 or 6 years ago), are faster, more intuitive, and easier to operate under pressure ... and in no way is mirrorless in the same universe as the Pro DSLRS.

However, in most everyday situations the mirrorless cameras with the smaller, less fast aperture lenses are great all around tools ... easy to carry and fun to use.

My ideal mirrorless is the one I have ... a Sony A7R-II with a TechArt AF adapter that allows me to use my manual focus Leica M lenses with AF! If I were to get a DSLR, it would be the latest Canon or Nikon Pro model with an array of their best fast aperture lenses. My current ideal DSLR is a Leica S(006), (although I'm not happy with the AF motor issue with this system right now).

- Marc
Jan 10, 2017 07:03:16   #
janelux
 
After being a Canon shooter for many years, the last with the wonderful 7D, I switched to a Sony A6300 with the two kit lenses and I couldn't be happier. My main reason for shooting was the weight of the dslr and lenses and that is what will keep me with my Sony. It is 24MP and does everything I need it to do and more. And the best part is that I can carry everything I need for the day of shooting in a bag the size and weight of my purse. It's not the solution for everyone, but for me it was the perfect one!!!
Jan 10, 2017 07:35:01   #
TommiRulz
 
janelux wrote:
After being a Canon shooter for many years, the last with the wonderful 7D, I switched to a Sony A6300 with the two kit lenses and I couldn't be happier. My main reason for shooting was the weight of the dslr and lenses and that is what will keep me with my Sony. It is 24MP and does everything I need it to do and more. And the best part is that I can carry everything I need for the day of shooting in a bag the size and weight of my purse. It's not the solution for everyone, but for me it was the perfect one!!!
After being a Canon shooter for many years, the la... (show quote)


Do you feel your image quality is as good ?
Jan 10, 2017 07:38:59   #
Cdouthitt (a regular here)
 
No intentions of ever going back to DSLR.

The only potential pitfall with my em1ii is a smaller capacity battery when compared to a DSLR. However that is easily over come by adding an additional battery. Otherwise I can't think of a darn thing that a DSLR does that much better.

I've posted some full res shots here...well almost full. This website won't allow for the full resolution of the high res shots.

http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-431625-1.html
 
Jan 10, 2017 08:36:00   #
DavidPine (a regular here)
 
I work with both. Mostly, it comes down to lens selection although I have a meta bones to connect my Nikon lenses to my Sony. I still prefer my Nikon cameras even though I get high quality (similar) from my Sony. I think it is a matter of personal choice and nothing more.
Jan 10, 2017 08:37:07   #
mas24 (a regular here)
 
Canon's newest mirrorless camera is the M5, the successor from the M3. Although I haven't seen this latest model, I'm interested in uhh members who will soon own it, to issue a personal review.
Jan 10, 2017 08:37:39   #
billnourse
 
I have an A6000 that is basically a travel camera for the motorcycle. When room is no object, I still prefer the DSLR. Can't give good reason, as the 6000 has very good image quality and will do anything the DSLR will do except possibly higher ISO shooting.

Bill
Jan 10, 2017 08:58:33   #
tdekany (a regular here)
 
Cdouthitt wrote:
No intentions of ever going back to DSLR.

The only potential pitfall with my em1ii is a smaller capacity battery when compared to a DSLR. However that is easily over come by adding an additional battery. Otherwise I can't think of a darn thing that a DSLR does that much better.

I've posted some full res shots here...well almost full. This website won't allow for the full resolution of the high res shots.

http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-431625-1.html


Are you not getting superior results with the larger battery in the EM1 mark 2? People are making outrages claims left and right.
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