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Canon vs Nikon: Which is better?
One camera setting that ruins your pictures
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Main Photography Discussion
Lens filters
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Jan 10, 2017 14:36:09   #
CathyAnn (a regular here)
 
I've purchased a Breakthrough CPL that is absolutely great! It's not cheap, but not all that expensive either, especially when you get some stepup rings so the CPL can be used on smaller lenses.

http://breakthrough.photography/
 
Jan 10, 2017 14:40:31   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
PaulB wrote:
David McKay in his book "Photography Demystified" suggested that using filters, except in rare circumstances, isn't a good idea. He suggests that putting a $20 or $30 filter on a $2000 lens undermines the quality of the lens. It does seem make sense. He says that using a lens hood will protect the glass from damage and not degrade image quality. Any comments from the "hogs"? Are there high quality filters that work without degrading images made with high end lenses?


Expect about ten pages of drivel, both pro and con...

Use a hood all the time. Use a protective glass "filter" when you're in a hazardous environment (trackside at a NASCAR race, on the beach in wind, taking welding photos, etc.).

Use a circular polarizer or neutral density filter or special effects filters when needed.

Don't sweat the small stuff! Absolutism is relative...
Jan 10, 2017 14:58:08   #
Geegee
 
I buy good quality UV filters (Hoya Pro 1) and have found that they stay clean longer than any other filter or lens front element. I also always use a lens hood in the taking position and with those two elements of protection I do not regularly use a lens cap (less fiddling). I only use a lens cap when I store a lens. There are a few good and a lot of not so good filters out there and the link below gives a very good evaluation. The results may surprise you.

http://www.lenstip.com/113.1-article-UV_filters_test.html
Jan 10, 2017 15:54:27   #
JohnFrim (a regular here)
 
burkphoto wrote:
... Use a hood all the time...

Except if using on-camera flash and a longish zoom lens set to wide angle. I hate when I get that shadow in the foreground!!!
Jan 10, 2017 16:40:11   #
whitewolfowner (a regular here)
 
Screamin Scott wrote:
If you have a $2000 lens I would think you would have it insured against damage. A "protective" filter will help protect against certain perils like fingerprints and some scratches, but much of the claims of scratch protection are a bit misleading.The thick glass of the element is much more damage resistant than a thin glass filter and even most newer coatings are hard to damage (compared to older lens coatings). Most scratches on the front element of a lens will have a minor effect on the resulting image. Damage on a rear element will have much more of an effect. Scratches can result from a broken "protective" filter. As for the filter affecting the image, yes there will be some detrimental effect as the extra glass wasn't included in the optical formula when the lens was designed, but most times the affects are minimal except in certain situation where a point of light is in the frame which will cause ghosting & flair Bottom line here is that it is a personal choice. My choice is not to use them but to use a lens hood & lens cap instead.
If you have a $2000 lens I would think you would h... (show quote)



I see, a scratch is OK and will not affect the image, but a filter will. Where di you get your knowledge from; looney tune land?
Jan 10, 2017 16:44:19   #
whitewolfowner (a regular here)
 
catchlight.. wrote:
Pro's tend not to use UV or protective filters because of the ill effects. A hood is far more effective. Amateurs favor them as insurance because that's what they are told to do by Pro's who sell lenses and want to make money. Effect filters are another subject and are used selectively.



I know several pros who wouldn't take a lens out of the bag without a protective filter on the lens. Pros make money with their gear and need it every day, so they take care of it. Sure many have lenses that look like they went through the war, and some have, but the functioning of the lens and the quality of the glass is pristine. They also buy pro glass so the housing can take the nicks and bangs but their glass cannot. SO they protect it with a filter and carry a spare or two in case they need it.
 
Jan 10, 2017 16:47:33   #
catchlight.. (a regular here)
 
This is exactly how it is... and to the point, Thanks for sharing!

burkphoto wrote:
Expect about ten pages of drivel, both pro and con...

Use a hood all the time. Use a protective glass "filter" when you're in a hazardous environment (trackside at a NASCAR race, on the beach in wind, taking welding photos, etc.).

Use a circular polarizer or neutral density filter or special effects filters when needed.

Don't sweat the small stuff! Absolutism is relative...
Expect about ten pages of drivel, both pro and con... (show quote)
Jan 10, 2017 16:48:58   #
whitewolfowner (a regular here)
 
Screamin Scott wrote:
Not a very compelling argument as you will likely not see a difference unless there is a point of light in the frame. In terms of "protection" there will be differences. I don't use filters but have taken images thru windows where you cannot tell that I did so. So, the issue really is more about "Protection" than effects of the filter on an image.



And what kind of reasoning is that; why not say I don't use a filter because I take photos standing on concrete. Each has as much relevance as the other. I use filters and have taken many photos through glass and the viewer would have no way of knowing it either. Reflections have nothing to do with whether you use a filter or not, but the relationship to the angle of your light source.
Jan 10, 2017 16:50:18   #
Screamin Scott (a regular here)
 
I have been shooting for years & know this from experience. See these links for your education... You really need an education in optics... As for filters effects ,visit the lens tip article referenced earlier.. Looks like you have never seen the cameras & lenses photojournalists use. Also, if the prescense of something on the front element were so detrimental to the image, how can Reflex (mirror) lenses capture any images ?
http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/1095/does-a-lens-scratch-really-impact-your-photos/
https://petapixel.com/2015/07/02/how-much-does-a-scratch-affect-the-quality-of-a-lens/
http://kurtmunger.com/dirty_lens_articleid35.html

whitewolfowner wrote:
I see, a scratch is OK and will not affect the image, but a filter will. Where di you get your knowledge from; looney tune land?
Jan 10, 2017 16:54:11   #
whitewolfowner (a regular here)
 
Bugfan wrote:
This is a no win argument. It's like house insurance. Many people automatically buy insurance for the contents of their apartments and/or for the structure of their homes. Some of them end up with a break in or a fire and the insurance company takes care of it all. Other people to not get insurance for their homes and in the process save a pile of money. Some of them are lucky by not having a fire or a break in but others to get broken into or burned to the ground. They then were not lucky and they pay for it dearly.

It's not for us to say what is best. You are welcome to say I would prefer you took insurance out or you can say in my opinion insurace is a waste of money. You can also offer your rationale for the recommendation. But after that let it go, it's really up to the individual to make the decision and to take the risk. All we can do is with them luck.
This is a no win argument. It's like house insuran... (show quote)


I agree, but these people that try to con others in not using a protective filter in the false claim that they will have sharper photos is an out right lie. I tell people the reasons to use one, and why i do. It's up to them to decide whether they want to use one or not. But to be told a falsehood and then go by it and have a lens destroyed for it is intolerable. Almost seems the touter who told the lie should be responsible for replacing that persons lens when the accident happens. Giving one's opinion is one thing but a lie or false information is another.
Jan 10, 2017 16:56:29   #
whitewolfowner (a regular here)
 
DirtFarmer wrote:
I occasionally use a Circular Polarizer when circumstances dictate it, but otherwise my lenses are bare in most situations. The only time I put a clear glass filter on a lens is when the environment dictates additional protection for the lens, e.g. salt spray, blowing sand. A cheap clear filter will not protect your lens from an impact. It will break and leave shards of glass up against your lens, and if it's a significant impact, those shards will produce additional damage to the lens. A lens hood will provide more protection. I had a camera on a tripod get blown over by a gust of wind. I had a hood on it and the hood broke without damaging the lens.

Any filter should be the best quality you can afford to protect the image.
There are times to use a clear glass filter, but they are rare.
The time to use a lens hood is all the time. I even leave the hood on in my camera bag.
I occasionally use a Circular Polarizer when circu... (show quote)



The truth is, for the best protection, use both. And the hood is something that should be used all the time for the photo, if for nothing else.
 
Jan 10, 2017 16:56:54   #
Screamin Scott (a regular here)
 
I also used to work in camera sales years ago. We were always advised to sell UV filters as lens "protection", not because they did but because they were a high profit item.


whitewolfowner wrote:
I agree, but these people that try to con others in not using a protective filter in the false claim that they will have sharper photos is an out right lie. I tell people the reasons to use one, and why i do. It's up to them to decide whether they want to use one or not. But to be told a falsehood and then go by it and have a lens destroyed for it is intolerable. Almost seems the touter who told the lie should be responsible for replacing that persons lens when the accident happens. Giving one's opinion is one thing but a lie or false information is another.
I agree, but these people that try to con others i... (show quote)
Jan 10, 2017 17:15:55   #
catchlight.. (a regular here)
 
How to win an argument most times.

1. Stay calm. Even if you get passionate about your point you must stay cool and in command of your emotions. ...
2. Use facts as evidence for your position. ...
3. Ask questions. ...
4. Use logic. ...
5. Appeal to higher values. ...
6. Listen carefully. ...
7. Be prepared to concede a good point. ...

...OK so its not possible.


whitewolfowner wrote:
I agree, but these people that try to con others in not using a protective filter in the false claim that they will have sharper photos is an out right lie. I tell people the reasons to use one, and why i do. It's up to them to decide whether they want to use one or not. But to be told a falsehood and then go by it and have a lens destroyed for it is intolerable. Almost seems the touter who told the lie should be responsible for replacing that persons lens when the accident happens. Giving one's opinion is one thing but a lie or false information is another.
I agree, but these people that try to con others i... (show quote)
Jan 10, 2017 17:21:14   #
Screamin Scott (a regular here)
 
You might note that I said the effect on IQ is negligible as I have shot images thru dirty windows that were sharp & clear.. My point is that as a protective device, their value is limited.
whitewolfowner wrote:
I agree, but these people that try to con others in not using a protective filter in the false claim that they will have sharper photos is an out right lie. I tell people the reasons to use one, and why i do. It's up to them to decide whether they want to use one or not. But to be told a falsehood and then go by it and have a lens destroyed for it is intolerable. Almost seems the touter who told the lie should be responsible for replacing that persons lens when the accident happens. Giving one's opinion is one thing but a lie or false information is another.
I agree, but these people that try to con others i... (show quote)
Jan 10, 2017 17:26:00   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
JohnFrim wrote:
Except if using on-camera flash and a longish zoom lens set to wide angle. I hate when I get that shadow in the foreground!!!


Yeaaaah, never say never. Been there, done that. It's one reason why I don't use direct flash.

I usually have my shoe mount flash a foot above my lens, on a rotating bracket that keeps the rectangular flash reflector parallel with the sensor... If you buy a bracket and DO use it for direct flash, DO NOT buy one that rotates the camera without rotating the flash, UNLESS your flash has a round reflector! If you do, you'll cut peoples' feet and heads off (with shadows) in full frame vertical compositions. My former employer bought dozens of the wrong kind, and the lab had no joy in telling photographers that they had to reshoot jobs because they had the wrong flash bracket... that we provided in the first place.

But we digress...
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