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Main Photography Discussion
Printing old negatives using computer
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Oct 2, 2011 20:49:18   #
Sourdough
 
1) I'm old, and not really knowledgeable about computers. But I do fairly well with e-mails. My interest is in being able to print old b&w negatives, eapecially up to postcard size. I have many old family negatives for which there are no prints. Would like to find a currently manufactured device which would allow me to make prints. (It isn't economically feasible to have the negatives printed using normal photographic processing.) I tried to go to Kim Komando for help, but wasn't successful. However, there were devices posted there that seem to be OK for up to about 35mm slide size.

I also have hundreds of 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 (120 film size) I'd like to get printed. (Both b&w and color.)

One device I have seen advertised is the "Slide & Negative Converter" advertised on the back of the October25, 2008. "Science News". I would appreciate comments from anyone who has used that. [Although it might possibly take 'Baby Brownie' or 127 size negatives, it appears that it might not print out the entire negative.)

But again, my main interest is to be able to get prints from the old Kodak post card size negatives.

I use a Dell 926 printer, which gives good results in copying, and enlarging, photos.

About 65 or so years ago, I had access to a high school darkroom, and really enjoyed printing, developing, and enlarging photos. I'd like to get back into that, but just don't have the time/facilities/space/etc. .

Any comments would be appreciated. Again, I'm not computer-smart, but can receive and send e-mails. Thanks for any comments ---

Sourdough
 
Oct 2, 2011 21:25:07   #
snowbear
 
I use a flatbed scanner for my 35mms. It has a negative holder and light source in the lid so the negative is backlit and properly scanned. I'm sure someone makes a scanner with 120 carrier as an option, but I wouldn't want to guess which company or what the price would be. Maybe try searching for 120 film scanners.
Oct 3, 2011 07:26:52   #
photocat
 
As snowbear suggest a flatbed scanner will do the trick for you . Look on ebay for an epson 3200 or up. You may find one new but it is harder these days to do so. You might also check Epson's website to see what they have on sale. One never knows, some refrubished will do.
Oct 3, 2011 09:13:27   #
leadstory
 
My (about 3 year old) Epson works well for me for transparencies and large negatives. HINT: don't copy at large resolution. I did and each file took up at least 20MB. That takes too long to process and it isn't necessary for printing out a nice clear picture or even putting on a CD or DVD for watching on TV. Epson has nice automatic tweaking features like color correction, scratch removal, etc. Also, it copies faster than most because its light doesn't have to warm up for a long time before the scan. Good luck!
Oct 3, 2011 10:26:44   #
Bob.J
 
I use a Epson Perfection 500 scanner, it has film/negative holders for most film sizes. I get great results fixing old slides and negatives.
Oct 3, 2011 10:35:34   #
SunnyH53
 
I don't understand how scanning negatives on a regular scanner enables you to print them as photos. I suspect that with the B&W negatives you do a reverse B&W edit (sorry, don't know the technical term). But with color?

I mainly use Picasa and am looking for a Photoshop class. I suspect it's something in Photoshop?

thanks.
 
Oct 3, 2011 10:48:43   #
walter628
 
i use a epsom 4490 flat bed scanner. it will scan 35mm and 120 size negatives or slides. it has 3 settings on it, auto, home, and professional . i got my first camera at 14......been taking photos since then, so you can believe i have plenty of negatives to work with. i have been using this scanner for about 5 years and have never had any reason to change. look into it.
Oct 3, 2011 10:51:21   #
walter628
 
i use a epsom 4490 flat bed scanner. it will scan 35mm and 120 size negatives or slides. it has 3 settings on it, auto, home, and professional . i got my first camera at 14......been taking photos since then, so you can believe i have plenty of negatives to work with. i have been using this scanner for about 5 years and have never had any reason to change. look into it.
Oct 3, 2011 10:54:38   #
photocat
 
scanners will give you options, negative or postive, then after scanning it makes a file, either jpeg or tiff, which can then be brought into a piece of software for tweaking and then printing.
Oct 3, 2011 12:11:01   #
billybob40
 
TRY THIS...
http://secure.serverlab.net/shop/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=F2D300&Category_Code=Specials&Store_Code=T00107
Oct 3, 2011 12:18:00   #
billybob40
 
GO TO adobetv.com for video on PHOTOSHOP or youtube.com I use youtube every day for info.
 
Oct 3, 2011 12:37:58   #
SunnyH53
 


I bought one of these $100 negative scanners and it was awful. This is a different brand, so might be ok. the one I got took forever to scan a negative and the quality was terrible when it finished.
Oct 3, 2011 12:40:21   #
gessman
 
Sourdough, I'm thinking you may be a joker of some kind wanting to send a bunch of interested and helpful people on a wild goose chase. You claim to not be computer savvy but you managed to find your way to this forum and toss out some pretty good information about your photographic experience 65 years ago so you're not as computer illiterate as you describe yourself. Personally, I think you're trying to yank somebody's chain.

Give us the name of that gizmo on that back of "Science News" and we'll see if we can answer your question.

If you're for real, then I'd forget that gizmo on the back of the mag and get prepared to learn some new stuff or forget it. There are places where you can take your negatives to get them printed. You might want to think about that.

If you're not for real, stop the crap and quit wasting our time in here.
Oct 3, 2011 13:00:09   #
ShelterCove
 
Scanning a negative with my Epson 500 results in a positive image in jpg format. From there you can upload it to a photo processing outfit (drug store, Costco, etc.) or you can move the images to a CD, thumbdrive or memory card and take them to the photo processor.
Oct 3, 2011 13:24:09   #
leadstory
 
SunnyH53 wrote:
I don't understand how scanning negatives on a regular scanner enables you to print them as photos. I suspect that with the B&W negatives you do a reverse B&W edit (sorry, don't know the technical term). But with color?

I mainly use Picasa and am looking for a Photoshop class. I suspect it's something in Photoshop?

thanks.


I use an Epson Perfection V500 that scans transparencies, negatives and can also be an ordinary scanner. It automatically reverses the B/W or color prints. It can even "restore" the color of old slides that have faded if you ask it to. So if you ahave an old faded slide that has yellowed and hit "restore" it will make the colors pop as if it appeared when new. I shouldn't brag on it so much, I might jinx it and it will stop working! Once I've scanned slides or negatives into computer, I save the images as jpg, the most universal file for printing. Sometimes I'll save as a tif file if I want to do something more to it with photoshop. You can print these saved image files on your own printer, or send via email or download to a travel-drive or CD, take it to your favorite photo print place and print them out at the size you desire.
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