Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Home | Photography Digest | Active Topics | Search | Login | Register | Help
Canon vs Nikon: Which is better?
One camera setting that ruins your pictures
(and more, keep reading):
 

Among our users, we have some of the most talented photographers in the world share advice that you won't find even in the most expensive subscription magazines. That's because some of them only post on our website, so you won't find this information anywhere else! Some of them post under an alias, others disclose their studio name, it's up to them. But in either case you get to read and discover photography techniques that will make you very good at taking pictures.

Unlike other websites, we don't try to pitch DSLRs, lenses, and other gear, while collecting sales commission. We don't sell photography tutorials, books, DVDs and courses, while promising that your photography will improve only if you buy what's being promoted.

Instead, we have other people, who are either professional photographers or serious amateurs, some with decades of experience, share with you what they learned, what gear they use, which products really work and which are useless, which techniques work and which don't.

It's all completely unbiased. Our users simply have no reason to lie to you. They are people just like you.

And we provide a free platform for you and them to communicate. So you get to discover this information straight from the source, from people just like you, not from editors of some magazine or sales reps of some company.

This is what makes us different from other photography websites out there that try to sell you something while claiming they are trying to help you.

If you are a beginner, intermediate, advanced, or a professional photographer, then the benefits of signing up for our free daily photography forum digest are:

• We cover both film and digital photography.

• We talk about professional (D)SLR cameras, mirrorless cameras, mid-range/prosumer models, point-and-shoot, and camera phones.

• We cover all types of photography from portraits to landscapes to action shots to macro photography. (Which one interests you the most? Stop and ask yourself right now. You'll need to be able to answer that in just a minute. No matter what you shoot, you'll get better at just that. Read below to find out why.)

• We cover all aspects of photography from picking gear to composition to working with models, and everything in between.

• Each week you'll be receiving new tips and techniques on how to take the kind of pictures that will make your friends, relatives and peers just stare in amazement, speechless, when they see your work. Yep! That's how good your photography will become.

• Daily, you'll be receiving a photography forum digest with the latest photography tips, tricks, reviews and discussions.

• If you ever have a question or need help, you can always ask, and we'll cover your question in the following newsletter issue.

• And of course, it's all completely FREE!

• Let me repeat that. Since for some reason a lot of people contact us asking if the membership is really free: we are a social website for photographers, so we don't sell anything, and we don't charge any fees. It's as simple as that.

Here is how to proceed and what to expect:

Enter your name and e-mail address below, and you'll be instantly added to our photography mailing list distribution. You'll receive a one-time confirmation e-mail. Right after that, the first e-mail with today's digest will be forwarded to you. The signup process is completely automated, so you are just a few minutes away from discovering what our existing users already received earlier today. You'll get up to speed right away on what's the latest on our website, without any long introductions or other delays.

First name:

E-mail address:

Going forward, the next digest will be released in just a few hours. So if you don't sign up now, you'll also miss everything covered in it too.

 
Photo Analysis
Incorrect settings/faulty photographer or faulty lens?
If you would like to post a reply, then please login (if you already have an account) or register (if you don't).
Page: 1 2 next>>
Nov 3, 2016 20:39:06   #
Annie B
 
Taking pictures with a Sony A6300 and a 16-70 f/4 and I'm trying to determine if this is a flawed lens, a "soft" characteristic of a zoom lens or the fault of the photographer. Seems I can't get a crisp shot from one end of his face to the other (right side of his face on the first pic is soft) I was aiming at his eye OR all over his face (left side in the second pic is not totally in focus) I was aiming just above his nose. What's the best aperture for a portrait if you want a super sharp picture or is this more pleasing? I've used the center focus and the "flexible spot" medium settings.

I know zooms are not known for producing ultra sharp pictures so to speak...Am I expecting too much?


(Download)


(Download)
 
Nov 3, 2016 20:53:54   #
Rongnongno (a regular here)
 
POF and DOF, the lens is sharp.
Nov 3, 2016 21:12:54   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
The depth of field in the second appears to be smaller than the first. Even the DOF in the first is not that large.
Nov 3, 2016 21:16:21   #
Annie B
 
So if I change the aperture to say f/8 then his face should come into focus clearer but then I'll start to get little bits of the background in focus too? How do you balance the two?
Nov 3, 2016 21:44:13   #
robertjerl (a regular here)
 
Your aperture of f/5 is not enough for the DOF you need. Shutter speed is already low and ISO high so the best solution here is more light so you can get down to f/8 or even f/11. As close as you get for a head shot like this even f/11 might not get enough depth for the entire head. More light, flash or whatever, back off a bit (DOF will get deeper) lower ISO and faster shutter and crop to the head. Move his rest/perch out a bit more from the back ground and it should stay soft.
Nov 3, 2016 22:47:22   #
ken_stern
 
robertjerl wrote:
Your aperture of f/5 is not enough for the DOF you need. Shutter speed is already low and ISO high so the best solution here is more light so you can get down to f/8 or even f/11. As close as you get for a head shot like this even f/11 might not get enough depth for the entire head. More light, flash or whatever, back off a bit (DOF will get deeper) lower ISO and faster shutter and crop to the head. Move his rest/perch out a bit more from the back ground and it should stay soft.


I agree with most of this --- Are you using a tripod? I'll assume not --- If I'm reading the EXIF correctly your focal length is 105mm & I can't remember your exact shutter speed but memory tells me it was quite a bit below that & if so then camera shake comes into play ---- move the focal length down to 50/35 or a bit lower then use the same settings & I'll bet you end up with a much sharper photo --- Cheaper then buying a new lens
 
Nov 3, 2016 23:40:47   #
RichardTaylor (a regular here)
 
error
Nov 4, 2016 00:38:05   #
robertjerl (a regular here)
 
ken_stern wrote:
I agree with most of this --- Are you using a tripod? I'll assume not --- If I'm reading the EXIF correctly your focal length is 105mm & I can't remember your exact shutter speed but memory tells me it was quite a bit below that & if so then camera shake comes into play ---- move the focal length down to 50/35 or a bit lower then use the same settings & I'll bet you end up with a much sharper photo --- Cheaper then buying a new lens


?????? Exif showing when I download = Sony 6300, 16-70 zoom @ 70, 1/30 @ f/5, ISO 3200 Where do you get 105 mm??

That is picture one, picture two shows no exif on my download.
Nov 4, 2016 01:38:10   #
ken_stern
 
robertjerl wrote:
?????? Exif showing when I download = Sony 6300, 16-70 zoom @ 70, 1/30 @ f/5, ISO 3200 Where do you get 105 mm??

That is picture one, picture two shows no exif on my download.


Ya your right --- 2nd photo ---- What I locked on was "Focal length in 35mm film" "105" --- However corrected I stand - BUT what I said the 1st time still holds true -- Hand holding a 70mm lens with a shutter speed of 1/30 will generally end up a tad fuzzy --- So either increase the shutter speed up to at least 1/70th or decrease the zoom down to say 30mm -- Or better yet put the whole damn thing on tripod
Nov 4, 2016 02:03:32   #
rehess (a regular here)
 
Annie B wrote:
So if I change the aperture to say f/8 then his face should come into focus clearer but then I'll start to get little bits of the background in focus too? How do you balance the two?
In ye olde days, a decent lens would have DOF info included on the barrel; today, they make life harder for us ... but we didn't have the Internet back then, either. There are various DOF calculators on-line that you can use to try values. Here is one, for example
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/dof-calculator.htm

Using the feline who has been coming between me and my screen as I try to respond to your query as a guide, I'm guessing that a 70mm lens would have put you within a couple of feet of the cat, which would give you only a couple of inches of DOF at best. while her (*) head is around 4" wide. The trick is to find an f-stop that will give you DOF greater than what of her (*) you're trying to photograph, and then move her (*) farther than that from the background.{although, I know from experience http://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-418957-2.html#7044096 that getting a cat where you want her (*) to be is sometimes easier said than done}

added comment: the black cat who made portrait-taking such a challenge in the link immediately above is also the one who made typing this response a challenge

incidentally, to my eyes, part of your cat is sharp, which would rule out motion blur as your problem

(*) my cats are female.
Nov 4, 2016 08:13:16   #
rdubreuil
 
I agree with Annie B, I'm ruling out motion blur as parts of the image are sharp on one side. The DOF or POF issues mentioned are less apt to be your issue. Note that a DOF and POF is are planes parallel to the camera sensor of given depth based on several factors, for example aperture and distance to the subject. The point being that the plane of focus and depth of field should be symmetrical across the image. In other words what's sharp on one side of the cat's face at the point of focus and depth of field should also be sharp on the opposite side of it's face. Look at both images and you can see that the images are only sharp on one side. To me this would suggest a decentered lens. To verify if that is the issue, setup on a tripod and shoot a flat target that is parallel to your camera, this will put the POF and DOF completely across the target. If one side is less sharp than the other, you've got a decentered lens and you'll have to send it out for repair and recalibration.
 
Nov 4, 2016 08:46:56   #
rdubreuil
 
rdubreuil wrote:
I agree with Annie B, I'm ruling out motion blur as parts of the image are sharp on one side. The DOF or POF issues mentioned are less apt to be your issue. Note that a DOF and POF is are planes parallel to the camera sensor of given depth based on several factors, for example aperture and distance to the subject. The point being that the plane of focus and depth of field should be symmetrical across the image. In other words what's sharp on one side of the cat's face at the point of focus and depth of field should also be sharp on the opposite side of it's face. Look at both images and you can see that the images are only sharp on one side. To me this would suggest a decentered lens. To verify if that is the issue, setup on a tripod and shoot a flat target that is parallel to your camera, this will put the POF and DOF completely across the target. If one side is less sharp than the other, you've got a decentered lens and you'll have to send it out for repair and recalibration.
I agree with Annie B, I'm ruling out motion blur a... (show quote)


Here's an example of what I'm talking about. This little green bug on some berries, note how the plane of focus/depth of field run parallel to the angle the insect was at to the sensor of the camera. You can clearly see the depth of field and that it runs clearly from on side of the bug through the upper berry to the other end of the bug. If one side of the image was out of focus along that plane moving across the image it would be due to a decentered lens, not the DOF/POF or motion blur.


(Download)
Nov 4, 2016 09:22:40   #
ole sarg
 
To understand what is going on go to camerasim.com and work the simulations.
Nov 4, 2016 09:23:07   #
TB4
 
robertjerl wrote:
?????? Exif showing when I download = Sony 6300, 16-70 zoom @ 70, 1/30 @ f/5, ISO 3200 Where do you get 105 mm??

That is picture one, picture two shows no exif on my download.


Since the camera is a crop sensor the 70mm is equivalent to 1.5 times that on a full frame equaling 105.
Nov 4, 2016 09:47:35   #
Armadillo
 
Annie B wrote:
Taking pictures with a Sony A6300 and a 16-70 f/4 and I'm trying to determine if this is a flawed lens, a "soft" characteristic of a zoom lens or the fault of the photographer. Seems I can't get a crisp shot from one end of his face to the other (right side of his face on the first pic is soft) I was aiming at his eye OR all over his face (left side in the second pic is not totally in focus) I was aiming just above his nose. What's the best aperture for a portrait if you want a super sharp picture or is this more pleasing? I've used the center focus and the "flexible spot" medium settings.

I know zooms are not known for producing ultra sharp pictures so to speak...Am I expecting too much?
Taking pictures with a Sony A6300 and a 16-70 f/4 ... (show quote)


Annie B,

The Depth of Focus (DOF) is way too short to capture all the head in sharp focus, and your point of focus was not the best to select.

Try setting the Aperture to Aperture Priority (Manually set Aperture) to f/8.
For the focus set the camera to center spot focus, then when composing the next shot place the center square in the viewfinder over the cat's eye, depress the shutter halfway down, recompose the scene for the photo, and press the shutter all the way down to capture the photo.

Things to remember:
The longer the focal length of the lens the shorter the DOF.
The closer the camera is to the subject the shorter the DOF.
The only way to compensate for this is to increase the Aperture, manually, to f/8.

Even with a high Aperture value, f/11 - f/22, you may not have enough DOF to capture the entire face in sharp focus.
This is where you must select the important element of the scene to be in pin sharp focus.
With the camera set to "Center Spot" focusing, when you depress the shutter half way down it will lock the focus adjustment on the center spot of the viewfinder. Placing the center square over the Cat's eye will lock that element in sharp focus, moving the camera to recompose the frame will keep the focus locked until you depress the shutter all the way down.

Michael G
Page: 1 2 next>>
          
Photo Analysis
Home | Latest Digest | Back to Top | All Sections
Contact us | Privacy policy | Terms of use
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2016 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.