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Lens Flare with Wide Angle Lens
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Oct 10, 2016 02:20:40   #
Wingpilot (a regular here)
 
I took some shots with a Tokina 11-16 lens the other day, and discovered that some flaring from the sun, even though Imhad the lens hood on. The sun was at about the 2-3 o'clock position on my right. Can anyone give me some advice on using a lens this wide in this sort of lighting condition? It was mounted on my D7200.


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Oct 10, 2016 02:23:28   #
Nikonian72
 
The lens shade only works if it casts a shadow across your entire lens. If even a small amount of glass receives direct sunlight, you can flare your image. I sometimes have another person hold a clipboard, or small collapsible reflector, or side of small cardboard box, to purposely shade my lens. As photographer, you must make sure that this 'brow' is not seen by camera sensor.
Oct 10, 2016 03:05:55   #
TucsonCoyote
 
This is also what happens when you are using a camera who's viewfinder doesn't show 100% of the picture which will be captured by the camera.
I haven't checked recently (45 years or so ) but back then only the Nikon F had a 100% viewfinder.
Notice how you can actually see the sun peaking in your shot.....bet you your D7200 wasn't showing that in the viewfinder when you took the picture!?
Oct 10, 2016 03:33:28   #
letmedance (a regular here)
 
I am thinking that the filter may be creating the flare. The circular color bands at the lower left indicate prismatic separation.
Oct 10, 2016 03:47:43   #
Leicaflex (a regular here)
 
I use a circular polarising filter which can help provided you are at right angle to the sun, which I accept is not always possible.
Oct 10, 2016 05:39:24   #
Ronbo
 
Nikonian72 wrote:
The lens shade only works if it casts a shadow across your entire lens. If even a small amount of glass receives direct sunlight, you can flare your image. I sometimes have another person hold a clipboard, or small collapsible reflector, or side of small cardboard box, to purposely shade my lens. As photographer, you must make sure that this 'brow' is not seen by camera sensor.


 
Oct 10, 2016 06:09:50   #
lamiaceae (a regular here)
 
Nikonian72 wrote:
The lens shade only works if it casts a shadow across your entire lens. If even a small amount of glass receives direct sunlight, you can flare your image. I sometimes have another person hold a clipboard, or small collapsible reflector, or side of small cardboard box, to purposely shade my lens. As photographer, you must make sure that this 'brow' is not seen by camera sensor.


Exactly, or put your camera on a tripod and you can do your own "shading" with a clipboard or foamcore or something to cast a shadow.
Oct 10, 2016 07:26:39   #
enzorino
 
Sometimes I remove the filter ( if you have one) on the lens, as the added distance from the edge of the hood to glass edge is decreased. Also I carry some of those black foam trays that I get when I purchase packaged items at the grocery store, semi cut them up and tape them to the camera/lens etc as an instant " light Block " / card. The black foam also works well as a hood for your viewing screen! Crude and effective.




Oct 10, 2016 08:13:24   #
Armadillo
 
Wingpilot wrote:
I took some shots with a Tokina 11-16 lens the other day, and discovered that some flaring from the sun, even though Imhad the lens hood on. The sun was at about the 2-3 o'clock position on my right. Can anyone give me some advice on using a lens this wide in this sort of lighting condition? It was mounted on my D7200.


Wingpilot,

The first question you need to have the answer to is, the lens hood, is it designed and made for the lens you attached it to?
The second question, the lens hood, is it a circular, or tulip type hood?
The third question, if this is a tulip hood (flower shape), was the hood positioned correctly to block light on the long side of the lens?
A tulip hood has four petals, two petals longer than the other two, and the longer petals should be aligned to the long sides of the camera frame.
(If your camera orientation is horizontal the longer petals need to be horizontally aligned).

Michael G
Oct 10, 2016 10:52:02   #
Wingpilot (a regular here)
 
Correctly noted, you can just see a bit of sunlight in the upper right of the picture. I think I haven appreciated the amount of scene that this lens can "see." There is no filter on the lens. The lens hood is the tulip type, however I don't recall which way it was oriented. The EVF on the D7200 does show 100% of the scene.

I will make sure that the lens hood has the long petal toward the sun, and I like the idea of mounting on a tripod and using myself as a large sunshield to help prevent this from occurring. I like the idea of the black foam tray attached to the lens, but I suspect it would become part of the picture with this wide angle lens. It would work on a longer lens, though. Good tip. I'll bet with a bit of ingenuity, I could create one out of a piece of flat black ABS plastic. It's soft and won't mar the lens barrel.

Thanks for all the good input.
Oct 10, 2016 10:58:44   #
lev29
 
Wingpilot wrote:
Correctly noted, you can just see a bit of sunlight in the upper right of the picture. I think I haven appreciated the amount of scene that this lens can "see." There is no filter on the lens. The lens hood is the tulip type, however I don't recall which way it was oriented. The EVF on the D7200 does show 100% of the scene.

I will make sure that the lens hood has the long petal toward the sun, and I like the idea of mounting on a tripod and using myself as a large sunshield to help prevent this from occurring. I like the idea of the black foam tray attached to the lens, but I suspect it would become part of the picture with this wide angle lens. It would work on a longer lens, though. Good tip. I'll bet with a bit of ingenuity, I could create one out of a piece of flat black ABS plastic. It's soft and won't mar the lens barrel.

Thanks for all the good input.
Correctly noted, you can just see a bit of sunligh... (show quote)
How about buying "Lens Buster"? I use it occasionally; it mounts right on the hot shoe mount.
 
Oct 10, 2016 11:13:26   #
enzorino
 
I would cut the foam to size so it is not seen. When I was using a Nikon 15mm or the old Schneider 47mm flare was always an issue, so the small sections of foam were just a part of the lens kit.
Oct 10, 2016 11:19:49   #
Wingpilot (a regular here)
 
lev29 wrote:
How about buying "Lens Buster"? I use it occasionally; it mounts right on the hot shoe mount.


Good idea. The Flare Buster is $39.95 at B&H.
Oct 10, 2016 11:40:21   #
Armadillo
 
Wingpilot wrote:
Correctly noted, you can just see a bit of sunlight in the upper right of the picture. I think I haven appreciated the amount of scene that this lens can "see." There is no filter on the lens. The lens hood is the tulip type, however I don't recall which way it was oriented. The EVF on the D7200 does show 100% of the scene.

I will make sure that the lens hood has the long petal toward the sun, and I like the idea of mounting on a tripod and using myself as a large sunshield to help prevent this from occurring. I like the idea of the black foam tray attached to the lens, but I suspect it would become part of the picture with this wide angle lens. It would work on a longer lens, though. Good tip. I'll bet with a bit of ingenuity, I could create one out of a piece of flat black ABS plastic. It's soft and won't mar the lens barrel.

Thanks for all the good input.
Correctly noted, you can just see a bit of sunligh... (show quote)


Wingpilot,

You are most welcome.

The idea behind the tulip lens hood desigh is to allow for the greatest light protection for the sensor in the aspect ration it will see coming through the lens. We used to use circular lens hoods, but they could cause vignetting in the corners at low focal lengths. The tulip design allows for correct shading all the way around the rectangular aspect ratio of the sensor. Note the deep cut into the hood at the rectangular corners where the sensor corners would be located.

It is very important to have the tulip filter made for your specific lens manufacturer and focal length.

Happy shooting,

Michael G
Oct 10, 2016 11:43:59   #
Wingpilot (a regular here)
 
Armadillo wrote:
Wingpilot,

You are most welcome.

The idea behind the tulip lens hood desigh is to allow for the greatest light protection for the sensor in the aspect ration it will see coming through the lens. We used to use circular lens hoods, but they could cause vignetting in the corners at low focal lengths. The tulip design allows for correct shading all the way around the rectangular aspect ratio of the sensor. Note the deep cut into the hood at the rectangular corners where the sensor corners would be located.

It is very important to have the tulip filter made for your specific lens manufacturer and focal length.

Happy shooting,

Michael G
Wingpilot, br br You are most welcome. br br The... (show quote)


Thank you for that information. The lens hood came with the lens, but I didn't pay attention to how I mounted it. I will be more attentive in the future. I am always learning.
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